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Africana Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
AFR 101 Introduction to Africana Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

An introduction to the major issues and the different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of people of African descent throughout the world.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement

   

AFR 120 Afro-Latin America (= LAS 120)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

From Mexico to Brazil and beyond, Africans and people of African descent have fought in wars of independence, forged mixed race national identities, and contributed politically and culturally to the making of the Americas.  Even though Latin America imported ten times as many slaves as the United States, only recently have scholars begun to highlight the role blacks and other people of African descent played in Latin American history.  This course will explore the experiences of Afro-Latin Americans from slavery to the present, with a particular focus on Haiti, Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, and Colombia.  In doing so, the course seeks to answer questions such as: What does it mean to be black in Latin America? Why has racism persisted in Latin America despite political revolutions claiming to eliminate discrimination? What are the links between blacks in Latin America and the United States? How have differing conceptions of "race" and "nation" caused the rise and decline of transnational black alliances between U.S. blacks and Afro-Latin Americans?  All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.  

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity distribution requirement

AFR 235 The 1959 Cuban Revolution (=LAS 235)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson  

This course explores the historical underpinnings of the 1959 Cuban Revolution, U.S.-Cuban relations, and how Cubans have experienced the changes the island has undergone in the past 100 years. Particular attention is given to people of African descent who make up over a one-third of the island's population. This Cuban narrative illuminates a variety of themes including the spread of U.S. imperialism, Cuba's fight for sovereignty, and race relations in the Americas.  

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major or minor requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement 

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

AFR 245 Africana Religions and Healing in the American South
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hucks

Africana Religions and Healing in the American South invites students to explore vernacular, esoteric, and healing rituals in the study of religion.  Drawing upon the fields of religious studies, history, anthropology, and literature, students will engage Africana religions beyond traditional spaces of sacred texts, doctrines, theologies, and ecclesial sites.  Instead, the course will explore the complex dynamics of "lived religion" where religion is practical, efficacious, and experiential.  Beginning in the context of Southern slavery, the course will expose students to primary and secondary written texts, visual texts, the spiritual technologies of practitioners and specialists, and the material culture that accompanies alternative modes of spiritual healing and religious meaning.  As a supplement to written texts, assignments, and discussions, the class will take a field trip to Emory University's Stuart A. Rose's Manuscript and Rare Book Library for a guided tour by Dr. Randall Burkett through their collection of Africana religious artifacts, ritual paraphernalia, and material culture. We will also take a field trip to South Carolina to the Gullah/Geechee Heritage Celebration in November.  This course has no prerequisites for the Africana Studies or Religion major.  A sample syllabus is available for EPC's review.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Religion

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

AFR 266 Africa Shoots Back, in transl. (=FRE 366)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fache

Africa Shoots Back examines West African cinema from its beginnings in the early 1960s to today.  The selection of films exposes students to new voices, perspectives and representations of Francophone West Africa from a West African perspective.  We will discuss issues of decolonization and post-colonial cultural economy, as well as analyze traditional African narrative strategies and new and unconventional images.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Visual and Performing Arts.

AFR 282 African American Literature: 18th - 19th Century (=ENG 282)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

African American Literature from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.

AFR 286 African American Literature: 1900- (=ENG 286)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

This course will introduce students to twentieth- and twenty-first century African American literature and literary criticism. It will bring together a wide range of readings from across genres and disciplines, attempting to sketch out the major aesthetic and political features of the black literary project. Authors will include Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Samuel R. Delany, Octavia Butler, Teju Cole, Claudia Rankine, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Fred Moten, and Colson Whitehead to name a few.

Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Counts as a humanities elective in the Africana Studies major.
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 292 "Fake News," Journalism and Ethics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bailey

Students will be taught how to use journalistic skills and ethics to better harness the power empathy adds to storytelling on extremely sensitive subjects such as race, politics, gender, etc. as well as learn how to navigate the world of political punditry and the growing fake news phenomenon.

AFR 297 Caribbean Literature (=ENG 297)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan

The Caribbean is key to any understanding of the New World. Caribbean Literature takes students beyond the islands' popular music, food, and landscapes to an understanding of the formation of cultures from Europe, Africa, and India that have produced two Nobel Laureates. In novels such as Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, we see how love leads to the death of a young woman in the attic in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. We'll understand, too, why and how Aime Cesaire rewrites Shakespeare's The Tempest to allow for the resurrection of the spirit of Caliban's mother, Sycorax. Students do not need to know theory to take this course.  

Students may retake this course for credit when the topic/readings change with instructor's permission.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Counts toward the Africana Studies Major.
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in Global Literary Theory.

AFR 298 Race and American Journalism
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bailey

We know the names Trayvon Martin, Sandra Bland and Tamir Rice. But we should also know the name Damon Kearns, a young black man born in Davidson who killed the only officer to die while on duty in the town - while being killed by the officer. This class will include an exhaustive look into the 20th anniversary of Kearns' death as a way of exploring larger issues of race in American journalism.  This local case study will help to illumine a myriad of lessons for young journalists and social justice warriors on the intersection of race, media, crime and inequality in the 21st century, including many that are often misunderstood or overlooked.

AFR 300 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: Fall 2017 (=LAS 300); Spring 2018 (=ENG 382)
Prerequisites & Notes

The course can be repeated for credit given sufficiently distinct topics.

FALL 2017: Afro-Cuban Feminisms (=LAS 300)

Instructor
Benson

Black and mulata women have participated in constructing Cubanidad (Cuban nationalism) since the beginning of the Cuban republic in 1902. However, the largely male-dominated national narrative that has made Che Guevara's "New Man" famous since 1959 frequently overshadows their interventions. Despite this public silence, Afro-Cubanas (Afro-Cuban women) have consistently challenged narratives of exclusion and contributed to antiracist and antisexist movements in Cuba. As theater critic, Inés María Martiatu Terry explained in 2011 one of the goals of the Afrocubanas movement is to "feminize negritude and to blacken feminism."  

This course will analyze Afro-Cubana feminisms through a close reading of the work of four key black and mulata intellectuals and activists-Sara Gómez, Nancy Morejón, Daisy Rubiera, and Gloria Rolando. In doing so, it seeks to trace the legacy of the many black and mulata women who participated in revolutionary Cuba from the 1960s to the present. In particular, the course will examine how Afro-Cubanas have challenged negative stereotypes about black women, worked both inside and outside of Cuba's state-sponsored women's movement, and fought to create space for racial and sexual rights. All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies.
Satisfies the Histories and Genealogies major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.

 

SPRING 2018: W.E.B. Du Bois at Large (=ENG 382)

Instructor
Bertholf

This course will introduce students to the major works of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois.  Readings will include (in chronological order): The Philadelphia Negro (1899); The Souls of Black Folk (1903); Dark Princess (1928); Black Reconstruction in America (1935); Color and Democracy (1945); and The World and Africa (1947) to name a few.  They will be supplemented with secondary readings by: Booker T. Washington, Michael Rudolph West, Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Hazel Carby, Paul Gilroy, Adolph Reed, Lewis Gordon, Marina Bilbija, C.L.R. James and others.

Fulfills a 300-level major thinkers requirement of the Africana Studies major.
counts as a 300-level elective and fulfills the diversity requirement in the English major.
Counts as a literature elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Justice, Community, and Equality requirement.

AFR 320 Growing up Jim Crow (= EDU 320, SOC 320)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor Kelly

Examines how a generation learned race and racism in the Age of Jim Crow. Through multiple and intersecting lenses, students will examine texts, such as oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of various topics.  Topics will include Jim Crow schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, interracial harmony, and desegregation.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

AFR 330 Women in the Africana World
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hucks

Women in the Africana World

AFR 335 Whiteness in America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hucks

Whiteness in America

AFR 360 History of the Caribbean: Race, Nation, and Politics (= LAS 360, HIS 360)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

This course explores the history of the Caribbean from pre-Colombian times to the present. The goal of the class is to trace the emergence of modern Caribbean nations beginning from their status as slave colonies of the not-so-distant past within an emphasis on the central role the Caribbean islands have played in global history.  Particular emphasis is given to the maintenance of European and North American imperial enterprises and the elaboration of racial ideologies growing out of the diversity that has characterized the island populations.  Issues to be addressed include colonialism, piracy, sugar revolution, slavery and emancipation, national independence, tourism, and Caribbean migrations. Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica will be the main areas under consideration, although texts from other islands such as the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Martinique are included.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies
Satisfies a requirement in Latin American Studies major and minor
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement
Satisfies the Cultural Diversity distribution requirement

AFR 364 Black Paris
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fache

Black Paris focuses on the deep engagement of peoples of African descent with the City of Light from Fredrick Douglass to Ta-Nehisi Coates. We will examine the full variety of black cultures that have taken shape in dialogue with Paris, including poetry, prose, journals and magazines, music, and film in English and French by African American (J. Baldwin, Richard Wright, etc.) as well as Francophone Caribbean (F. Fanon, A. Césaire) and African (A. Mabanckou, Manu Dibango) artists and intellectuals.

Satisfies a requirement in Africana Studies major.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies a
Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 371 Critical Race Theory in Education (=EDU 371)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor:
Kelly

This course introduces students to the development of critical race theory as a specific theoretical framework to explain or to investigate how race and racism are organized and operate within the United States.  The course will have a sociological focus with emphasis on critical race scholarship that includes, but is not limited to, an analysis of double consciousness, colorblindness, intersectionality, whiteness as property, racial microaggressions, and structures of power.  Students will also explore central tenets and key writings advanced in the 1990s primarily by African American, Latino/a, and Asian American scholars in law, education, and public policy.  The course is both reading intensive and extensive with a major writing assignment that addresses a theoretical problem that grows out of the course topics and discussions. 

Satisfies a major requirement in Educational Studies and Africana Studies.
Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

AFR 383 Black Literary Theory (=ENG 483)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

(Cross-listed with ENG 483)

This course will bring together readings both literary and critical/theoretical, beginning with Frantz Fanon's seminal Black Skin, White Masks (1952). Taking Fanon as its point of departure, then, this course will necessarily turn to a discussion of the recent discourse on Afro-pessimism and black optimism, attempting to introduce students to important issues and questions of race, race relations, anti-black racism, black sociality, the universality of whiteness, the fungibility of the black body, and of the vulnerability and precarity of black life; and together we will think more closely about how the complex and "unthinkable" histories of slavery, colonialism, and the Middle Passage, for examples, continue to challenge the representational limits and potentialities of traditional literary genres and modes of emplotment. In addition to Fanon, authors will include Orlando Patterson, Toni Morrison, Hortense Spillers, Saidiya Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Jarred Sexton, and Fred Moten.

Counts as a humanities elective for the Africana Studies major.
Counts as a senior seminar and fulfills the diversity requirement for the English major.
Counts as a literature elective for the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.

AFR 395 Seminar in Africana Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Seminar in advanced Africana Studies

AFR 495 Africana Studies Capstone
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

Advanced Seminar in Africana Studies.

ANT 205 Ethnic Relations and Social Media
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Bowles

Comparative and historical study of social processes related to ethnic differences in modern complex societies. Readings in theoretical and descriptive literature, focusing on issues of unequal distribution of power and privilege, racism, and ethnic prejudice.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ANT 232 Contemporary Ghanaian Society and Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Summer 2016; offered in alternating years as part of the Davidson in Ghana summer program.)

Instructor
Staff

Examination of Ghanaian family structure, gender roles, religious beliefs, social stratification, political economy, and inter-ethnic relations. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the legacy of colonialism and efforts to develop a national culture.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ANT 233 Performing Arts in West Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Co-requisite: ANT 232 Contemporary Ghanaian Society and Culture (Davidson in Ghana Summer Program). (Summer 2016; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Staff

Course in traditional Ghanaian music and dance. Students learn singing, dancing, and drumming at the School of African Rhythm and Dance with a master drummer and several Ghanaian instructors. In addition to the historical and sociocultural perspectives taught by the master drummer, students will visit churches and celebrations that incorporate music and dance. Coursework will include lectures and reading assignments on African performing arts, a reflective and analytical essay, practices, appreciation of performing arts in contemporary sociocultural contexts, and a student performance at the end of the program. This course meets for a minimum of 50-60 semester hours. Graded on a P/F basis.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology with permission.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

ANT 234 African Popular Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Bowles

Though ethnographic texts, this course explores the intersections of gender, ethnicity and class in African societies in the 20th and 21st centuries. This course also examines representations of Africa within the nation-state and transnationally. Topics of discussion include tourism, national identity and ethnicity, popular culture, the dichotomies of urban and rural Africa and the cultural politics of development and the state.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ANT 253 Latin American Society and Culture Today
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Samson

Overview of Latin American culture from an anthropological perspective.  An ethnographic focus demonstrates linkages between life in local communities and forces of cultural, social, and political change at the level of the nation-state.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies one of the introductory course requirements in Latin American Studies.

ANT 257 African Roots, American Soils
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Bowles

This course introduces the African Diaspora as a theoretical framework within anthropology for investigation of the dispersal of people of African descent throughout the world. This course examines African cultural influences that inform a diaspora connected through migrations, both voluntary and involuntary, as well as colonization and the globalization of capitalism. Topics of discussion include the cultural production of blackness, roots tourism, resistance to oppression, revolutions, rebellions and maroon communities.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ANT 323 Human Rights in Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Samson

Anthropological perspectives on human rights agendas in Latin America. Case studies examine the tension between universal and culturally relative conceptions of human rights in relation to issues such as state violence, violence directed toward minorities, and social justice movements.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ANT 335 Debunking Race
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Cho

Examines the concept of race from a biocultural perspective, deconstructing race by exploring evidence from population genetics and human origins. Contemporary racial issues such as classification of racial/ethnic groups, and evaluating intelligence and achievement on the basis of race/ethnicity are explored.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ANT 371 Ethnographic Writing and Research
Prerequisites & Notes

ANT 101 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

Instructor
Samson

Approaches to ethnographic and ethnohistorical research and analysis in cultural anthropology. Examination of selected studies that demonstrate a variety of approaches to the study of single cultures and to cross-cultural comparisons. Students design and complete research projects. With advance departmental approval, an off-campus ethnographic field school course may be substituted for credit toward the major.

One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

ANT 372 Visualizing Anthropology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Lozada

Introduction to the theories and methods necessary for making ethnographic films. Students will conduct fieldwork and make a documentary film on a particular aspect of social and cultural behavior. Emphasis is placed on developing the critical skills needed for resolving some of the ethical, technical, and aesthetic problems that may emerge during the documentation of social and cultural behavior.

One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

ANT 386 Seminars in Anthropology - Feminist Anthropology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017)

Instructor
Staff

One-time seminars in selected topics in anthropology. Topics announced in advance.

Satisfies a major requirement in Anthropology

Counts in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major
 

DAN 284 Dancing Diaspora: The African American Theatrical Dance Tradition
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bory

Drawing on scholarship about the African Diaspora, this lecture/discussion course examines how United States dance performance has shaped and been shaped by ideas about Africanist aesthetics and cultural identities.  Exploring entertainment and concert performances from late minstrelsy to the present day, the class will investigate both how black dance artists have staged their cultural experiences, and how those theatrical representations have been received and interpreted. Course work includes readings, performance viewings, presentations, and written assignments.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies. 
Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

ECO 229S Urban Economics
Prerequisites & Notes

Economics 101.

Instructor
F. Smith

Role of economics in the development of modern cities. Topics include: the monocentric-city model, urban land values, crime, transportation, education, and taxation.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 

ECO 324 Labor Economics
Prerequisites & Notes

Economics 105 and Economics 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructors
M. Foley, Ross

Labor markets, unionization, unemployment, and public policy primarily in the setting of the United States. (A student may not receive credit for both ECO 224 and ECO 324.)

Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

EDU 250 Multicultural Education
Prerequisites & Notes


 

Instructor
Staff

This course examines the ways in which schools and society in the United States engage with diverse individuals and groups, as well as how obstacles to ever-increasing multiculturalism are rooted in behaviors, assumptions, values, thinking and communication styles.  The course will be taught using the intergroup dialogue model where two facilitators of differing social identity groups encourage dialogue among students about persistent social issues and conflicts related to race, racism, and the intersections of class, gender, sexual orientation, religion and immigration/migration background.  The intergroup dialogue approach to teaching multicultural education is pedagogically unique.  The class is balanced with approximately half of the students self-identifying as White and the other half identifying as Students of Color or racial minorities in the United States and at Davidson College.


Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 

EDU 260 Oppression & Education (=SOC 260)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This course examines various manifestations of oppression in the United States and the questions they raise about inequality and social justice within educational institutions.  We will apply methods of critical analysis drawn from anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and psychology to an examination of social issues in the United States educational system.  We will examine education as a central site of conflict over the gap between the United States' egalitarian mission and its unequal structure, processes, and outcomes.  Students will rethink contemporary solutions to social diversity in education, develop a social justice framework which emphasizes inequality, and design an institutional ethnographic project as a critical intervention in schools and society.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

EDU 290 Oral History: Problems, Perspectives, & Possibilities (=SOC 290)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Kelly

In this hands-on methods course, students will build interdisciplinary research skills focused on the theory and practice of oral history.  We will explore the theories, methods, and debates surrounding one of the oldest research tools: oral testimony.  Students will learn to critically evaluate oral sources and use oral histories in conjunction with other forms of research.  Students will engage with the practical aspects of oral history by completing and transcribing two oral history interviews.  In addition, students will gain a sophisticated understanding of individual and collective memory and the questions that both raise for writing oral history.  Each student will participate in a class oral history project.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies
Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology
Satisfies a major requirement in CIS Educational Studies
Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement

 

EDU 320 Growing up Jim Crow (= AFR 320, =SOC 320)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

Examines how a generation learned race and racism in the Age of Jim Crow.  Through multiple and intersecting lenses, students will examine texts, such as oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of various topics.  Topics will include Jim Crow schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, interracial harmony, and desegregation.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

EDU 330 Sociology of Education (=SOC 330)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Kelly

(Cross-listed as SOC 330.) An introduction to the sociological study of education in the United States, including an examination of the school as an organization within a larger environment. Explores the link between schools and social stratification by analyzing the mutually generative functions of schools and considers how processes within schools can lead to different outcomes for stakeholders.

Provides major credit in Sociology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

EDU 340 Education in African American Society (=SOC 340)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Kelly
(Cross-listed as SOC 340.) This seminar explores the social and historical forces shaping the education of people of African descent in the United States from slavery to the 21st century.  We will examine values, beliefs, and perspectives on education across gender and class lines, individual and group efforts toward building educational institutions and organizations, hidden or forgotten educational initiatives and programming, and cross-cultural projects to promote literacy and achievement in African American society.  Students will write a seminar paper and complete a midterm and final review. 

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a major credit in Sociology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 




 

EDU 371 Critical Race Theory in Education (=AFR 371)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor:
Kelly

This course introduces students to the development of critical race theory as a specific theoretical framework to explain or to investigate how race and racism are organized and operate within the United States.  The course will have a sociological focus with emphasis on critical race scholarship that includes, but is not limited to, an analysis of double consciousness, colorblindness, intersectionality, whiteness as property, racial microaggressions, and structures of power.  Students will also explore central tenets and key writings advanced in the 1990s primarily by African American, Latino/a, and Asian American scholars in law, education, and public policy.  The course is both reading intensive and extensive with a major writing assignment that addresses a theoretical problem that grows out of the course topics and discussions. 

Satisfies a major requirement in Educational Studies and Africana Studies.
Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ENG 220 Literary Analysis
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor 
Staff

Designed for majors. Emphasizes theoretical approaches and critical strategies for the written analysis of poetry, fiction, and drama and/or film. Writing intensive. Required for the major.  Students who major in English should complete 220 by the end of the sophomore year. Those who do not meet this deadline must make special arrangements with the Chair.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 282 African American Literature: 18th - 19th Century (=AFR 282)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

African American Literature from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.

ENG 284 African American Drama
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fox, Flanagan

This course will focus on African-American drama since the 1960s.  We will consider how playwrights worked to create a black aesthetic, question and rewrite history, explore intersectional identities, counter stereotypes, and build community.  These plays do not simply exist in opposition to some "mainstream" American tradition; rather, they are deeply, profoundly American, inviting all of us to engage discussions around race, history, privilege, and inequity that are deeply embedded in our artistic and social heritage as a country. At the same time, we will also ask: how to they reflect conversations within the community they represent?

We will read work by playwrights including (but not limited to): August Wilson, Katori Hall, Lynn Nottage, Tarell Alvin McCraney, Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins, Robert O'Hara, Suzan-Lori Parks, Anna Deavere Smith, Adrienne Kennedy, Amiri Baraka, and Lynn Manning.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.

ENG 286 African-American Literature: 1900- (=AFR 286)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

This course will introduce students to twentieth- and twenty-first century African American literature and literary criticism. It will bring together a wide range of readings from across genres and disciplines, attempting to sketch out the major aesthetic and political features of the black literary project. Authors will include Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Samuel R. Delany, Octavia Butler, Teju Cole, Claudia Rankine, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Fred Moten, and Colson Whitehead to name a few.

Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Counts as a humanities elective in the Africana Studies major.
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

 

ENG 290 World Literatures - South Africa & C. Europe
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan

Designed for majors and prospective majors.  A historical survey of selected texts outside the British and American literary traditions.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies when taught by Prof. Flanagan.

ENG 294 Harlem Renaissance
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Churchill

Read major texts of the Harlem Renaissance and explore issues of race, gender, sexuality, migration, & diaspora that shaped this formative moment in twentieth century literature. We will read poetry, fiction, essays, and plays by W. E. B. DuBois, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, and others, situating their work in the context of developments in modern art, music, sociology, psychology, and print culture.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Counts toward the Africana Studies Major.
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

ENG 297 Caribbean Literature (=AFR 297)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan

The Caribbean is key to any understanding of the New World. Caribbean Literature takes students beyond the islands's popular music, food, and landscapes-ah, those sandy beaches!-to an understanding of the formation of cultures from Europe, Africa, and India that have produced three winners of Nobel prizes-two in Literature and for Economics. In novels, poems and plays we'll examine the ways in which this particular part of the "Empire" wrote back to Europe before creating its own distinctive body of literature. The course is open to all students, and knowledge of literary theory is not a prerequisite. The most relevant theories will be taught to the class.

 
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Counts toward the Africana Studies Major.
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.

ENG 340 Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor 
Ingram

Special topics in a selection of Medieval and Renaissance texts (to 1660) with attention to critical approaches.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 382 W.E.B. Du Bois at Large (=AFR 300 SPR 2018)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

(ENG 382 cross-listed with AFR 300 during spring 2018 semester only.)

This course will introduce students to the major works of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois.  Readings will include (in chronological order): ThePhiladelphia Negro (1899); The Souls of Black Folk (1903); Dark Princess (1928); Black Reconstruction in America (1935); Color and Democracy (1945); and The World and Africa (1947) to name a few.  They will be supplemented with secondary readins by: Booker T. Washington, Michael Rudolph West, Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Hazel Carby, Paul Gilroy, Adolph Reed, Lewis Gordon, Marina Bilbija, C.L.R. James and others.

Fulfills a 300-level major thinkers requirement of the Africana Studies major.
Counts as a 300-level elective and fulfills the diversity requirement in the English major.
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisplinary minor.
Satisfies the Justice, Community, and Equality requirement.

ENG 482 Seminar: Poetics of Relation - Toni Morrison and Alice Walker
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan 

Poetics of Relation is the rubric for a seminar in which students will analyze the ways in which the discursive forms-novels, plays, essays, and poetry-of two writers relate to specific cultures, landscapes, and historical moments. In its two previous iterations, students have examined such relationships in writings by Nobel Laureates Derek Walcott, Vidia Naipaul, and Wole Soyinka. In Spring 2016, the focus will be, for the first time, on two African American female writers, Toni Morrison and Zora Neale Hurston. In addition to close readings, substantive discussions, oral presentations and one major essay, seminar participants will add to an existing Poetics of Relation digital website available through the Davidson College library.

Provides major credit in Africana Studies.  
Satisfies the diversity requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a Cultural Diversity requirement.

ENG 483 Black Literary Theory (=AFR 383)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

(Cross-listed with AFR 383)

This course will bring together readings both literary and critical/theoretical, beginning with Frantz Fanon's seminal Black Skin, White Masks (1952). Taking Fanon as its point of departure, then, this course will necessarily turn to a discussion of the recent discourse on Afro-pessimism and black optimism, attempting to introduce students to important issues and questions of race, race relations, anti-black racism, black sociality, the universality of whiteness, the fungibility of the black body, and of the vulnerability and precarity of black life; and together we will think more closely about how the complex and "unthinkable" histories of slavery, colonialism, and the Middle Passage, for examples, continue to challenge the representational limits and potentialities of traditional literary genres and modes of emplotment. In addition to Fanon, authors will include Orlando Patterson, Toni Morrison, Hortense Spillers, Saidiya Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Jarred Sexton, and Fred Moten.

Counts as a humanities elective for the Africana Studies major.
Counts as a senior seminar and fulfills the diversity requirement for the English major.
Counts as a literature elective for the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.

FRE 335 French Colonial Empire
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fache

This course focuses on literature written in the colonies under French colonial rule. France's colonial history started in the 16th century and ended with bitter defeats in Vietnam (1955) and Algeria (1962). With focus on a specific region (North Africa, Asia, Africa, or the West Indies) and/or time period, the students will examine texts produced by writers in the colonies and in France to understand the complexities of oppression and intricacies of colonization, and how the texts subvert or reinforce colonial power.

Satisfies a requirement in French and Francophone Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies a Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

FRE 364 Paris Noir
Prerequisites & Notes

FRE 212 Oral Expression or FRE 222 Introduction to Literature or FRE 260 Contemporary France

Instructor
Fache

This course examines the lives and works of artists and intellectuals from Africa, the African Diaspora and the US in Paris (1920-1960).


Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a requirement in French & Francophone Studies major and minor.
Satisfies an elective requirement in Africana Studies major. 

FRE 366 Africa Shoots Back, in transl. (=AFR 266)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fache

Africa Shoots Back examines West African cinema from its beginnings in the early 1960s to today.  The selection of films exposes students to new voices, perspectives and representations of Francophone West Africa from a West African perspective.  We will discuss issues of decolonization and post-colonial cultural economy, as well as analyze traditional African narrative strategies and new and unconventional images.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Visual and Performing Arts.

FRE 368 France and Métissage
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered 220 or above. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Fache

Course explores the concept of métissage in the contemporary French literary context.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

GSS 201 Feminist and Queer Theories
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Tilburg, Boyer, Horowitz

This class explores the epistemological and theoretical foundations of Gender and Sexuality Studies. Students will become familiarized with the different theoretical traditions that inform contemporary gender analysis, and examine scholarly definitions of gender and sexuality. We discuss the means by which gender and sexuality are produced and reproduced at the individual and institutional levels, their intersection with other dimensions of social difference, as well as various related approaches to and interpretations of equality, justice, and freedom.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HIS 162 Latin America to 1825
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

A survey of Latin American history from the eve of Spain's conquest of the Americas to the era of Latin American independence from Spain. An introduction to the societies of the Americas and the major social, political, and economic themes following the arrival of Europeans to the Americas. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 163 Place & Nation in Modern Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

This course introduces students to Latin American history through themes related to place and space.  Newly independent nations were eager to defend, define, and regulate territory as well as public and domestic spaces.  By following the hows and whys of space and place from Independence to the late 20th century, we chart important political, social, economic, and cultural changes. Topics will include museums, schools, parks, prisons, transportation, maps, and borders. Through learning about the actions of governments and people in these places and spaces, we will analyze how national identity was defined and contested by individuals of multiple classes, races, genders.

Satisfies an Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satifisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 168 Africa to 1800
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wiemers

Introduction to the major civilizations and cultures of Africa from prehistoric times through the Transatlantic slave trade, examining changes in economy, ecology, and societies as Africa became involved in the global economy. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies interdisciplinary minor requirement in International Studies and Ethnic Studies.

HIS 169 The Making of Modern Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wiemers

Survey of African history from the end of the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present, emphasizing major trends in economic, political, and social life in colonial and post-colonial Africa. Introduces students to critical  historical debates and a range of historical artifacts including oral histories, African literature, and popular culture. 

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a requirement in the International Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement. 

HIS 230 African Diasporas, German Encounters: Histories, Conflicts and Movements
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Weimers

 

Provides new perspectives on African Diasporas and Germany by exploring how Germans interacted with and impacted the lives of African Americans in North America and indigenous peoples on the African continent and how, in turn, African Americans and Africans in the German lands profoundly reshaped things German since the eighteenth century.  The course will examine these complex histories with a particular emphasis on the Black Atlantic, migration and labor, cultural practice and political activism, gender relations, racism, violence, war, and genocide.

Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies history distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 259 US Latino/a History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

This course contends that we cannot understand the history of the US without studying the history of Latin@s from the colonial-era Spanish possessions to the US-Mexican War era to the Bracero era and, finally, the beginnings of Latino Charlotte in the late 20thc. Themes include migration, labor, religion, cultural identity, political organization. Students will learn about the cultures and experiences of Latinos with the US as well as US government responses to Latinos.  Emphasis on Mexican-Americans with some attention to the Caribbean and South American experience. 


Satisfies a major credit in Latin American Studies.
Satisfies an Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement. 

HIS 267 Health and Society in Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wiemers

Histories of health, healing, and disease control in Africa from c. 1500 to the present.  Explores the ways African people and states have conceived of and responded to relationships between human and natural environment, between individual and collective well-being, and between bodily and social health.

Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement 

HIS 302 African American History to 1877
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Guasco
African American experience from the colonial period through the Reconstruction era. Topics include the slave trade, the institution of slavery, free blacks, slave revolts, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and African American culture. 

Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 303 African American Society & Culture since 1877
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Aldridge

African American experience since the end of Reconstruction. Topics include the origins of the Jim Crow system, the Harlem Renaissance, black participation in the military, and the civil rights movement. 

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 343 The Old South
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The American South from colonial origins to secession with major emphasis on the antebellum period, 1800 to the outbreak of the Civil War.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.

HIS 344 The South since 1865
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Political, economic, and social developments in the South since the Civil War. Focus on Reconstruction, Populism, racism, the Depression, the flourishing of the "Sun Belt'' after 1945, and the civil rights movement. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.

HIS 346 The Civil War and Reconstruction
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Origins of sectional conflict; the battle front and home front, military, political, and social transformations of the war years; the upheavals of the Reconstruction era; and the legacies of the era for modern America. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.

HIS 357 The Civil Rights Movement in the United States
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Aldridge

An examination of the American civil rights movement's origins; its diverse strains of thought; its legal issues, strategies, and grassroots efforts; and its legacies. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 358 Civil Rights Wars, Civil Rights Warriors
Prerequisites & Notes

Spring

Instructor
Staff

An oral history-based course that examines the lawyers and litigants who, in the 1960s and 1970s, accepted personal and financial risk to challenge Jim Crow laws.  Students will interview and videotape the courageous lawyers, prepare a video documentary.  Research essays on current civil rights topics as well.

HIS 360 History of the Caribbean: Race, Nation, and Politics (=AFR 360, =LAS 360)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

This course explores the history of the Caribbean from pre-Colombian times to the present. The goal of the class is to trace the emergence of modern Caribbean nations beginning from their status as slave colonies of the not-so-distant past within an emphasis on the central role the Caribbean islands have played in global history.  Particular emphasis is given to the maintenance of European and North American imperial enterprises and the elaboration of racial ideologies growing out of the diversity that has characterized the island populations.  Issues to be addressed include colonialism, piracy, sugar revolution, slavery and emancipation, national independence, tourism, and Caribbean migrations. Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica will be the main areas under consideration, although texts from other islands such as the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Martinique are included.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies
Satisfies a  requirement in Latin American Studies major and minor
Satisfies an Historical Thought distribution requirement
Satisfies a cultural diversity distribution requirement

HIS 362 The Cuban Revolution (= AFR 235 and LAS 235)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson  

This course explores the historical underpinnings of the 1959 Cuban Revolution, U.S.-Cuban relations, and how Cubans have experienced the changes the island has undergone in the past 100 years. Particular attention is given to people of African descent who make up over a one-third of the island's population. This Cuban narrative illuminates a variety of themes including the spread of U.S. imperialism, Cuba's fight for sovereignty, and race relations in the Americas.  

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement 

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

HIS 363 African Encounters with Development
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wiemers

Examines how projects for "development" have been conceived and carried out in colonial and post-colonial Africa, and how they have been represented and understood by African people, governments, and international actors.  Explores the interaction of ideas and experience-from changing economic and political theories to the daily practices of farmers, bureaucrats, activists, and scholars.

Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement 

HIS 364 Race, Sex, Power in Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

This course focuses on the history of Latin America through overlapping lenses of race, sexuality, gender, and class. Specific topics include sexuality and the Inquisition, reproductive health and the state, gender and revolution, sexual repression in dictatorship. Discussions of historical context, power structures, and intersectionality will serve as the starting point for the semester.  Thereafter we will divide our time between analysis of primary historical texts and cutting edge scholarship.

Satisfies an Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.
 

HIS 366 Slavery and Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wiemers

Explores slavery and slave trades in and out of Africa from the 5th to the 20th centuries, as a way of understanding changing relationships between trade, personhood, and social belonging.  Special attention to ideas of and debates about, race, slave status, and diaspora.

Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement. 

HIS 369 Urban Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Weimers

Examines urban life in Africa from early origins to the present. Uses a variety of sources, including material and visual culture, to understand the changing ways that urban dwellers, rural migrants, and a state governments came to see and encounter cities.

Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies a Historical Thought distribution requirement.

HIS 440 Slavery in the Americas
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Guasco

Comparative exploration of the foundation and development of slavery in the western hemisphere since 1492. Topics include the transatlantic slave trade, work and labor, resistance and rebellion, and the articulation of African culture throughout the Americas.

HIS 444 Southern Women, or How to Explain Scarlett and Mammy
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

An examination of the changing roles of black and white southern women from 1607 to the present, with an emphasis on understanding their unique character and history.

HIS 449 Age of Revolution: The United States in the 1960s
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Aldridge

A seminar on an important era of changes and transformation in American history.  Topics studied include the civil rights movement, the counterculture, the New Left, the Vietnam War, and the women's movement.

HIS 451 African American Cultural History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Aldridge

A study of African American cultural history with particular focus on the 20th century. Specific artistic and cultural forms studied may include the visual arts, music, dance, film, and television in their historical context.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 464 Religion and Social Change in Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

Exploration of the nexus between religion and social upheaval through topics including conquest, rebellion, liberation theology, and religious tradition new to the region, such as Evangelicalism.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 465 Colonialism and Imagination in Early Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

The rise and fall of colonial power in Latin America with a focus on the emergence of colonial Latin America as a historical unit.  Topics include justification of colonial rule, civilization and barbarism, differences between the Old and New Worlds, and American Identity.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 466 Migrations and Immigration in Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

Study of the relationship between internal migrations and outward immigration in Latin America.  Students will acquire in-depth information about migration/immigration in the early colonial period, in the neo-imperial nineteenth century, and in the twentieth century.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 467 Family and Families in African History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Weimers

Studies how Africans have defined and achieved family and family connections along with ways that states have attempted to use family--as metaphor, ideal, and unit of political and social organization-to organize African life from the 17th century to the present. 

Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a major and a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.

HIS 469 Work, Gender, and Political Imagination in Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wiemers

Investigates how gender and labor have been used to construct and contest the political imaginaries of individuals, communities, and states in 19th and 20th c Africa.

Satisfies a major requirement in History

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity distribution requirement

LAS 120 Afro-Latin America (= AFR 120)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

From Mexico to Brazil and beyond, Africans and people of African descent have fought in wars of independence, forged mixed race national identities, and contributed politically and culturally to the making of the Americas.  Even though Latin America imported ten times as many slaves as the United States, only recently have scholars begun to highlight the role blacks and other people of African descent played in Latin American history.  This course will explore the experiences of Afro-Latin Americans from slavery to the present, with a particular focus on Haiti, Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, and Colombia.  In doing so, the course seeks to answer questions such as: What does it mean to be black in Latin America? Why has racism persisted in Latin America despite political revolutions claiming to eliminate discrimination? What are the links between blacks in Latin America and the United States? How have differing conceptions of "race" and "nation" caused the rise and decline of transnational black alliances between U.S. blacks and Afro-Latin Americans?  All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.  

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity distribution requirement

LAS 235 The 1959 Cuban Revolution (= AFR 235)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

 This course explores the historical underpinnings of the 1959 Cuban Revolution, U.S.-Cuban relations, and how Cubans have experienced the changes the island has undergone in the past 100 years. Particular attention is given to people of African descent who make up over a one-third of the island's population. This Cuban narrative illuminates a variety of themes including the spread of U.S. imperialism, Cuba's fight for sovereignty, and race relations in the Americas.  

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major or minor requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement 

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

 

LAS 300 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: Afro-Cuban Feminisms (=AFR 300)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

Black and mulata women have participated in constructing Cubanidad (Cuban nationalism) since the beginning of the Cuban republic in 1902. However, the largely male-dominated national narrative that has made Che Guevara's "New Man" famous since 1959 frequently overshadows their interventions. Despite this public silence, Afro-Cubanas (Afro-Cuban women) have consistently challenged narratives of exclusion and contributed to antiracist and antisexist movements in Cuba. As theater critic, Inés María Martiatu Terry explained in 2011 one of the goals of the Afrocubanas movement is to "feminize negritude and to blacken feminism."  

This course will analyze Afro-Cubana feminisms through a close reading of the work of four key black and mulata intellectuals and activists-Sara Gómez, Nancy Morejón, Daisy Rubiera, and Gloria Rolando. In doing so, it seeks to trace the legacy of the many black and mulata women who participated in revolutionary Cuba from the 1960s to the present. In particular, the course will examine how Afro-Cubanas have challenged negative stereotypes about black women, worked both inside and outside of Cuba's state-sponsored women's movement, and fought to create space for racial and sexual rights. All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.

The course can be repeated for credit given sufficiently distinct topics.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies the Histories and Genealogies major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

LAS 360 History of the Caribbean: Race, Nation, and Politics (= AFR 360, = HIS 360)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

This course explores the history of the Caribbean from pre-Colombian times to the present. The goal of the class is to trace the emergence of modern Caribbean nations beginning from their status as slave colonies of the not-so-distant past within an emphasis on the central role the Caribbean islands have played in global history.  Particular emphasis is given to the maintenance of European and North American imperial enterprises and the elaboration of racial ideologies growing out of the diversity that has characterized the island populations.  Issues to be addressed include colonialism, piracy, sugar revolution, slavery and emancipation, national independence, tourism, and Caribbean migrations. Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica will be the main areas under consideration, although texts from other islands such as the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Martinique are included.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies
Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major and minor
Satisfies an Historical Thought distribution requirement
Satisfies a cultural diversity distribution requirement

MUS 122 Music of the United States
Prerequisites & Notes

No music training required. (Spring)

Instructor
Staff

The cultivated and vernacular traditions of U.S. music from the Colonial period to the present. Focus on close listening and cultural trends. Topics include: parlor song, minstrelsy, Tin Pan Alley, ragtime, blues, jazz, modernism, country, rock, postmodernism.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement. 

MUS 232 Jazz
Prerequisites & Notes

No muisc training required. (Fall; normally offered in alternate years.)

Instructor
B. Lawing

A general introduction to jazz. The class will explore the roots of jazz, will critically examine jazz improvisation, and will present a history of jazz from its beginnings to the present.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement. 

MUS 241 Music of Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

No music training required. (Fall; normally offered in alternate years.)

Instructor
Botelho

An introduction to the music of Hispanic and Luso American countries and cultures from colonial times to the present.  Topics include: sacred and secular colonial music, son, marimba music, vieja guardia music, tonada, milonga, tango, Latin jazz, samba, and bossa nova.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.  Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.  

MUS 246 Music of Brazil
Prerequisites & Notes

No music training required. (Fall; normally offered in alternate years.)

Instructor
Botelho

A survey of cultivated and vernacular traditions of Brazilian music from colonial times to the present. Topics include: sacred and secular colonial music, the barroco mineiro, nationalism, the avant-garde, samba, bossa nova, MPB, candomblé, jazz, tropical rock, and rap.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.  Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

POL 201 Methods and Statistics in Political Science
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to first-year students.

Instructors
Ceka, Menkhaus, O'Geen, Rigger, Sellers, Toska

The framework of social science analysis, and the use of statistics for studying political problems. Topics range from research design and hypothesis testing to correlation and multiple regression.

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement. 
Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

 

POL 226 Racial and Ethnic Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Phan

An exploration of the role of ethnic and racial identities in American political life, with special attention to debates about how best to incorporate various American minority groups into the political process.

Fulfills cultural diversity requirement.

POL 290 Politics of Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Menkhaus

Survey of contemporary political conflicts, development  and international relations of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Sub-field = International and Comparative


Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Fulfills cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a requirement of the Africana Studies major.
Satisfies a requirement of the International Studies interdisciplinary minor.

POL 347 Politics of Development
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Menkhaus

Theories of development and underdevelopment, assessment of development policies in practice, and study of political change in the Global South.

Counts toward the International Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

REL 261 African American Religious Traditions
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wills

The varied religious experiences of African Americans from pre-slavery through the Civil Rights movement.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

REL 262 Imagining American Religion
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wills

A study of how people have portrayed the religious dimension of life through works of narrative fiction. Examines the various motives - religious, political, aesthetic, or otherwise - that guide American imaginings about religion.
 

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major.
Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 365 Women in American Religion
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wills

Using biographies and autobiographies of women from various periods and traditions of American religion, this course will explore women's roles in those traditions and the conventions through which those women have been portrayed.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

 

REL 444 Black and Womanist Theology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Foley

A study of African American theological writings written since the Black Power movement of the 1960s. Black theology refers typically to works written or inspired by theologian James H. Cone. Womanist theology describes a theology written specifically by and for African American women.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

SOC 105 Race, Religion, & Donald Trump
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

The purpose of this course is to gain appreciation for sociological analysis at the intersection of race-ethnicity and religion through the life experience of Barack Obama.  We will consider a number of topics including the broader and complex effects of race and identity, politics and globalization, faith and community, economics and financial pressures, citizenship and public life, prejudice and discrimination, media and technology, as well as celebrity and symbolic leadership.


Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 205 Race and Ethnic Relations
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti

Comparative and historical study of social processes related to racial and ethnic differences in modern complex societies. Readings in theoretical and descriptive literature, focusing on issues of unequal distribution of power and privilege, racism, and ethnic prejudice.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.  
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 227 Hip Hop and Urban Sociology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

Our goal in this course is to interrogate some of the most pressing social problems that face urban Americans, paying particular attention to racial minorities who live in the most impoverished sections. We do so by comparing representations of these locales in hip hop music with social scientific research. We will cover four topics: economic inequality; housing and residential segregation; violence, crime, and punishment; and intimate life.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 228 Sociology of Cities and Urban Life
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

Today, most of the world's people dwell in urban areas, and there is every indication that the future will be dominated by cities. Increasingly, then, the study of society is the study of urban society. Some of the principal questions of urban sociology are: (1) how and why cities come into being, (2) why they tend to become organized in particular ways, (3) how they are structured internally, (4) how people living in cities interact with one another, (5) how cities affect regions and individual nations, and (6) how urbanization and urbanism create different social problems.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 247 Global Development & Underdevelopment
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

This course introduces theory, research, and current debates in causes of global development and underdevelopment.  The course takes a critical and empirically grounded sociological approach.  Moreover, given the growing complexity of the international development agenda, the course material occasionally also draw from other social sciences including anthropology, economics, and political science. The course begins by tracing the historical chronology of the "development project" starting from the end of World War II to the present by focusing on changing meanings and "measures" of global development over time. The second part of the course uses case studies from Africa, Asia, and Latin America to introduce  correlates of global development and institutions that engender (or hinder) socioeconomic improvement.  Substantive topics include: international trade, globalization and global governance, state formation and democratization, the failures of foreign aid, development from below and NGOs, microfinance, gender and development, and sustainable development.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 250 Inequality in America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

Theories and comparative examples of the unequal distribution of social resources and the consequences of inequality for social life.  Analysis of class structure, social mobility, and social programs to reduce inequality.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 260 Oppression & Education (=EDU 260)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This course examines various manifestations of oppression in the United States and the questions they raise about inequality and social justice within educational institutions.  We will apply methods of critical analysis drawn from anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and psychology to an examination of social issues in the United States educational system.  We will examine education as a central site of conflict over the gap between the United States' egalitarian mission and its unequal structure, processes, and outcomes.  Students will rethink contemporary solutions to social diversity in education, develop a social justice framework which emphasizes inequality, and design an institutional ethnographic project as a critical intervention in schools and society.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 290 Oral History: Problems, Perspectives, & Possibilities (=EDU 290)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Kelly

In this hands-on methods course, students will build interdisciplinary research skills focused on the theory and practice of oral history.  We will explore the theories, methods, and debates surrounding one of the oldest research tools: oral testimony.  Students will learn to critically evaluate oral sources and use oral histories in conjunction with other forms of research.  Students will engage with the practical aspects of oral history by completing and transcribing two oral history interviews.  In addition, students will gain a sophisticated understanding of individual and collective memory and the questions that both raise for writing oral history.  Each student will participate in a class oral history project.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies
Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology
Satisfies a major requirement in CIS Educational Studies
Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement

SOC 310 Gender, Race, and Sports
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

In this course, we will examine the interrelations between gender, race, and sports. We will view sports through a sociological lens and consider how sports are shaped by and in turn shape social interaction. We will focus on how sports influence our definitions of masculinity and femininity, the opportunities and obstacles sports provide for members of different racial/ethnic and gender groups, and the images associated with race, gender, and sports. We consider why certain sports are associated with certain races, how sport is used to prove masculinity, experiences of gay athletes, Title IX and issues of gender segregation, the politics of gender verification, sports as an opportunity for upward mobility, exploitation in college sports, racial position segregation in college football, sports and violence, the criminalization of black masculinity in sports, mascots and racial imagery, and representations of race and gender in sports media.

Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies Major and Minor, Africana Studies Major and Minor, and Social Science Thought.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 312 Gender, Race and Class in Media
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course explores issues relevant to gender, race, and class in media. The course begins with the premise that all knowledge is constructed. As with other institutions, the media play a critical role in the construction of knowledge, particularly that related to our ideas about gender, race, and class. This course will mainly emphasize the representation of gender, race, and class in media.

Satisfies the Gender Studies, Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.

SOC 320 Growing Up Jim Crow (= AFR 320, EDU 320)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

Examines how a generation learned race and racism in the Age of Jim Crow.  Through multiple and intersecting lenses, students will examine texts, such as oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of various topics.  Topics will include Jim Crow schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, interracial harmony, and desegregation.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 330 Sociology of Education (=EDU 330)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

An introduction to the sociological study of education in the United States, including an examination of the school as an organization within a larger environment. Explores the link between schools and social stratification by analyzing the mutually generative functions of schools and considers how processes within schools can lead to different outcomes for stakeholders.

Satisfies the Education Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

SOC 340 Education in African American Society (=EDU 340)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This seminar explores the social and historical forces shaping the education of people of African descent in the United States from slavery to the 21st century. We will examine values, beliefs, and perspectives on education across gender and class lines, individual and group efforts toward building educational institutions and organizations, hidden or forgotten educational initiatives and programming, and cross-cultural projects to promote literacy and achievement in African American society. 

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Education Interdisciplinary Minor.
Africana Studies

SOC 371 Contemporary Race Theory
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

 

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

SOC 373 Contemporary Social Theory
Prerequisites & Notes

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only.

 

Instructor
Ewoodzie

This course is designed to provide broad overview of contemporary social theory and introduces you to the concepts, writings, and arguments of some of the most important social theorists of the 20th century. We will discuss complex interrelated cultural, social, political and economic issues and discover how social theorists have dealt with them during the decades in the 20th century when their theories were advanced. Most important, we will endeavor to understand how these issues affect our understanding of the world and the everyday lived experience. The terms and concepts we will get familiarized with are concepts such as social mechanisms, social action, social structure, as well as modernity, post-structuralism, critical theory, rational choice theory, postmodernism, and cultural studies.  

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

 

SOC 390 Qualitative Research Methods
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti, Ewoodzie

This class provides students with training in qualitative field research methods, with an emphasis on participant observation and in-depth interviewing. Students will conduct their own semester-long empirical research projects, going through the entire process of research design, data collection, coding, analysis, and writing. Readings and class sessions will focus on both theoretical foundations and techniques of interpretive, qualitative research. One of the best ways to develop research skills is to get out there and try it, to reflect on the process as you go, and to talk about what is working and not working for you with a group of colleagues and peers. Therefore, students will have extensive opportunities to reflect on their own research practices, learning by doing.

SOC 391 Survey Methodology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Deckard, Kaufman

This course introduces students to survey research methods.  Sociology is based on empirical data.  Sociologists are trained to collect data in order to answer questions.  One of the most commonly used forms of data collection within sociology is the survey.  In this course, students will gain experience in designing a survey, sampling, administering a survey, and analyzing survey data. 

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

 

SOC 392 Quantitative Data Analysis
Prerequisites & Notes

A semester of college-level introductory statistics course in Sociology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, or Mathematics, such as SOC 260, ECO 105, POL 221, or MAT 341.

Instructor
Deckard, Kaufman

The purpose of this class is to prepare you as a future producer and evaluator of high-quality quantitative research - whether as a social scientist, as a decision-maker in a corporate setting, or as a designer and evaluator of social policy. Extending theoretical concepts from introductory Social Statistics coursework, this class provides students with hands-on quantitative analysis experience using existing quantitative research. We survey, and learn to replicate and evaluate, various types of regressions, structural equation models, and longitudinal analyses. Additionally, students learn to critically engage with and evaluate social network analyses, geo-spatial analyses and mixed method research methodologies. Students will complete a capstone project that builds on their existing research, ending the semester with a manuscript able to be presented at a formal conference.


Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 430 Race and Religious Faith
Prerequisites & Notes

Third or fourth year standing and permission of the instructor.

Instructor 
Marti

The seminar focuses on the historic Black Church in America as well as religion and migration among non-native, ethnic congregations (whether church, temple, or mosque) in order to examine the relations between race-ethnicity, religion, and broader civic society today. The course also examines the rare achievement of multi-ethnic/multi-racial religious communities. The broader and complex effects of politics and globalization, economics and financial pressures, citizenship and public life, prejudice and discrimination, media and technology, innovations and social change will be discussed throughout the course.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

SPA 344 Latino Culture in the U.S.
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Spring)

Instructor
González

This survey course explores the development of a distinctly Latina/o culture in the U.S. Topics covered include: the changing nature of geographic and economic borders from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century; the history and legacy of racism and xenophobia; the construction of canons; the politics of bilingualism; Chicana and Latina feminisms; culturally specific manifestations of gender and sexuality; and the exoticization and marginalization of Latina/o culture. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area III for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.