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Sub CRSE Title
ARB 328 Gender & Sexuality in Syrian Television Drama
Prerequisites & Notes

ARB 202 or permission of instructor.

Instructor
Joubin

In this course, which is conducted entirely in Arabic, we will study how many Syrian screenwriters involved in pre-uprising television drama managed to question the very foundation of regime legitimacy. We will study how prior to the 2011, in order to achieve the goal of prompting critique and change, Syrian television drama used the lens of gender and sexuality as a major trope. Since the 2011 uprising, moreover, screenwriters have become more explicit and less reliant on gender metaphors for critique and political engagement. Those screenwriters outwardly embracing the regime narrative eschew politics in their gender constructions and instead focus on reform of societal norms. Throughout the course, we will use Youtube clips to examine debates among cultural producers on the direction of Syrian television drama since the uprising.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in Arab Studies through the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Arab Studies.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Middle East Studies.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

CIS 150 Revolutionary Literature & Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Rigger

Globalize your semester with a collaborative, comparative look into the history of two world-changing historical events:  the Russian Revolution (100 years old in October 2017) and Japan's 19th century Meiji Restoration.  While the material we will study comes from the past, the course will use cutting-edge digital tools borrowed from the information revolution that is reshaping our world today. 

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

CIS 230 Seminar in Applied Research Design and Data Analysis
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Sellers

In this course students will work with an external partner on an applied research project and explore how that work can strengthen and deepen their liberal arts education. The projects will vary in nature and involve a combination of the following: helping the partner figure out questions to ask about a product, topic, or market; collecting data for a particular project or question; organizing or cleaning messy data; analyzing data with a range of statistical methods; and presenting the results of analysis through visualization or other methods.

Teams of 3-4 students will work on each partner's project. This work will use students' existing skills and knowledge, but also require students to learn new abilities. Indeed, a central course goal is teaching students how to learn on their own and respond nimbly to unexpected needs and challenges - which will definitely arise while working on the external partner's project. During the semester, students will also improve their ability to collaborate with their team and the external partner. By the end of the semester, each student team will produce a concrete product for the external partner, such as a market analysis with research questions to explore, an original dataset with accompanying summary, or a visualization of sophisticated data analysis.

The course is also intended to help students understand and experience how some of the core attributes of a liberal arts education - critical thinking, creativity, intellectual dexterity, appreciation of competing viewpoints, effective communication - can be applied, strengthened, and deepened in their work beyond campus. The external partner projects will require students to use these attributes in multiple ways. In addition, two assignments will require students to reflect on this interaction between the project work and a liberal arts education. These reflections will deepen the students' learning, while helping the College understand how these applied research experiences can enhance a liberal arts education.

While no specific courses are required as prerequisites, students enrolling in the seminar should have some prior experience in designing research projects, creating data sets, conducting statistical analysis, or visualizing data.

CIS 230-250 Special Topics Classes
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Topics and course numbers announced in advance of registration.

CIS 330 Special Topics Seminar (CIS 330-350)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Topics and course numbers announced in advance of registration.

CIS 331 Applied Values Theory
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Layman

In this hands-on course, students will examine different notions of "value" and apply them through a final product design project.  Guest speakers, including professors and practitioners across disciplines and industries, will guide the class through critical analyses of economic, cultural, aesthetic, political, social, sentimental, and other forms of value.  Students will debate which value systems have historically and currently taken precedence in various communities.  After a survey of these value systems. students will work in teams to collaboratively design a product of their choosing and will receive mentors from the community to assist in maximizing a project's value.

CIS 395 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

CIS 495 Thesis/Capstone
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Lozada

Required weekly common meetings for all CIS majors.

CIS 496 Thesis/Capstone
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Lozada

Required weekly common meetings for all CIS majors.