Classics Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
PHI 105 Ancient Greek Philosophy
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Studtmann

Introduction to the origins and development of philosophy in ancient Greece, with special emphasis on Plato and Aristotle.

Counts towards the satisfaction of the Philosophy major requirement to take two courses from amoung PHI 105, PHI 106, and PHI 107.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

Counts as a Western Europe area course in the International Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.

Counts towards the major in Classics.

POL 202 Classical Political Theory

Instructor
Ahrensdorf

Through a study of works by Aristophanes, Plato, and Aristotle, this course examines the Socratic revolution in the history of thought, why Socrates founded political philosophy, and the radical challenge that classical political philosophy poses to modern and contemporary political thought.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. Counts towards the major in Classics.

REL 130 Introduction to the New Testament
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to juniors or seniors until Drop/Add or to students who have taken Religion 230 or 231.

This course may be applied towards a Classics major.

Instructor
Snyder

Who was Jesus of Nazareth? How were traditions about him remembered, gathered, and put in literary form? How different are the individual gospels? What were the issues that Paul addressed as he wrote to the churches he founded? How should we understand the Book of Revelation? How (and when) did all these writings come to form the collection now known as the New Testament? These are a few of the questions to be explored.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 231 Paul: the Renegade Apostle

Instructor
Snyder

Paul is now enshrined in Christian history and dogma, yet few people realize how controversial his original message was. Many of Jesus’s first followers were suspicious of Paul and there were fierce and public debates over his “gospel.”  By a careful inspection of his letters we’ll explore these debates and seek to understand the nature of the little groups he founded in cities around the Mediterranean. Some of these groups survived, and some disappeared: what held them together? Why would someone be drawn to Paul and his preaching? What was appealing about the life of these groups? The goal is to understand Paul and his theological ideas in their first-century context.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

This course may be applied towards a Classics major.

REL 242 The Rise of Christianity

Prerequisites & Notes
This course may be applied towards a Classics major.

Instructor
Foley

The theological and historical development of the early church from the New Testament period to the Council of Chalcedon (451 C.E.) with a focus on early controversies as revealed through primary sources.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 341 Religions of the Roman Empire
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome.

This course is also cross-listed with Classics and could be applied towards a Classics major.

Instructor
Snyder

An examination of public cult under the Roman Empire: sacrifices, divination, priesthoods and holidays, as well as the religious groups devoted to Isis, Mithras, Moses and Christ.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 345 Early Christian Texts on Poverty

Prerequisites & Notes
This course is also cross-listed with Classics and could be applied towards a Classics major.

Students at all levels welcome.

Instructor
Foley

This course examines early Christian discussions about the poor, the role of almsgiving in Christian life and the problems-as well as the possibilities-of wealth. Texts to be studied include relevant selections from the Christian Bible, The Shepherd of Hermas, 2 Clement, Cyprian On Works and Alms, Augustine’s Enchiridion, John Chrysostom’s sermons and other relevant Christian texts written before the modern period. This course will also attempt to put these early Christian texts in dialogue with modern debates on poverty and economic inequality.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.