Faculty

The English Department has 16 full-time faculty members specializing in a broad range of topics, and each of us holds a Ph.D. or M.F.A. Through a gift of Davidson alumnus John McGee, the college hosts a writer in residence for one semester of each academic year. The McGee Professor is an outstanding writer of national stature, whether a poet, fiction writer, essayist, playwright, screenwriter, or filmmaker. While on campus, McGee Professors teach writing classes, help direct senior honor theses, and contribute to the life of the college through readings and other appearances.

Shireen Campbell

Shireen Campbell
Ph.D. Tulane University

My teaching interests include young adult fiction, multicultural children's literature, and contemporary women writers, and I teach several writing courses, including creative nonfiction, memoir, professional writing, and writing with the community. I founded the Writing Center in 1995 and serve as co-director.

Suzanne Churchill

Suzanne Churchill
Ph.D. Princeton University

I specialize in modern British and American poetry, modernism, periodical studies, gender and sexuality, and literature and the visual arts.

Brent Dawson

Brent Dawson
Ph.D. Emory University

I specialize in English Renaissance literature. My teaching interests also include global studies, gender and sexuality, and literary theory.

Maria Fackler

Maria Fackler
Ph.D. Yale University

I specialize in 20th and 21st-century British literature.

Brenda Flanagan

Brenda Flanagan
Ph.D. University of Michigan

Known internationally for dramatic presentations of my stories and poems, I teach creative writing, Caribbean and African-American literature, as well as literary analysis. 

Gabriel Ford

Gabriel Ford
Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University

I am a medievalist specializing in 12th- to 15th-century English, French, and Latin literatures. I also teach writing, gender and sexuality studies, and English language history and grammar.

Ann Fox

Ann M. Fox
Ph.D. Indiana University, Bloomington

My teaching interests include modern and contemporary drama, disability in drama and literature, feminist theatre, contemporary American multicultural drama, performance theory, and women writers. My research specializes in 20th- and 21st-century dramatic literature and disability studies in visual and performance cultures.

Randy Ingram

Randy Ingram
Ph.D. Emory University

I specialize in early modern English literature. 

Zoran Kuzmanovich

Zoran Kuzmanovich (Chair)
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin

I teach courses in American and comparative literature, literary criticism, and film.

Cynthia Lewis

Cynthia Lewis
Ph.D. Harvard University

I've been teaching at Davidson for more than 30 years, and my fields are early modern British literature and creative nonfiction.

Christine Marshall

Christine Marshall
Ph.D. University of Utah

I teach courses in 20th-century American poetry and Medieval and Renaissance literature.

Annie Ingram

Annie Merrill
Ph.D. Emory University

I'm an Americanist who specializes in 19th-century literature and rambles over more extensive interdisciplinary territory, including ecocriticism, environmental literature, American studies, ethnic American literatures, and gender studies.

Paul Miller

Paul Miller
Ph.D. Ohio State University

I specialize in nonfiction writing, film, and literary theory. I'm also co-director of the Writing Center.

Elizabeth Mills

Elizabeth Mills
Ph.D. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

I specialize in American literature, with a particular focus on poetry and literature of the American South. I also teach multiple courses on literature by women. 

Randy Nelson

Randy Nelson
Ph.D. Princeton University

I'm an Americanist with a special interest in fiction.

Alan Parker

Alan Michael Parker
M.F.A. Columbia University School of the Arts

I'm a poet and a novelist and I've taught writing at Davidson College for more than 15 years.   

Onita Vaz-Hooper

Onita Vaz
Ph.D University of Southern California

I specialize in 18th and 19th-century British Literature, particularly Romanticism. My teaching interests also include colonial/postcolonial literature, textual criticism, canon-formation, and literature and medicine.