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Genomics Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
BIO 201 Genetics
Prerequisites & Notes

BIO 111/113 is required.  BIO 112/114, CHE 115, and/or CHE 250 is recommended.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructors 
El Bejjani, Hales, Sarafova

Integration of molecular and classical genetics, including the physical nature of genetic material, the many levels of gene and genome regulation, transmission of genetic information and patterns of inheritance, gene mapping/identification via traditional and modern methods, and genetic engineering in many contexts.

BIO 202 Microbiology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
Wessner

An introduction to the diverse world of microbes.  Topics include the structure, metabolism, identification, and genetics of archaeons, bacteria, and viruses.  Special emphasis is placed on interactions between microbes and humans, both in terms of pathogenesis and biotechnology.  Laboratory focuses on isolating, identifying, and characterizing bacteria and viruses using a series of classical and molecular techniques.

BIO 208 Cell Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.  Students with credit for BIO 238 may not enroll in BIO 208.

Instructor
Bernd

Examination of the multitude of coordinated interactions that must occur between sub-cellular compartments for a cell to be able to function and to respond adequately to its local environment.  Laboratory focuses on analysis of signaling and response mechanisms used by eukaryotic cells and includes student-designed research projects. 

BIO 209 Bioinformatics Programming (= CSC 209)
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students with credit for CSC 120 (= DIG 120), CSC 121, or CSC 200 (=PHY 200).  

Instructor
D. Thurtle-Schmidt

(Cross-listed as CSC 209)  An interdisciplinary introduction to computer science and structured programming using the Python programming language in the context of biological datasets and applications, including algorithms for analyzing genomic data.

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 238 Cell Biology & Signaling
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.  Students with credit for BIO 208 may not enroll in BIO 238.

Instructor
Bernd

In order to coordinate function within multicellular eukaryotic organisms, organelles and cells utilize an array of molecular transport and communication mechanisms.  Students compare wild type and altered signaling from phenotype to changes in the signaling mechanism.  Examples draw from human genetic variation and changes due to exposure to environmental toxicants.  No laboratory.

BIO 240 Biostatistics for Life Scientists
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, or ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.   

Instructors
Peroni, Pittman, K. Smith

Probability, descriptive statistics, and proper application, interpretation, and reporting of inferential statistics for biological research.  Instruction in experimental design and use of statistical and graphics software. Recommended for pre-med and pre-veterinary students as well as those who plan to enroll in Biology group investigation or independent study courses.

Satisfies Mathematical & Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the methodology course requirement for the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 303 Biochemistry
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113, BIO 112/114, and CHE 250 are required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
Thurtle-Schmidt

Introduction to the principles of biochemistry.  Emphasis is placed on enzymology, structure of biomolecules, and cellular metabolism.  Laboratory emphasizes  enzyme purification and characterization.

BIO 306 Developmental Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.  BIO 201 or 208/238 recommended.  Not open to students with credit for BIO 336.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
Lom

Investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development covering topics such as fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, axis specification, and organogenesis via analysis of classical and modern experiments.  Laboratory sessions emphasize experimental manipulations of early embryos culminating in student-designed research projects.

BIO 307 Immunology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113, CHE 115, and one of the following: BIO 201, 202, or 208/238 are required.  Not open to students with credit for BIO 337.  Limited to juniors and seniors or permission of instructor.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
Sarafova

Introduction to the immune system with an emphasis on mammalian models.  Course focuses on the cellular and molecular levels of the immune system in health and disease.  Topics include recognition of antigens, development of lymphocyte repertoires, and adaptive immune responses.

BIO 309 Genomics
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful compeletion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 and one of the following: BIO 201, 202, 208/238, 209, 303, 306/336, 307/337, 333, or 343 are required.  Satisfies group A only in combination with BIO 343.

Instructor
M. Campbell

Students use published resources to understand how genome-scale information (e.g., DNA sequences, genome variations, transcriptomes, proteomes, and clinical studies) can provide a systems biology perspective. Students also use databases and bioinformatics tools to analyze data and post their analyses online.  May be taken simultaneously with BIO 343.

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 331 Behavioral Neuroscience (= PSY 303)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of PSY 101 or BIO 111/113 and 112/114 as well as permission of the instructor are required. 

Instructor
Ramirez

(Cross-listed as PSY 303)  Role of the nervous system; sensory and motor mechanism; physiological bases of motivation and emotion; sleep and arousal; and physiological bases of learning, memory, and language.  Extensive laboratory training.  Work with animals is required.

BIO 332 Functional Neuroanatomy (= PSY 324)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 303 (=Biology 331) or Psychology 289 and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Ramirez

(Cross-listed as PSY 324)  Intensive readings in molecular neurobiology, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and/or behavior.  Students: 1) make classroom presentations of critical analyses of the course readings; 2) conduct laboratory research or hospital rounds; and 3) submit an annotated bibliography and a write-up of the laboratory project or term paper.

BIO 333 Cellular & Molecular Neuroscience
Prerequisites & Notes

BIO 111/113 and one of the following: BIO 201 (strongly recommended), 208/238, 306/336, 309, or 331 are required.  Not open to first-year students.  Satisfies Group A.

Instructor
El  Bejjani

An advanced examination of neurons at the cellular and molecular levels. Topics include the structure of neurons and glia, neurogenesis, synapse formation, and the molecular basis of neuronal signaling and communication. Special attention is paid to nervous system development, degeneration, and the molecular basis of common neurological disorders. Laboratory projects examine cell signaling events that shape neuron morphology.

BIO 336 Animal Development
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required with BIO 201 and/or 208/238 recommended.  Students with credit for BIO 306 may not enroll in BIO 336.

Instructor
Lom

Investigates cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development from fertilization to organogenesis, emphasizing classical and modern experiments.  No laboratory

BIO 343 Laboratory Methods in Genomics
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, plus one of the following:  BIO 201, 202, 208/238, 209, 303, 306/336, 307/337, 309, or 333 are required.  Satisfies group A only in combination with BIO 309.

Instructor
M. Campbell

In this lab-only course, students participate in a real genome sequencing project (sequencing performed off-site).  Students analyze sequences and annotate genes in the genome.  This original research is computer intensive and contributes to the growing body of knowledge in genomics.  Students participate in collaborative research projects and generate reports of their findings.  May be taken simultaneously with BIO 309.

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 355 Genome Editing
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 is required.

Instructor
El Bejjani

Very recently revolutionary new techniques made it possible to edit the genomes of living organisms directly.  Scientists can now, theoretically, engineer any living cell in very specific manners.  This group investigation course explores the technical literature on genome editing and current uses of the methods in research and in the repair of genetic diseases.  In parallel, students design experiments to edit the genome of C. elegans animals and engineer worms for research purposes. 

BIO 363 Human Genetics
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 201 and permission of the instructor are required.

Instructor
Hales

This upper-level seminar focuses on different human genetic disorders with primary research papers as the main resource.  Students explore 1) the methods by which the genes associated with each disorder were identified; 2) the biology of the disorder at the organism, tissue, cell, and molecular level; and 3) strategies to treat each condition with gene therapy and other methods.

BIO 391 RNA Worlds
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 201 or permission of the instructor is required.

Instructor
Raymond

Non-protein-coding ribonucleic acids (RNAs) serve as genomes, catalysts, adaptors, regulators, structural components, and evolutionary substrates to control a diverse range of biological processes in all three domains of life.  In this seminar course, discussions of primary literature and subsequent writing assignments reveal and explore our current understanding of the evolution and roles of non-coding RNAs.

BIO 395 Biochemistry Seminar (= CHE 430)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 303, CHE 230, or permission of instructor is required. 

Instructors
Myers, Sarafova

This advanced seminar course examines selected topics in biochemistry by examining primary literature.

CHE 230 Introduction to Biological Chemistry
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 115 and 250. One laboratory meeting per week. (Fall and Spring)

Instructors
Myers, Offermann

Introduction to the chemistry of biological systems.  Includes the study of amino acids and proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, carbohydrates, enzymes and enzyme mechanisms, and the chemistry of important metabolic pathways and regulatory mechanisms.


Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.

 

CHE 330 Experimental Biological Chemistry
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 230.  Biology 111 recommended. One laboratory meeting per week. (Fall)

Instructor 
Myers

Chemistry and mechanisms of gene expression, signal transduction, and advanced metabolism.

CHE 360 Experimental Physical Chemistry
Prerequisites & Notes

Mathematics 113 or 140. One laboratory meeting per week. (Not offered 2016-17, offered every two years)

Instructors
Blauch, Striplin

This in-depth course covers quantum mechanics and its application to spectroscopy and the structure of matter.

CHE 374 Medicinal Chemistry
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 250. No laboratory. (Fall)

Instructor
E. Stevens

Chemical basis of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical development. Topics include drug discovery, pharmacokinetics (delivery of a drug to the site of its action), pharmacodynamics (mode of action of the drug), drug metabolism, and patent issues that affect the development and manufacture of pharmaceuticals.

CHE 375 Immunology and Immunopharmacology
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 250 and 230; Chemistry 330, or Biology 208 and 303, strongly recommended. (Spring)

Instructor
N. Snyder

Introduction to immunology and immunopharmacology, including mechanisms of immunity, and the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases and immune disorders. A strong emphasis will be placed on the design and development of therapeutics, including protein and carbohydrate-based vaccines.

Satisfies a major requirement in Chemistry.
Satisfies requirement in the Biochemistry interdisciplinary minor.

CHE 430 Seminar in Biological Chemistry (=BIO 395)
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 330, or by permission of the instructor; Biology 111. No laboratory. (Spring)

Instructor
Myers

Advanced topics in biochemistry related to instructor's areas of interest and expertise. Serves as a capstone course for the Chemistry Major with an Emphasis in Biochemistry and the Biochemistry Interdisciplinary Minor.

CHE 450 Seminar in Organic Chemistry
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 350. No laboratory. (Spring)

Instructors
Carroll, Snyder, E. Stevens

Advanced topics in organic chemistry related to instructor's areas of interest and expertise.

CSC 200 Computational Physics (= PHY 200)
Prerequisites & Notes

Physics 120 or 130 at Davidson, or permission of the instructor.  (Spring)

Instructor
Kuchera

(Cross-listed as PHY 200) PHY/CSC 200 is an introduction to computer programming and computational physics using Python. No prior programming experience is necessary. This course will provide students with the skills required to write code to solve physics problems in areas including quantum physics, electromagnetism, and mechanics. Structured programming methods will be covered as well as algorithms for numerical integration, solving differential equations, and more.
 

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

Co-requisite: Physics 120 or 130 at Davidson or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

CSC 209 Bioinformatics Programming (= BIO 209)
Prerequisites & Notes

Does not carry Mathematics major credit. Not open to students with credit for CSC 120 (=DIG 120), CSC 121 or CSC 200 (= PHY 200).  (Fall) 

Instructor
D. Thurtle-Schmidt

(Cross-listed as Biology 209.) An interdisciplinary introduction to computer science and structured programming using the Python programming language in the context of biological datasets and applications, including algorithms for analyzing genomic data.  

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

CSC 220 Discrete Structures (= MAT 220)
Prerequisites & Notes

MAT 140, MAT 150, or MAT 160, and the ability to program in a high-level language such as Python, C++, or Java at the level expected in CSC 121 or an equivalent course.

Instructor
Staff

(Cross-listed as MAT 220) An introduction to proof techniques, with a focus on topics relevant to computer science. Topics include: fundamental proof techniques, boolean logic, sequences and summations, set theory, algorithm analysis, recursion, mathematical induction, recurrence relations, an introduction to number theory, combinatorics, discrete probability, and graph theory. The class will be adequate preparation for students choosing to continue on the pure math track (Real Analysis, Abstract Algebra, etc.) or the theoretical computer science track (Analysis of Algorithms, Theory of Computation, etc.).

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Counts towards the Mathematics major and minor.
Counts towards the Computer Science major and minor.

 

 

CSC 221 Data Structures
Prerequisites & Notes

Computer Science 121, 200, 209, or permission of instructor.

Instructor
Staff

A study of abstract data types, including lists, stacks, queues, and search tables, and their supporting data structures, including arrays, linked lists, binary search trees, and hash tables.  Implications of the choice of data structure on the efficiency of the implementation of an algorithm.  Efficient methods of sorting and searching.

Counts towards the Mathematics major and minor.
Counts towards the Computer Science major and minor.
Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

CSC 321 Analysis of Algorithms
Prerequisites & Notes

CSC 221 and CSC/MAT 220, or permission of instructor. 

Instructor
Staff

Algorithm design strategies, including greedy, divide-and-conquer, and dynamic programming methods.  Advanced data structures, including balanced search trees, graphs, heaps, and priority queues.  Advanced methods of searching and sorting.  Computational complexity and analysis of algorithms.  NP-complete problems.

Counts towards the Mathematics major and minor.
Counts towards the Computer Science major and minor.

CSC 322 Programming Languages
Prerequisites & Notes

Computer Science 221.

Instructor
Staff
 
Principles of programming languages, including lexical and syntactic analysis, semantics, types, functions and parameters, and memory management.  Programming paradigms, drawn from imperative, object-oriented, functional, and logical programming languages.  

CSC 362 Data Visualization
Prerequisites & Notes

Prerequisite: CSC 221. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

Does not carry Mathematics major credit. 

Instructor
Peck

An introduction to the theory and application of graphical representations of data. Topics include: the human visual system, low-level vision processing, attentive vs. preattentive processes, color vision and color map design, interaction, space perception, and visualization design.

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

CSC 370 Artificial Intelligence
Prerequisites & Notes

CSC 221 and one of MAT 220, 230, or 255; or permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Ramanujan

An introduction to the theory, principles, and techniques of Artificial Intelligence. Topics include search, game playing, constraint satisfaction problems, planning, reinforcement learning, knowledge representation, logic, and natural language processing.

Counts towards the Mathematics major and minor.
Counts towards the Computer Science major and minor.

CSC 371 Machine Learning
Prerequisites & Notes

Proficiency in a high-level programming language and data structures, at the level expected in CSC 221, and MAT/CSC 220 (or permission of the instructor). 

Offered Spring of even-numbered years.

A survey of the field of machine learning, with an introduction to the fundamental algorithms in the field and the theory underpinning them. Topics include techniques for regression, classification, ensemble methods, and dimensionality reduction.

Counts towards the Mathematics major and minor.
Counts towards the Computer Science major and minor.
Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

CSC 397 Independent Study in Advanced Software Development in Science (= PHY 397)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

(Cross-listed as Physics 397.) Independent study using computers to model dynamical systems in the natural sciences under the direction and supervision of the instructor who approves the specific topic of study.  Emphasis is on the use of object-oriented programming and web-based protocols to investigate both dynamical systems and the representation of those systems as data structures and algorithms.

EDU 241 Child Development (= PSY 241)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101. (Fall)

Instructor 
Leyva

(Cross-listed as Psychology 241.) Research and theory on the cognitive, socio-emotional and physical changes in development from prenatal through middle childhood.  Emphasis on how culture shapes child development and applications to educational settings.  Four-hour observations at an after-school program are required.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 
 

EDU 243 Adolescent Development (= PSY 243)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101

Instructor
Staff

(Cross-listed as Psychology 243.)  An in-depth examination of specific theories, concepts, and methods related to the period of adolescence. Students will explore a wide range of topics including: cognitive development, moral development, identity formation, gender role, social relationships, and the effects of culture on adolescent development.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

MAT 210 Mathematical Modeling
Prerequisites & Notes

Mathematics 140 or 150 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

Instructor
Staff

A survey of discrete mathematical modeling techniques and their application to the natural and social sciences. Mathematical tools are selected from Monte Carlo simulation, queuing theory, Markov Chains, optimization, discrete dynamical systems, artificial intelligence, and game theory. Emphasis is on formulating models, investigating them analytically and computationally, and communicating the results.

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

MAT 220 Discrete Structures (= CSC 220)
Prerequisites & Notes

MAT 140, MAT 150, or MAT 160, and the ability to program in a high-level language such as Python, C++, or Java at the level expected in CSC 121 or an equivalent course.

An introduction to proof techniques, with a focus on topics relevant to computer science.  Topics include: fundamental proof techniques, boolean logic, sequences and summations, set theory, algorithm analysis, recursion, mathematical induction, recurrence relations, an introduction to number theory, combinatorics, discrete probability, and graph theory.  The class will be adequate preparation for students choosing to continue on the pure math track (Real Analysis, Abstract Algebra, etc) or the theoretical computer science track (Analysis of Algorithms, Theory of Computation, etc.).

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Counts towards the Mathematics major and minor.
Counts towards the Computer Science major and minor.

MAT 235 Differential Equations
Prerequisites & Notes

Mathematics 150. (Fall)

Instructor
Staff

A study of solution techniques and models in ordinary differential equations including first order equations, linear differential equations, series solutions, Laplace transform methods, and concepts of numerical and graphical techniques applied to equations and systems. 

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

MAT 340 Probability
Prerequisites & Notes

Mathematics 140 or 160. (Fall)

Instructor
Staff

A study of probability theory relative to both discrete and continuous probability laws. Topics include independence and dependence, mean, variance and expectation, random variables, jointly distributed probability laws, Chebysheff's Inequality and a version of the Central Limit Theorem. Applications of probability theory are approached through a variety of idealized problems.

MAT 341 Mathematical Statistics
Prerequisites & Notes

Mathematics 340. (Spring)
 


 

Instructor
Staff

A mathematical approach to statistical theory. Includes a study of distribution theory, important properties of estimators, interval estimation and hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and selected topics from non-parametric statistics.

Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

MAT 360 Topology
Prerequisites & Notes

One of Mathematics 220, 230, or 255. (Offered Spring of even-numbered years.)

Instructor
Staff

An introduction to metric and topological spaces. Topics include concepts of completeness, compactness, connectedness, fixed point theorems, knot theory, and classification of surfaces. 

PHY 200 Computational Physics (= CSC 200)
Prerequisites & Notes

Co-requisite: Physics 120 or 130 at Davidson or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

Instructor
Kuchera

(Cross-listed as CSC 200) This course is an introduction to computer programming and computational physics using Python. No prior programming experience is necessary. This course will provide students with the skills required to write code to solve physics problems in areas including quantum physics, electromagnetism, and mechanics. Structured programming methods will be covered as well as algorithms for numerical integration, solving differential equations, and more.

Satisfies a requirement int he Data Science interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

 

 

PHY 201 Mathematical Methods for Scientists
Prerequisites & Notes

Mathematics 113 or 140. (Spring)

Instructor
Belloni

Designed to develop a basic competence in many areas of mathematics needed for junior/senior level work in the sciences. Basic methods of power series, complex numbers, Fourier analysis, linear algebra, ordinary and partial differential equations, multivariable and vector calculus covered clearly and carefully but without detailed proofs. Symbolic computation and scientific visualization tools used as appropriate.  May not be taken for major credit in the senior year.

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.

PHY 310 Electronics and Instrumentation
Prerequisites & Notes

Physics 220 or 230. (Fall)

Instructor
Yukich

Theoretical and laboratory investigations of analog and digital circuits including diodes, transistors, operational amplifiers, and logic gates.  Incorporation of these components in power supplies, oscillators, amplifiers, microcomputer systems, computers and other instruments.  Introduction to assembly language and LabVIEW programming provided.  Two laboratory periods each week.

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.

PHY 397 Independent Study in Advanced Software Development in Science (= CSC 397)
Prerequisites & Notes

CSC/PHY 200 or CSC 121 and one of PHY 310, CSC 231 or CSC 325, or permission of the instructor. (Fall/Spring)

Instructor
Kuchera

(Cross-listed as Computer Science 397) Independent study using computers to model dynamical systems in the natural sciences under the direction and supervision of the instructor who approves the specific topic of study. Emphasis is on the use of object-oriented programming and web-based protocols to investigate both dynamical systems and the representation of those systems as data structures and algorithms.

PHY 415 Optics and Lasers
Prerequisites & Notes

Physics 350 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

Instructor
Yukich

Applications of electromagnetic theory to modern optics and lasers. Topics include electromagnetic wave propagation and superposition, optical elements and devices, Fourier transforms, diffraction, polarization, interference, and coherence theory. Specific applications are made to lasers, spectrometers, interferometers, and optical systems.

PSY 241 Child Development (=EDU 241)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor
Leyva

(Cross-listed as Educational Studies 241.)  Research and theory on the cognitive, socio-emotional and physical changes in development from prenatal through middle childhood.  Emphasis on how culture shapes child development and applications to educational settings.   Four-hour observations at an after-school program are required.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 243 Adolescent Development (= EDU 243)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor 
Staff

(Cross-listed as Educational Studies 243.) An in-depth examination of specific theories, concepts, and methods related to the period of adolescence. Students will explore a wide range of topics including: cognitive development, moral development, identity formation, gender role, social relationships, and the effects of culture on adolescent development. 

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 245 Psychology of Aging
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor
Multhaup

Introduction to human aging from a psychological perspective. Adult age-related changes in memory, intelligence, wisdom, personality, etc. Attitudes toward aging and adjustment to aging. Emphasis on the application of scientific methods to the study of aging.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 276 Cognitive Psychology
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructors 
Multhaup, Munger 

Introduction to cognitive psychology. Structure and processes underlying cognition including perception, memory, attention, language, problem solving, imagery, etc. Emphasis on theories and empirical evidence for understanding cognition. 

Satisfies the Social- Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 282 Learning
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructors
Ramirez, Smith

Overview of major topics in learning: elicitation, classical conditioning, reinforcement, punishment, problem solving, behavioral economics, and verbal behavior. Focus on empirical data, research methodology, and technologies generated from learning research.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 284 Drugs and Behavior
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor
Smith, Robinson

The course examines the effects of drugs on human and animal behavior. Consideration is also given to the physiological effects of drugs on the central nervous system. Methods for preventing and treating drug abuse are also addressed. Students with credit in Psychology 302 may not enroll in Psychology 284. 

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

PSY 301 Psychological Research-Perception and Attention
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor
Munger

Research methods, concepts, and empirical findings in perception and attention are examined in lecture and extensive laboratory experience. Course explores how a physical stimulus impinges on sense organs and is subsequently processed and understood by perceptual systems (e.g., how do we "see" things?). Participation in research as subjects and experimenters is required.  Recommended completion by Fall of senior year for majors.

PSY 302 Psychological Research-Behavioral Pharmacology
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor
Smith

Students conduct experiments on the effects of drugs on human and animal behavior. Scientific writing is a strong focus in this course, with students writing research reports on each experiment. Students are required to propose a novel line of research in the form of a research proposal. Studies conducted in other behavioral pharmacology laboratories are discussed and critiqued. Some work with animals is required. Students with credit in Psychology 284 may not enroll in Psychology 302.  Recommended completion by Fall, senior year, for majors.

PSY 303 Psychological Research-Behavioral Neuroscience (= BIO 331)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101 or Biology 111/113 and Biology 112/114, and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Ramirez

(Cross-listed as Biology 331.) Role of the nervous system; sensory and motor mechanism; physiological bases of motivation and emotion; sleep and arousal; and physiological bases of learning, memory, and language. Extensive laboratory training.  Work with animals is required.  Recommended completion by Fall of senior year for majors.

PSY 304 Psychological Research-Memory
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.

Instructor
Multhaup

Research methods, concepts, and empirical findings in the field of memory are explored in lecture and extensive laboratory experience. Emphasis is on human memory. Participation in research as subjects and experimenters is required.  Recommended completion by Fall of senior year for majors.

PSY 310 Psychological Research-Design and Analysis
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 101.  (Fall and Spring)

Instructors 
Boyd, Tonidandel

Introduction to psychological research. Descriptive, correlational, and experimental methods of research will be examined. Primary focus on data analysis including descriptive statistics and inferential statistics with emphasis on analysis of variance. Mandatory weekly computer lab.  Recommended in the sophomore/junior year for majors.

PSY 324 Functional Neuroanatomy (= BIO 332)
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 303 (=Biology 331)  or Psychology 289 and permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Ramirez

(Cross-listed as Biology 332.) Intensive readings in molecular neurobiology, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and/or behavior. Students: 1) make classroom presentations of critical analyses of the course readings; 2) conduct laboratory research or hospital rounds; and 3) submit an annotated bibliography and a write-up of the laboratory project or term paper. 

For Psychology majors this meets the major's seminar requirement. 
For Interdisciplinary Minors in Neuroscience, this course satisfies the interdisciplinary minor requirement as stated in Interdisciplinary Minor in Neuroscience (Requirements, section 1b).