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Global Literary Theory Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
AFR 282 African American Literature: 18th - 19th Century (=ENG 282)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

African American Literature from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 286 African American Literature: 1900- (=ENG 286)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

This course will introduce students to twentieth- and twenty-first century African American literature and literary criticism. It will bring together a wide range of readings from across genres and disciplines, attempting to sketch out the major aesthetic and political features of the black literary project. Authors will include Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Samuel R. Delany, Octavia Butler, Teju Cole, Claudia Rankine, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Fred Moten, and Colson Whitehead to name a few.

Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Counts as a humanities elective in the Africana Studies major.
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 297 Caribbean Literature (=ENG 297)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan

The Caribbean is key to any understanding of the New World. Caribbean Literature takes students beyond the islands' popular music, food, and landscapes to an understanding of the formation of cultures from Europe, Africa, and India that have produced two Nobel Laureates. In novels such as Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, we see how love leads to the death of a young woman in the attic in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. We'll understand, too, why and how Aime Cesaire rewrites Shakespeare's The Tempest to allow for the resurrection of the spirit of Caliban's mother, Sycorax. Students do not need to know theory to take this course.  

Students may retake this course for credit when the topic/readings change with instructor's permission.

Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 303 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: W.E.B. Du Bois (=ENG 382)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

This course will introduce students to the major works of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois. Readings will include (in chronological order): The Philadelphia Negro (1899); The Souls of Black Folk (1903); Dark Princess (1928); Black Reconstruction in America (1935); Color and Democracy (1945); and The World and Africa (1947) to name a few. They will be supplemented with secondary readings by: Booker T. Washington, Michael Rudolph West, Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Hazel Carby, Paul Gilroy, Adolph Reed, Lewis Gordon, Marina Bilbija, C. L. R. James and others.

Satisfies a requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in English.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

AFR 364 Black Paris
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fache

Black Paris focuses on the deep engagement of peoples of African descent with the City of Light from Fredrick Douglass to Ta-Nehisi Coates. We will examine the full variety of black cultures that have taken shape in dialogue with Paris, including poetry, prose, journals and magazines, music, and film in English and French by African American (J. Baldwin, Richard Wright, etc.) as well as Francophone Caribbean (F. Fanon, A. Césaire) and African (A. Mabanckou, Manu Dibango) artists and intellectuals.

Satisfies a requirement in Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies a
Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 383 Black Literary Theory (=ENG 483)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

(Cross-listed with ENG 483)

This course will bring together readings both literary and critical/theoretical, beginning with Frantz Fanon's seminal Black Skin, White Masks (1952). Taking Fanon as its point of departure, then, this course will necessarily turn to a discussion of the recent discourse on Afro-pessimism and black optimism, attempting to introduce students to important issues and questions of race, race relations, anti-black racism, black sociality, the universality of whiteness, the fungibility of the black body, and of the vulnerability and precarity of black life; and together we will think more closely about how the complex and "unthinkable" histories of slavery, colonialism, and the Middle Passage, for examples, continue to challenge the representational limits and potentialities of traditional literary genres and modes of emplotment. In addition to Fanon, authors will include Orlando Patterson, Toni Morrison, Hortense Spillers, Saidiya Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Jared Sexton, and Fred Moten.

Counts as a humanities elective for the Africana Studies major.
Counts as a senior seminar and fulfills the diversity requirement for the English major.
Counts as a literature elective for the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

ANT 341 Globalization
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Lozada

Explores globalization and the social and cultural processes transforming local life throughout the world. Introduction to the impact of global capitalism, transnational culture and political flows, and the role of global non-government organizations in different regions. Topics include global capitalism, state power and sovereignty, diaspora ethnicity and migration, and the localization of transnational culture.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ARB 321 Contemporary Arabic Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Arabic 202 or permission of instructor.

Instructor
Joubin

Advanced readings of novels by contemporary Arab authors such as: Ilyas Khouri, Naguib Mahfouz, Abdel Rahman al-Munif, Salwa Bakr, Ghassan Kanafani, Tawfiq Hakim, and Hanan al-Shaykh.  Discussion topics include: modernity, civil war in Lebanon, gender relations, changing relations between Middle East and West, social transformations after independence, and the plight of the Palestinians.  Presentations and compositions in Arabic are among the requirements. Conducted in Arabic.

Satisfies a minor requirement in Arabic.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Counts toward the Asian Studies Interdisciplinary Minor, the Middle East Studies interdisciplinary minor, the International Studies Interdisciplinary Minor (Middle East sections), and Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirements.

ARB 340 Gender and Politics in Contemporary Syrian Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Arabic 202 or permission of instructor.

Instructor
Joubin

This course will focus on the intersection of gender and politics in contemporary Syrian literature. Through an examination of the novels, short stories, autobiography, and poems of writers such as Hana Mina, Khayri al-Dhabhabi, Asima Darwish, Muhammad al-Maghut, and Khalid Khalifeh, students will be introduced to debates on the direction of society and politics in contemporary literature. Students will also be exposed to films and mini-series based on the literature and lives of several of the writers we will be studying. The goal of the course is for students to learn to comfortably read contemporary Syrian literature, and acquire the vocabulary necessary to discuss the key issues and themes relating to gender and politics. This course is taught entirely in Arabic.

Satisfies a minor requirement in Arabic.
Satisfies a major requirement in Gender Studies.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Counts toward the Asian Studies interdisciplinary minor, the Middle East Studies interdisciplinary minor, the International Studies interdisciplinary minor (Middle East sections), and Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric distribution requirements.
 

CHI 206 Introduction to Traditional Chinese Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English. (Not offered every year.)

Instructor
Shao

Selection of poetry, drama and narrative from ancient times up to 1900, with special emphasis on major themes and conventions.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Literature distribution requirement.

CHI 228 Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English.

Instructor
Shen

This course is a survey of modern Chinese literature from around 1919 (known as the May 4th period) to the Post-Mao era.  The class functions as an introduction to modern Chinese literary works by prominent writers.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

CHI 405 Seminar: Modern Chinese Literature and Cinema
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English. May repeat for credit if the subject is different.

Instructor
V. Shen
 

Reading and discussion of selected works in Chinese literature and cinema. Discussion of individual research projects.

SPRING 2018 ONLY: Counts as a 400-level seminar course in the English major and minor.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

CHI 406 Seminar: Topics in Traditional Chinese Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English. May repeat for credit if the subject is different.

Instructor
Shao

Critical study of tales, short stories and novels from 1300 to 1900, with special attention to themes, conventions, critical approaches, and the problem of adaptation from fiction to film, theater, and cartoons.

CLA 121 Greek Literature in Translation
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternate years.)
Students at all levels welcome.
 

Instructor
Cheshire

Selected works from a variety of ancient Greek literary genres. 

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
May be applied toward a major in English.

CLA 122 Roman Literature in Translation
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome. (Spring 2018)

Instructor
Neumann

Selected works of Roman literature from the early Republic through the Empire.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the history requirement in the English major.

DIG 220 Electronic Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Sample

Love letters written by a computer. A poem two hundred trillion stanzas long. A message encoded in a microbe's DNA. The mysterious disappearance of a teenager, told through YouTube and IMs. An ocean buoy tweeting mash-ups of Moby Dick. Welcome to the weird world of electronic literature-digitally born poetic, narrative, and aesthetic works read on computers, tablets, and phones. Experimental, evocative, and sometimes simply puzzling, electronic literature challenges our assumptions about reading, writing, authorship, and meaning. Yet e-lit, as it is often called, has also profoundly influenced mainstream culture. Literature, film, comics, apps, and video games have all learned lessons from electronic literature. This course will trace the rise of electronic literature and explore both historic and contemporary works of e-lit. We'll begin with electronic literature's roots in avant-garde art and Cold War technology, and follow e-lit through the birth of the personal computer into the era of the Web and smartphone. At every step along the way the expressive power of new media-the way digital media enables and shapes different modes of creative and cultural expression-will be of particular interest to us.

Satisfies a requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement for the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 220 Literary Analysis
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor 
Staff

Designed for potential majors. Emphasizes theoretical approaches and critical strategies for the written analysis of poetry, fiction, and drama and/or film. Writing intensive. Required for the major.  Students who major in English should complete 220 by the end of the sophomore year. Those who do not meet this deadline must make special arrangements with the Chair.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 240 British Literature to 1800
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Designed for majors and prospective majors.  Introductory survey of the British literary tradition in poetry, drama, and narrative during the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Eighteenth Century, with special emphasis on Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton. 


Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.
 

 

ENG 242 Women's Work: 21st Century Female Playwrights (=THE 242)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
S. Green

This course provides a close look at work created for the stage by women since 2000.  The analysis of plays written and produced in the 21st century will be set in the context of feminist and queer theory which has offered insights into the cultural function of "tomen's work."

Satisfies a requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Theatre major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Literary & Cultural Representations Track of the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.

ENG 260 British Literature since 1800
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

English 260 will provide you with a solid historical introduction to the poetry and prose texts of a little more than two centuries of British literature, spanning Romanticism, the Victorian era, modernism, and post-1945 literature. We will focus on specific authors such as Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Oscar Wilde, T. S. Eliot, and Eavan Boland in order to study how they exemplify or complicate our understanding of literary history. 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement for the English major.

ENG 261 Modern Drama (= THE 261)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fox

European, American, and British drama from Ibsen to Pinter with emphasis on the major movements within Western theater: realism, naturalism, expressionism, Epic Theater, and Theater of the Absurd. 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 271 Disability in Literature and Art
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fox

In this course, we will explore disability as it is depicted in literary and cultural texts, from the canon to disability culture.  These representations are sometimes used metaphorically, as representations of extreme innocence or evil.  Likewise, they might reduce the experience of the disability to a conquerable challenge, or to a fate worse than death.  We will reconsider disability history, question socially defined categories of normalcy and ability, and learn about the presence of disability culture.  Rather than trying to catalogue all the examples of disability in literature, this course seeks to use disability studies as a genesis point and theoretical framework through which to examine several core questions about disability, literature, and the problems and opportunities arising from the intersection of the two.  We will reconsider representations of disability in literature; examine how disability is a culturally constructed category like race, gender, class, and sexuality (and how it intersects with those); study contemporary writing, performance, and art from disability culture; and consider how disability aesthetics can meaningfully contribute to the processes and products of artistic creation.  This course presumes no prior coursework in English and welcomes those from across the disciplines interested in studying the social and cultural experience of disability as a way to inform their own work in the arts and sciences.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirements.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

 

ENG 280 American Literature to 2000
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Nelson

Designed for majors and prospective majors.  Historical survey treating the development of American letters from the beginnings through the twentieth century.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 282 African American Literature: 18th - 19th Century (=AFR 282)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

African American Literature from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

ENG 283 Short Prose Fiction
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Nelson

Examines the history and development of the modern short story and its various subgenres through a close reading of texts from many authors and cultures.  The course also gives some attention to writing for publication and allows the option of submitting creative work.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

ENG 284 African American Drama
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fox, Flanagan

This course will focus on African-American drama since the 1960s.  We will consider how playwrights worked to create a black aesthetic, question and rewrite history, explore intersectional identities, counter stereotypes, and build community.  These plays do not simply exist in opposition to some "mainstream" American tradition; rather, they are deeply, profoundly American, inviting all of us to engage discussions around race, history, privilege, and inequity that are deeply embedded in our artistic and social heritage as a country. At the same time, we will also ask: how to they reflect conversations within the community they represent?

We will read work by playwrights including (but not limited to): August Wilson, Katori Hall, Lynn Nottage, Tarell Alvin McCraney, Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins, Robert O'Hara, Suzan-Lori Parks, Anna Deavere Smith, Adrienne Kennedy, Amiri Baraka, and Lynn Manning.


Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 286 African-American Literature: 1900- (=AFR 286)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

This course will introduce students to twentieth- and twenty-first century African American literature and literary criticism. It will bring together a wide range of readings from across genres and disciplines, attempting to sketch out the major aesthetic and political features of the black literary project. Authors will include Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Samuel R. Delany, Octavia Butler, Teju Cole, Claudia Rankine, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Fred Moten, and Colson Whitehead to name a few.

Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

 

ENG 288 Contemporary American Multicultural Drama
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fox

  • What does it mean to use the stage to give voice to being part of a multicultural community?
  • How does theater help fight stereotypes and oppression?
  • In what ways do plays rewrite history and create pride?
  • What does it mean to stage the multicultural experience in a globalized world?
  • How does theater show us the intersections of different kinds of identity?

This course will answer these questions and more through our study of twentieth- and twenty-first century drama from several rich traditions of multicultural playwriting in America. Communities represented will include African-Americans, Asian Americans, disabled Americans, Latino/a Americans and LGBTQ Americans. We will explore issues raised in their plays including identity, the American Dream, stereotypes, history, and hope. No prior experience reading drama is necessary.

Satisfies the Cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ENG 289 Environmental Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Merrill

Overview of environmental literature from Thoreau to the present day.  Generally focuses on the environmental literature of the United States, but may include other English-language literature.  Designed for both majors and non-majors.


Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 290 World Literatures - South Africa & C. Europe
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan

Designed for majors and prospective majors.  A historical survey of selected texts outside the British and American literary traditions.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Fulfills a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).

ENG 291 Literary Mysteries
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan

Literary Mysteries is an exciting Innovation course that offers opportunities for students to explore the lovely literary language that writers such as P.D. James, Umberto Eco, Elizabeth George and Ruth Rendell employ in novels such as An Unsuitable Job for a WomanThe Island of the Day BeforeMissing Joseph, and Dark Corners, respectively. Forget the blood, gore, shoot-em-up of many ordinary crime stories. Literary Mysteries are intellectually and dramatically intriguing, layered, intricate, and deftly plotted. Students will build evidence boards in digital sites as they follow the clues embedded in these plots to try to solve the mysteries before the end of the text, and in doing so, they will enhance their deductive skills.

 

Satisfies the Innovation course requirement in English.
Counts as a literature elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 294 Harlem Renaissance
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Churchill

Read major texts of the Harlem Renaissance and explore issues of race, gender, sexuality, migration, & diaspora that shaped this formative moment in twentieth century literature. We will read poetry, fiction, essays, and plays by W. E. B. DuBois, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, and others, situating their work in the context of developments in modern art, music, sociology, psychology, and print culture.

Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Area: North America).
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

ENG 295 Women Writers
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fackler, Staff

This course prowls the house of fiction's dangerous and often forbidden spaces employing the visions and voices of transgressive agents, who go places they should not, wrestle monsters literal and figurative, and rescue bodies (of information and imagination) essential to us all. Readings: selected 19th, 20th, and 21st century fiction by women, from A Room of One's Own, to In the Cut, to Swamplandia, and lots of great works in between.   

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.

ENG 297 Caribbean Literature (=AFR 297)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan

The Caribbean is key to any understanding of the New World. Caribbean Literature takes students beyond the islands's popular music, food, and landscapes-ah, those sandy beaches!-to an understanding of the formation of cultures from Europe, Africa, and India that have produced three winners of Nobel prizes-two in Literature and for Economics. In novels, poems and plays we'll examine the ways in which this particular part of the "Empire" wrote back to Europe before creating its own distinctive body of literature. The course is open to all students, and knowledge of literary theory is not a prerequisite. The most relevant theories will be taught to the class.

Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

 

ENG 340 Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor 
Ingram

Special topics in a selection of Medieval and Renaissance texts (to 1660) with attention to critical approaches.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 352 Strangeness in Shakespeare
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Lewis

Dramatists must write in a way familiar to their audiences if they hope to keep their audiences.  But the best dramatists, at the same time, also challenge the preconceptions and assumptions of audiences. They estrange audience members, provoking them to explore and reassess what they thought they already knew.  Shakespeare does just that, often through characters who are themselves strangers-foreigners-in their environment or through removing characters from their familiar surroundings and placing them where, feeling alien, they must confront themselves and their beliefs.  In this course, we'll study how Shakespeare's incorporation of aliens and alien territories corresponds with and informs his efforts to alienate his audience and, in so doing, encourage them to grow.  Titles will include Love's Labor's Lost, The Merchant of Venice, Othello, and The Tempest, as well as others.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.
Counts as a dramatic literature requirement in the Theatre major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.

 

 

ENG 353 Shakespeare and His Contemporaries
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Lewis

Although Shakespeare tends to overshadow all other writers of his age, he was actually but one of many working, accomplished dramatists of the period who influenced and competed with one another.  By exploring a series of pairings between a Shakespeare play and a play by one of his contemporaries (for example, The Merchant of Venice and Marlowe's Jew of Malta), this course surveys not just Shakespearean drama, but, more broadly, early modern drama.  A discussion-based class that explores Shakespeare in his network, the course also attends to original staging conditions of the plays and to some of the most pressing questions about performance.  A guiding principle of the class is that all of the plays, now neatly presented by editors and publishers for study in the classroom, were originally conceived of as living, malleable scripts for actors.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement for the English major.

 

 

ENG 355 Milton
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ingram

This course follows John Milton's carefully shaped career, starting with early poems, such as Lycidas, before considering prose, such as Areopagitica, and the late masterpieces, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes.  Milton's texts ask some of the most important questions of the Western tradition:  what is the relation between an artist and predecessors?  how much should governments constrain individuals' choices?  are there "natural" elements of gender and sexuality?  if God is both all-good and all-powerful (a huge "if"), why is there so much suffering?  As befits these big questions, ENG 355 emphasizes class discussion and individual discovery through formal and informal writing.  In the Miltonic tradition, this course also emphasizes choice:  students may choose to take a comprehensive final examination or participate in an all-day reading of Paradise Lost, a rare opportunity for students to learn about themselves and about one of the most influential poems in literary history, all in one unforgettable day.

Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 361 Eighteenth Century Pop Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor  
Vaz

In this course, we will interrogate the nebulous issue of taste -- political, literary, and moral of otherwise -- through a variety of texts, such as mock epics, trenchant satires, riveting periodicals, feisty novels, caustic engravings, flippant opera, and bawdy comedies, to consider ways in which Restoration and eighteenth century England negotiated the intersection and divide between high and low art.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 362 A: British Romanticism or B: Reimagining Blake
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

 

Check schedule for course offerings.
Both A and B satisfy the Literary Studies, Creative Writing,a nd Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Both A and B fulfill the Historical Approaches requirement for the English major.

362A British Romanticism

Instructor 
Vaz

Topical study of the poetry and prose of the period ranging from the examination of Romantic gender ideology to studies of individual authors

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.


362B Reimagining Blake

Instructor
Vaz

William Blake was a risk-taker and a rule-breaker.  In his creative output, he sought to unshackle the ideological "mind-forg'd manacles" that stunted human thought.  We will study Blake's seminal works and apply some risk-taking and rule-breaking of our own by digitally recreating a few of his illustrated plates.  Just as Blake used text and image in his original plates, so will we, as we creatively and critically reimagine Blake's work and his message.

ENG 363 History of the Novel
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Fackler

The origins of the novel in Britain and the circumstances, both historical and sociological, surrounding its emergence. 

 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 372 British Fiction: 19th and 20th Centuries
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor  
Churchill, Fackler, Kuzmanovich

Selected British and Commonwealth fiction from 1800 to 2000. 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 373 "Terrible Beauty": Yeats and Modern Poetry
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Churchill


This course in modern poetry explores the ways in which a genre celebrates for communicating truth and beauty also conveys a great deal of terror and ugliness--often in striking, disturbing combinations. In honor of the centennial of the Easter Rising of 1916, which aimed to end British rule in Ireland, the course will begin with an in-depth study of W.B. Yeats, followed by readings of British, Irish, and transnational poets Mina Loy, W. H. Auden, Philip Larkin, Stevie Smith, Seamus Heaney, Linton Kwesi Johnson, and Carol Ann Duffy.

Satisfies the Literary, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 374 Picturing Disability
Prerequisites & Notes

374 Picturing Disability

Instructor
Fox

What does it mean to consider the visual representation of disability as a kind of text? Why does it matter? This course will consider the ways in which picturing disability helps us do several things: expose and challenge stereotype, understand how disabled or ill bodies have been used to create cultural meanings, better understand the social experience of disability, reconsider disability in the medical context, and appreciate the amazing human variation of all bodies that disability underscores.  Representation also presents us with some of the thorny issues with which we will grapple: what are the ethics of picturing disability, and how can we avoid spectacle or voyeurism even as we take advantage of the "visual activism" staring allows? How do we make typically invisible impairments like anxiety or depression visible? How do we show the reality of pain without reinforcing the sense that disability is only a tragic or isolating existence? How do we create visual representations that retort against tropes so familiar that we may not even realize we are using them to shape our personal definitions of disability? How can we create representations that suggest "disability gain"-that disability begets creativity and innovation in the arts and sciences? In this course, we'll look at a wide-ranging assortment of ways disability has been pictured in society. We'll explore everything from public health posters to medical textbook photographs; painting and sculpture to zines and graphic novels; charity campaigns to material objects (including medical or adaptive devices). You will create your own representation of disability, do some disability hacking of material objects, and work together to curate an online exhibition of disability representations.

This course presumes no prior coursework in English and welcomes those from all majors interested in studying the representation of disability as a way to inform their own work in the arts and sciences.

Satisfies the Literary, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement in the English major.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ENG 380 Studies in American Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor  
Kuzmanovich, Nelson

Special topics in American literature with attention to critical approaches. 

Satisfies the Literary, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 381 American Fiction: 19th Century
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor 
Staff 

Historical and theoretical understanding of romanticism, realism, and naturalism, with attention to Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Crane, and others. 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 382 W.E.B. Du Bois at Large (=AFR 303)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

(ENG 382 cross-listed with AFR 303 during spring 2018 semester only.)

This course will introduce students to the major works of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois.  Readings will include (in chronological order): ThePhiladelphia Negro (1899); The Souls of Black Folk (1903); Dark Princess (1928); Black Reconstruction in America (1935); Color and Democracy (1945); and The World and Africa (1947) to name a few.  They will be supplemented with secondary readings by: Booker T. Washington, Michael Rudolph West, Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Hazel Carby, Paul Gilroy, Adolph Reed, Lewis Gordon, Marina Bilbija, C.L.R. James and others.

Fulfills a 300-level major thinkers requirement of the Africana Studies major (Geographic Area: North America).
Counts as a 300-level elective and fulfills the Diversity requirement in the English major.
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Community, and Equality requirement.

ENG 386 American Fiction: 20th Century
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Kuzmanovich, Nelson

A study of realist, modernist, and postmodernist American fiction that is not only set in the past, but actively questions the ability of fiction writers to adequately capture and depict the spirit of another time. Major authors: Wharton, Faulkner, Vonnegut, Doctorow, Ishmael Reed, Morrison, Roth. Readings include fiction, criticism on major texts, and theory that deals with the relationship between historiography and fiction. An upper-division elective intended for majors but open to non-majors.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 387 Contemporary Poetry
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Parker

A course concerned with schools, movements, and problems in the literary arts, "Contemporary Poetry" will include exploration of poetic geneaologies, and investigate the relationship between poetry and cultural theory, poetry and current affairs, and poetry and technology.

Satisfies the history requirement for the English major.
Counts as a literature course for the Global Literary Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 388 Contemporary Theatre
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

388 Contemporary Theatre

Instructor
Fox

Despite our highly visual and multimedia age, we don't often think of the stage as being a site of significant cultural conversation. Yest there is simply no substitute for the vitality and importance of live theater. To paraphrase Edward Albee, theater puts the mirror up infront of an audience and asks them: "This is who you are. Now what are you going to do about it?"

This course will examine the origins and development of contemporary theater in the Western tradition, post-1960, with an emphasis on American and British drama. We will particularly place heavy emphasis on text-based drama of the last two decades, examining the ways in which recent theater has asked its audiences to contemplate issues of concern to contemporary life including (though not limited to) race in America; global violence against women; class division; and the commodification of human relations, both personal and international. We will also discuss how theater challenges us to find creative solutions through connection, community, and claiming identity. No prior experience reading drama is necessary.

In the past, this course has included works by (but is not limited to): August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, Quiara Algería Hudes, Lynn Nottage, Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins, Robert O'Hara, Adrienne Kennedy, Amiri Baraka, Jez Butterworth, Tony Kushner, and Ayad Akhtar.

Satisfies the Literacy, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ENG 391 Literary Criticism
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

 

Instructor 
Kuzmanovich

Analytic and comparative reading of major critical texts.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement in the English major.

ENG 393 Film Theory
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Miller

This course explores theoretical approaches to fiction and nonfiction film, television, video and other media. Though no production experience is required, we will make storyboards and videos, and students have the option to make a video as a final project. We then consider "ists" and "isms" including realism and reality TV; modernism; postmodernism; materialism; evolutionary criticism, and Freudianism and gender theory. Movies we may consider: Modern Times, Pervert's Guide to Cinema, Bicycle Thieves, Star Wars, Shane, Out of the Past, Waking Life, No Country for Old Men, Man with the Movie Camera, Un Chien Andalou, and a variety of shorter videos.

ENG 393 satisfies a Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
ENG 393 fulfills a requirement in the Film & Media Studies interdisciplinary minor.

 

 

ENG 394 Studies in Modern Literature: The Avant-Garde (Fall 2017)
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Churchill

A course concerned with avant-garde schools, movements and strategies, "The Avant-Garde" will include exploration of different genres, media, and cultures, and investigate relationships between avant-garde practice and theory, artistic innovation and social change, and forms, platforms, and politics. Because of its focus on challenging the white, male domination of the avant-garde with attention to women, queer, and minority poets from modernism to the present day, this course meets the diversity requirement for the English major and qualifies for GSS credit.

Fulfills the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Counts towards the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor (Literary and Cultural Representations track).
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
 

 

 

ENG 415 Fall 2017 Seminar Topic- Poetics of Relation: August Wilson
Prerequisites & Notes

ENG 415A (FALL 2017)

Poetics of Relation: August Wilson
Instructor

Flanagan 

Poetics of Relation is the rubric for a seminar in which students analyze the ways in which the discursive forms - novels, plays, essays, and poetry - of one or two major writers relate to specific cultures, landscapes, political and historical moments.  In its three previous iterations students have examined such intersections in the work of two Nobel Laureates Derek Walcott and Wole Soyinka; Vidia Naipaul and Derek Walcott, and in novels and essays by Toni Morrison and Alice Walker.  In fall 2017, the focus will be on August Wilson, one of America's foremost playwrights.  In addition to close readings, substantive discussions, oral presentations, and two major essays, seminar participants will contribute to the Poetics of Relation website on the Davidson college website.

Satisfies the Diversity requirement for the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in Africana Studies and Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

 

ENG 415B (SPRING 2017)

415 B Style
Instructor

Fackler

From Samuel Richardson's titular heroine Pamela obsessing about her wardrobe (1740), to the conspicuous consumption of Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie (1900), and from the discussion of Hero's sartorial choices in Much Ado About Nothing (1598) to the iconic Holly Golightly of Truman Capote's Breakfast at Tiffany's (1958), there is a clear literary history of fashion. This course will consider both fictional and theoretical engagements with fashion alongside the works of authors such as Vladimir Nabokov and Henry James, whose prose reveals the fingerprint specificity of their writing styles. Working from Roland Barthes's theory in The Fashion System to Cecil Beaton's diaries and Joseph Roach's study of the "It" factor ("the easily perceived but hard-to-define quality possessed by abnormally interesting people"), this transcultural and transhistorical course will investigate style as both form and content. Whether we are looking at the fashion and literary styles of the roaring twenties in Fitzgerald's works or the punk subcultures of the UK in the 1980s, we will question how literary innovation and fashion interpenetrate.

Counts as an Innovation course for the English major.
Satisfies the Innovation requirement.

ENG 462 Seminar: A: Romantic Radicalism or B: The Long Eighteenth Century Gothic
Prerequisites & Notes

Check schedule to determine which section is being offered.


462A Romantic Radicalism

Instructor
Vaz

For William Godwin, truth, if it exists, comes about in the "collision of mind with mind."  In this seminar, we will investigate and interrogate how Romantic literature manifests this "collision" by creating and participating in the aesthetic, economic, and socio-political tectonic shifts of the period.  By doing so, we will examine how Romantic literature intersects with the richness and complexity of the period's radical and revolutionary thought.

Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

462B The Long Eighteeth Century Gothic

lnstructor

Vaz

There's nothing like reading books we've been told we ought not read.  That's essentially the story of the Gothic during its inception.  Lambasted by contemporary critics as literature's illegitimate and sinful child, gothic novels nonetheless sold like hotcakes, and the infection easily spread to poetry and drama.  In our seminar, we will trace this phenomenon in England from the 1760's through the Romantic period to study its evolution from bastard child in the eighteenth century to literature worth of scholarship only in the last 30 years of the twentieth century.

Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

 

ENG 472 Seminar A: Gossip or B: Twenty-First-Century British Literature or C: Joyce/Nabokov
Prerequisites & Notes

Juniors and Seniors only. 

Check the schedule to determine which section is being offered.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

472A Gossip

Instructor
Fackler

Drawing on cultural studies and performance studies, this trans-historical and transnational course investigates the role gossip plays in literature, psychoanalysis, journalism, politics, television, film, and new media. The seminar foregrounds the imbrication of gossip and scandal with constructions of gender and sexuality.

This topic counts for the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
 

472B 21st Century British Literature

Instructor
Fackler

This course considers the transformation of the book as artifact and idea since the turn of the century. We will investigate the new, often experimental, narrative forms authors have developed as a response to such twenty-first-century pressures as globalization, terrorism, and genetic engineering. Questions for the seminar include: What are the overarching concerns for fiction in the wake of the postmodern and postcolonial moment? What kind of relationship can we expect between science and literature in the 21st-century novel? Does contemporary science contribute to newly emergent structures of feeling that the novel might register? And if such structures call up concepts of the posthuman, how might they sit with the traditionally humanistic orientation of the novel as a broadly popular genre?  How does post-9/11 fiction respond to current fears of technological and/or natural annihilation? What are the factors determining pre-canonical status for the texts on this syllabus, and how can we understand the new circulation of global capital and cultural value? Students will consider the following concepts: virtual fiction; cloning, the post-human, and dystopian responses to the possibility of a genetically engineered future; alternative modes of narration; the figure of the artist manqué; ghostwriting as a narrative technique (and as a 21st-century replacement for the omniscient narrator); detective fiction; fictions of terrorism and the politics of post-9/11 vulnerability; the new Bildungsroman; the author business, and the influence of book clubs and literary prizes such as the Man Booker. 
 

472C Joyce/Nabokov

Instructor

Kuzmanovich

Why a seminar on Joyce/Nabokov?   Like most seminars, this one requires intensive attention to the themes and techniques of  major writers.  These two long dead writers consists of their still having in print almost all the books they've written,  with those books provoking over 10,000 critical pieces just since 1963.  Joyce's influence is acknowledged by Samuel Beckett, Jorge Luis Borges, Anthony Burgess, Philip K. Dick, Umberto Eco, William Faulkner, Arthur Miller, Raymond Queneau, Philip Roth, Salman Rushdie, Tom Stoppard, and Derek Walcott while Martin Amis,  John Barth, Paul Bowles, Italo Calvino, Bobby Ann Mason, James Merrill, Thomas Pynchon, W.G. Sebald, Zadie Smith, Mark Strand,  Amy Tan, and Richard Wilbur mention Nabokov's, and probably Joyce's by way of Nabokov.

Method:  We will concentrate on (1) their styles (Joyce's "High Modernist" and Nabokov's supposed "post-modernist"/"metafictional"/"intertextual" one) since the grit in these men's words has gotten under the skin of many a reader with an innovative critical approach; (2) their tendencies to generate their respective narrative authority from events in their own lives, especially their respective experiences of exile; (3) their depictions of Love in its various forms (including the loss of it); (4) the absenting presence of the big bogey, Death; and (5) the last member of that robust triumvirate, Art. 

Goals:   A foretaste of mature and thoughtful reading; confidence that you can do independent, original,  and careful scholarship on even the most challenging writing.

But is this class really for you?  If you believe that certain words or subjects should be off-limits to writers or readers, this is not the class for you.  Ulysses and Lolita each continue to sell well over 100,000 copies per year, yet they not only contain but also provoke language and situations which some students may find objectionable.  This is a class for those students who not only possess the already uncommon share of discipline, imagination, memory, and attention to details vouchsafed to most who choose Davidson, but who are also blessed with an ability to heft another's words and deliver and withstand therapeutic non-rancorous badgering especially on the topics of  suspending disbelief in the transfigurative power of art and the (ir)relevance of contemporary critical theory. 

Texts: 0-14-024774-2 Joyce,  Dubliners; 670-0 180301; Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as Young Man; 0-19-511029-3 Fargnoli: James Joyce A-Z 0-394-74312-1; Joyce: Ulysses, Gabler Edition;  0-679-72725-6 Nabokov, Gift; 1-883011-18-3 Novels and Memoirs; 1-883011-19-1 Novels 1955-1962 0-679-72997-6; Nabokov,  Stories  of Vladimir Nabokov; 052153643X; Connolly, The Cambridge Companion to Nabokov (Recommended Only); 0-679-72609-8 Nabokov: Strong Opinions (Recommended Only); 978-0-3-0-7-27189-1Nabokov, The Original of Laura (Recommended Only)

ENG 483 Black Literary Theory (=AFR 383)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

(Cross-listed with AFR 383)

This course will bring together readings both literary and critical/theoretical, beginning with Frantz Fanon's seminal Black Skin, White Masks (1952). Taking Fanon as its point of departure, then, this course will necessarily turn to a discussion of the recent discourse on Afro-pessimism and black optimism, attempting to introduce students to issues and questions of race, race relations, anti-black racism, black sociality, the universality of whiteness, the fungibility of the black body, and of the vulnerability and precarity of black life; and together we will think more closely about how the complex and "unthinkable" histories of slavery, colonialism, and the Middle Passage, for examples, continue to challenge the representational limits and potentialities of traditional literary genres and modes of emplotment. In addition to Fanon, authors will include Orlando Patterson, Toni Morrison, Hortense Spillers, Saidiya Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Jared Sexton, and Fred Moten.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major.
Counts as a senior seminar and fulfills the Diversity requirement for the English major.
Counts as a literature elective for the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

 

ENG 487 Seminar: Legal Fiction
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Nelson

The principal claim of English 487 is that a trial is a text that can be read in much the same way that any other text can be read. Indeed, modern trials are in effect storytelling contests, with two competing "narrators" telling two versions of the same story to a captive audience. Understanding how, when, and to whom this story can be told takes some effort, however, because the language of trials is not the same as literary language and the conventions of legal storytelling are not literary conventions. Nevertheless, a great deal of contemporary literary theory offers genuine insight into the kinds of fictions that get constructed in a courtroom. This seminar tests a number of hypotheses about legal fictions, offers direct observation of some real trials in progress, and asks students to undertake research in the interdisciplinary areas where legal studies and literary studies overlap.
 

FRE 220 Literature and Madness
Prerequisites & Notes

French 201 or above. (Spring)

Instructor
Sainte-Claire

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.
 

FRE 221 Visions of the City
Prerequisites & Notes

French 210 or above. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Staff

Written and visual works that imagine cities and their inhabitants. Discussion topics will include the ways in which urban modernity changes Western conceptions of art, the social geography of space, the treatment of class and race, and immigration. Typical authors include Balzac, Baudelaire, Zola, Maupassant, Apollinaire, Aragon, Pérec, and Beyala.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 223 Childhood and Youth
Prerequisites & Notes

French 201 or above. (Fall)

Instructor
Slawy-Sutton

Literature treating the theme, "l'enfance et l'adolescence,'' through different genres and literary periods. Typical authors: Maupassant, Colette, Prévert, Anouilh, Sarraute, Sebbar, Chedid.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 225 Rich and Poor
Prerequisites & Notes

French 201 or above. (Fall)

Instructor
Kruger

Discussion of the theme of wealth and its place in a variety of literary forms and cultural contexts. Readings typically include plays, poetry, and fiction by French and Francophone authors such as Molière, La Bruyère, Balzac, Maupassant, Baudelaire, Proulx, Roy, and La Ferrière.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

FRE 227 French Writers: Love Hurts
Prerequisites & Notes

French 201 or above.

Instructor
Jacobus

We all love love.  Not surprisingly, French writers are passionate about it.  In this course,  we will read literature where love occurs and is sought.  But for the best French writers, oftentimes love hurts.  In this course, we will follow how this happens, the many different versions of love, and,  across four centuries of great literature,  how writers and fictional characters  navigate through it.

Reading in a foreign language is a challenge for all of us.  One of my promises is to give you the guidance and tools to be an effective and efficient reader in French literature. 

 

No previous experience in reading French literature is required.


Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 228 Introduction to Francophone Literature Abroad
Prerequisites & Notes

Course in literature taught by the Davidson program director in Tours.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 229 Introduction to French and/or Francophone Literature Abroad
Prerequisites & Notes

Courses in literature taught by the Davidson program director in Tours.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 242 Autobiographies, Journals, Diaries (=FRE 321)
Prerequisites & Notes

FRE 201 or FRE 212. Students who have completed FRE 220 or above must enroll in FRE 321.

Instructor
Kruger

Reading and discussion of first-person narratives from a variety of periods. Typical authors: Diderot, Guillerargues, Graffigny, Camus, Gide, Duras.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 287 Studies in Civilization and Culture Abroad
Prerequisites & Notes

Courses on topics related to francophone civilization (e.g., culture, history, politics) taken at a university in a French-speaking country.

FRE 320 Husbands, Wives, and Lovers
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered French 220 or above, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Kruger

Study of representations of female adultery in the 19th century French novel with emphasis on the social stereotypes and cultural myths at play in French fiction. Typical authors: Flaubert, Barbey d'Aurevilly, Balzac, Sand, Maupassant, Mérimée.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 321 Autobiographies, Journals, Diaries (=FRE 242)
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered French 220 or above, or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

Instructor
Kruger

Reading and discussion of first-person narratives from a variety of periods. Typical authors: Diderot, Guillerargues, Graffigny, Camus, Gide, Duras.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 340 Symbolist Poets: Drugs, Music, Revolt
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered French 220 or above. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Jacobus

Study of late 19th-century innovators in poetry: Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Mallarmé, and of their use of metaphor, syntax, image, rhythm, tonality, and literary references.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 341 Poetry, Passion, Painting
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered French 220 or above, or permission of the instructor. (Fall)
FRE 341 is dual-listed with FRE 241.

Instructor
Jacobus

Poetry by Charles Baudelaire, Paul Verlaine, Heather Dohollau, Anne Hébert. Close Reading. Resonances with impressionists and other art. Dynamics of image, rhythms, sounds, time, space, emotions, poetic voice.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 343 Cubist and Surrealist Poets
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered 220 or above, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Jacobus

Study of Cubist and Surrealist artists, in particular poetry from the 1900s to 1930s: Appollinaire, Reverdy, Eluard, Aragon, and Breton.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.
 

FRE 363 Québec: Literature, Society, and Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered French 220 or above. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Kruger

Study of questions concerning Québec society. Focus on texts, events, and movements that have shaped this dynamic and diverse French-speaking society. Typical authors include Poulin, Hébert, Proulx, Chen, Micone, Lalonde, and Hémon.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 368 France and Métissage
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered 220 or above.

Instructor
Fache

Course explores the concept of métissage in the contemporary French literary context.

Fulfills a requirement in the French & Francophone Studies major and minor.
Fulfills a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
Fulfills a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

GER 230 German Literary Masterpieces (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English. (Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

This course offers students an overview of some of the major authors and works of German literature that are significant (1) in their own right, (2) for the German literary tradition, and (3) because of their relationship to English and American literature. We will explore a variety of periods (Enlightenment, Romanticism, Poetic Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism) and genres (drama, novella, novel, opera, poetry, and film).

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 231 Special Literary Topics (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include Berlin Stories and Histories, Goethe and Schiller, Faust, Modern German Theater, Narrative Theory, the Novella, Genius in Literature.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 232 Burning Books (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English.

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Henke

Would the six million Jews have lived had the estimated 100 million books not been destroyed? What is it about books that suggests such a link to the human condition? Using the 1933 book burnings as its point of departure, this course explores the nature of literature in the context of the Third Reich. As you learn about Nazi Germany and the imaginary, and literary resistance to it, you will also be introduced to some basic methods of literary criticism. The end of the course is devoted to literary representations of the Holocaust.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 250 Introduction to German Literary Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

German 201 or placement. (Spring)

Instructor
Ellis
An introduction to authors, genres, and periods in German literature as well as methods of literary criticism. Close reading, discussion, and analytical writing in German about key original texts from various periods and traditions.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 251 Special Literary Topics
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Staff

Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include the Bildungsroman, crime fiction, Theory of Drama, Literature as Resistance, Rainer Maria Rilke, Bertolt Brecht.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

GER 331 Special Literary Topics (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include Berlin Stories and Histories, Goethe and Schiller, Faust, Modern German Theater, Narrative Theory, the Novella, Genius in Literature.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 332 Modernism (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Denham

An interdisciplinary study in English of modernist movements in Central Europe between 1890 and 1940. Topics covered include literary movements (Naturalism, Expressionism, New Realism); artistic movements (Blue Rider, the Bridge, Jugendstil, Neue Sachlichkeit, Bauhaus); music (Neo-Romanticism, Second Viennese School, Jazz); culture and politics (Freud, fascism, urbanism, film, anti-Semitism). Some key figures include: Kandinsky, Klee, Gropius, Rilke, Kafka, Luxemburg, Modersohn-Becker, Th. Mann, Musil, Döblin, Nietzsche, Lasker-Schüler, Hitler, Riefenstahl, Trakl, R. Strauss, Torberg, Jünger.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

GER 350 Modernes Drama
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructors
Henke

Overview of modern German drama in the context of major developments in German, Swiss, and Austrian theater. Playwrights discussed include: Büchner, Brecht, Fleißer, Dürrenmatt, Frisch, Weiß, Bernhard, Tabori, Meinhof, and Jelinek. Taught in German.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

 

GER 351 Special Literary Topics
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor. (German 351: "Modernes Theater" offered in the spring.)

Instructor
Staff
Selected topics in German, Austrian, or Swiss literature. Sample topics include the Bildungsroman, crime fiction, Theory of Drama, Literature as Resistance, Rainer Maria Rilke, Bertolt Brecht.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

GER 354 Contemporary German Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
McCarthy

Overview of German literature since 1989, with particular emphasis on prose fiction and popular literature. Authors discussed include: Günter Grass, Judith Hermann, Florian Illies, Daniel Kehlmann, and Juli Zeh, among others. Taught in German.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

 

GER 380 Studies in German Language, Literature, Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructors
Staff

Courses numbered 380-389 are taken with Duke/Davidson in Berlin.

GER 430 Seminars (in trans.)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

Courses numbered 430-449 are seminars taught in translation. Specific topics are announced in advance of registration.

GER 450 Seminars
Prerequisites & Notes

German 250 or permission of the instructor. (German 455: "Poetik des Mordes" offered in the fall.)(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Henke

Courses numbered 450-479 are seminars taught in German. Specific topics are announced in advance of registration.

GRE 214 Greek Tragedy: Sophocles' Oedipus the King
Prerequisites & Notes

Greek 201
Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 314.
(Fall 2017)

Instructor
Cheshire

A close reading in Greek of Sophocles' Oedipus the King in light of its context and current scholarship.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 266 Greek Philosophers: Plato's Gorgias
Prerequisites & Notes

Greek 201
Students who have already taken a GRE course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as GRE 366.
(Spring 2018.)

Instructor
Toumazou

Introduction to the Platonic dialogue, with special attention devoted to the relationship between philosophy, rhetoric, poetry, and desire.

GRE 314 Greek Tragedy: Sophocles' Oedipus the King
Prerequisites & Notes

Greek 201
(Fall)

Instructor
Cheshire

A close reading in Greek of Sophocles' Oedipus the King in light of its context and current scholarship.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GRE 366 Greek Philosophers: Plato's Gorgias
Prerequisites & Notes

Greek 201
(Spring 2018)

Instructor
Toumazou

Introduction to the Platonic dialogue, with special attention devoted to the relationship between philosophy, rhetoric, poetry, and desire.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GSS 201 Feminist and Queer Theories
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Tilburg, Boyer, Horowitz

This class explores the epistemological and theoretical foundations of Gender and Sexuality Studies. Students will become familiarized with the different theoretical traditions that inform contemporary gender analysis, and examine scholarly definitions of gender and sexuality. We discuss the means by which gender and sexuality are produced and reproduced at the individual and institutional levels, their intersection with other dimensions of social difference, as well as various related approaches to and interpretations of equality, justice, and freedom.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HIS 469 Work, Gender, and Political Imagination in Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wiemers

Investigates how gender and labor have been used to construct and contest the political imaginaries of individuals, communities, and states in 19th and 20th c Africa.

Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies the Cultural Diversity distribution requirement.

LAS 300 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: Afro-Cuban Feminisms (=AFR 300)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

Black and mulata women have participated in constructing Cubanidad (Cuban nationalism) since the beginning of the Cuban republic in 1902. However, the largely male-dominated national narrative that has made Che Guevara's "New Man" famous since 1959 frequently overshadows their interventions. Despite this public silence, Afro-Cubanas (Afro-Cuban women) have consistently challenged narratives of exclusion and contributed to antiracist and antisexist movements in Cuba. As theater critic, Inés María Martiatu Terry explained in 2011 one of the goals of the Afrocubanas movement is to "feminize negritude and to blacken feminism."  

This course will analyze Afro-Cubana feminisms through a close reading of the work of four key black and mulata intellectuals and activists-Sara Gómez, Nancy Morejón, Daisy Rubiera, and Gloria Rolando. In doing so, it seeks to trace the legacy of the many black and mulata women who participated in revolutionary Cuba from the 1960s to the present. In particular, the course will examine how Afro-Cubanas have challenged negative stereotypes about black women, worked both inside and outside of Cuba's state-sponsored women's movement, and fought to create space for racial and sexual rights. All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.

The course can be repeated for credit given sufficiently distinct topics.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies the Histories and Genealogies major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

LAT 211 Roman Epic: Vergil's Aeneid
Prerequisites & Notes

Latin 201
Students who have already taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 311.
(Spring 2018)

Instructor
Neumann

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 222 Roman Lyric and Elegy: Catullus
Prerequisites & Notes

Latin 201
Students who have already taken a LAT course beyond 201 should enroll in this course as LAT 322.
(Fall 2017)

Instructor
Cheshire

Close reading of selections from Latin lyric and elegiac poetry.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 311 Roman Epic: Vergil's Aeneid
Prerequisites & Notes

Latin 201
(Spring 2018)

Instructor
Neumann


Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LAT 322 Roman Lyric and Elegy: Catullus
Prerequisites & Notes

Latin 201
(Fall 2017)

Instructor
Cheshire

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

LIT 372 Nabokov & Global Literature (=RUS 373)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor Utkin

Vladimir Nabokov--brilliant writer, outrageous literary gamesman, and cosmopolitan exile--is a towering figure of twentieth-century literature. His most famous novel, Lolita, propelled him to international stardom and changed the transnational literary landscape. Child of a turbulent century, Nabokov wrote exquisite and at times disturbing prose in Russian and English, balancing between imaginary worlds and harsh realities. This seminar offers a sustained exploration of Nabokov's major Russian and American writings as well as film adaptations of his Despair (Rainer Werner Fassbinder) and Lolita (Stanley Kubrick). In the second half of the seminar we turn to novels Nabokov haunts: Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran, J.M. Coetzee's Disgrace, Orhan Pamuk's The Museum of Innocence, and W.G. Sebald's The Emigrants. We will consider memory, exile, trauma, nostalgia, and identity as we read Nabokov, who saw existence as a "series of footnotes to a vast, obscure, unfinished masterpiece." All readings and discussion in English.

 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.  

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement.

LIT 432 Theory and Practice of Literary Translation (Seminar)
Prerequisites & Notes

Intermediate competence (one course beyond 201) in at least one language besides English and prior satisfaction of the Literature distribution requirement.

Instructors
Cheshire, Denham, Ellis, Ewington, Fache, Kietrys

This seminar addresses theoretical and practical aspects of literary translation, underscoring translation as both a distinctive form of creative writing and a demonstration of cross-cultural and linguistic competencies. Coursework includes regular literary translation, theoretical and historical readings, peer review, and a substantial final project and writing portfolio. The course explores translation across languages and cultures, but also issues of genre, adaptation, register, period, colonial and post-colonial literary and cultural relations, canonicity and innovation, for example.

Satisfies a requirement of the English major.

PHI 216 Philosophy of Language
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Jankovic

Discussion of theories of communication, linguistic meaning, and truth. Other topics vary, and have included metaphor, naming and describing, reference, vagueness, and universals. 

Counts as an elective for the Philosophy major and minor.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
 

POL 353 The Latin American Political Novel
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
R. Crandall

This course analyzes the political messages and discussions within some of Latin America's most widely read works of fiction.  The course also examines the broader political, economic, and social context in which these stories take place.  The novels will be read in English translation.


Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies. 
Satisfies a requirement of the International Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.

REL 176 Literature of the Muslim World
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Zamir

A thematic and genre-based study of seminal literary texts from around the Muslim world that takes a literary approach to the study of religion.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies Middle Eastern Studies requirement.
Satisfies South Asian Studies requirement.

REL 222 Tragedy and Comedy in Biblical Narrative
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Plank

A study of the tragic and comic dimensions of biblical literature. Special attention will be given to the Saul and David narrative and to the books of Ruth, Jonah, and Esther.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 224 The Psalms and the Self
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Plank

A study of selected biblical psalms and their exploration of the fabric of human selfhood. Particular attention will be given to the psalms' poetic construction of what it means to be a self and how they, in turn, offer transformative means for the self's expression. Study will involve a close analysis of psalms as literary texts and intertexts as well as analysis of their function in given liturgical contexts.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 232 Parables in the Jewish and Christian Traditions
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Plank

Selected parables in the Jewish and Christian traditions, including parables of Jesus, the Rabbis, the Hasidim, Kierkegaard, and Kafka. Emphasis on the religious significance of narrative.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 244 Modern Jewish Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Plank

Modern Jewish fiction, poetry, and literary theory with particular focus on modern Midrash and the significance of writing as a religious act. Selected texts from Yiddish, Euro American, and Israeli literature include writings of I.L. Peretz, Sholem Aleichem, S. An-ski, I.B. Singer, Cynthia Ozick, David Grossman, and Amos Oz.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Diversity requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement of the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

REL 301 Perspectives in the Study of Religion
Prerequisites & Notes

Pre/Corequisites:  Any two Religion courses or permission of the instructor.

Students intending to go abroad in their junior year should take this course in their sophomore year, if possible. 

Instructor
Poland

Required of all majors. Critical examination of various methods, disciplines, and theories employed in the academic study of religion, focusing particularly on those approaches that locate religion in its social, cultural, and political contexts. Generally taught in spring semester. Required of all Religion majors by the end of the junior year.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 320 The Genesis Narrative
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome.

Instructor
Plank

A literary study of the book of Genesis, appropriating midrashic, intertextual, and post-modern strategies of interpretation.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 321 The Exodus Tradition
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels welcome.

 

Instructor
Plank

A literary study of the book of Exodus and its appropriations in biblical literature, midrash, Jewish and Christian ritual, and Holocaust iconography. Use of literary, midrashic, intertextual and post-modern strategies of interpretation.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 347 Christian Latin Writers
Prerequisites & Notes

LAT 201 or equivalent

(not offered 2015-16.)

Instructor

Foley

 

Readings and research on selected Christian Latin authors from 200-600, including Tertullian, Cyprian, Ambrose, Jerome, Augustine, and Gregory the Great.

 

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 449 The Spiritual Imagination in Contemporary Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor

Plank

A study of how selected American writers have imagined transcendence and the life of the spirit, as well as a consideration of the relationship of poetic and religious language. Authors to be studied include: Christian Wiman, Fanny Howe, Franz Wright, Mary Szybist, Anne Carson and others.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives Distribution Requirement.

Counts for the LIT minor. 

RUS 260 Duels, Death, & Desire: The 19th-Century Russian Novel (in English)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Ewington

This course explores the great 19th-century Russian literary tradition, including works by Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy. We will consider the "ritualized violence" of dueling, rapidly shifting attitudes toward sexuality and love, questions of social justice around serfdom, Russia's complicated relationship with the West, religion vs. scientific progress, and the Russian writer's role as prophet of truth in a land of autocracy. No knowledge of Russian required or expected.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

RUS 266 Vampires
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

In this class we will examine the figure of the vampire, as well as the use of vampirism as a metaphor in folklore, literature, journalistic texts, theater and film. Some vampires, as we will come to learn, do not even drink blood. Many don't fear the sun. So what do these varied monsters have in common? Their "otherness" and their focalization of cultural desires and anxieties. By studying vampirism through a historical perspective, we will learn that vampires - although they may not have reflections - reflect our anxieties about alterity, particularly in regard to such charged subjects as gender, sexuality, race, religion and nationality.

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
 

RUS 270 Nobel Laureates: The Politics of Literature - The 20th-Century Russian Novel (in English)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Utkin

In this course we will examine key cultural and socio-historical moments in the development of twentieth-century Russian literature by focusing on the prose and poetry of authors awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature - Ivan Bunin, Boris Pasternak, Mikhail Sholokhov, Alexander Solzhenitsyn, and Joseph Brodsky. Additionally, we will read Lev Tolstoy, who vehemently rejected being nominated for the prize, as well as Vladimir Nabokov and Anna Akhmatova, who arguably merited the award but never received it. 

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

 

RUS 290 Russian Theater (in English)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

This course introduces the rich heritage of Russian theater from the nineteenth century to the present day. We begin with Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, and Chekhov and continue with early twentieth-century theatrical experiments, Soviet plays, and post-Perestroika works. No knowledge of Russian required or expected.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

RUS 293 The Soviet Century (Topics in Russian Culture)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Utkin

One hundred years after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, which changed the course of the twentieth century, we will explore the cultural history of the Soviet Union, the world's first socialist country. While the dates 1922-1991 circumscribe the lifespan of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the ramifications of the Soviet experience shape not only contemporary Russia but fourteen other countries: the former Soviet Republics of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. In this course, we will look at the art and ideology that held these fifteen nations together. Moving beyond the clichéd view of the USSR as the Evil Empire, we will focus on the most pivotal moments in the emergence of the "country of workers and peasants" and trace its evolution from pariah nation in the 1920s into nuclear superpower following WWII. We will consider the theoretical writings of Karl Marx, Vladimir Lenin, and Leon Trotsky, avant-garde experimentation in the arts, and the doctrine of Socialist realism in an effort to understand the contradictions of Soviet life leading up to and during the Cold War. A particular attention will be paid to underground cultures that arose in response to the repression of free speech, to ethnic discrimination, and to the Gulag penal system.

All readings and discussion in English. No knowledge of Russian or Eastern European history is expected.


Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

 

RUS 294 Russia & Ukraine - War & Peace (Topics in Russian Literature in English)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Ewington

In 2008 Putin quipped to the U.S. president, "you must understand, George, Ukraine is not even a country." That denial of sovereignty later took an ominous turn, with the annexation of Crimea and the ongoing violence in Eastern Ukraine. Most Westerners are perplexed by all this. Aren't they one Slavic people? In fact, their common cultural and political heritage notwithstanding, many Ukrainians bristle at the linguistic, political, and cultural dominance of their Russian "brothers and sisters," while many Russians view Ukrainians as part of their own "nation." But what is meant by "nation?" Looking beyond political structures, status as a great nation was traditionally affirmed by the production of a national literary epic. In this course we will develop a nuanced appreciation for the current conflict through careful attention to each nation's canonical war epic: Taras Bulba by Nikolai Gogol, a Ukrainian who wrote in Russian and is claimed by both nations as their own - and Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace - perhaps the most famous novel of all time, which is set in the years leading up to and during the Napoleonic invasion of Russia in 1812 and the patriotic fervor that ensued. Along the way, we will discuss a few shorter "Ukrainian tales" by Gogol, as well as Tolstoy's early military tales, "The Sevastopol Sketches," which were inspired by his experiences in the Crimean War

 

All readings and discussion in English.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

 

RUS 297 Russian Women Writers (in English)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Ewington

This course offers an introduction to Russian women writers from the age of Enlightenment to the present day. Texts include memoirs, novels, poems, and plays, as well as readings on Russian Gender Studies. No knowledge of Russian required or expected.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

RUS 320 Masterpieces of Russian Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

RUS 202 or equivalent. (Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

Advanced reading and discussion of canonical works by Russian writers, such as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Turgenev, Mayakovsky, Bulgakov, Pasternak, Akhmatova, and Tolstaya. This course is conducted in Russian.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

RUS 370 Twentieth-Century Russian Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

RUS 202 or equivalent. (Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff
 

This class is conducted entirely in Russian. It combines the study of Russian literature with the development of vocabulary and grammar skills for advanced speaking and writing. We will read, discuss, and analyze short works by masters of 20th century Russian literature in the original. In the course of our readings, we will also learn about major events in 20th-century Russian history that form the important context for these works.

RUS 373 Nabokov & Global Literature (= LIT 372)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Utkin

Vladimir Nabokov--brilliant writer, outrageous literary gamesman, and cosmopolitan exile--is a towering figure of twentieth-century literature. His most famous novel, Lolita, propelled him to international stardom and changed the transnational literary landscape. Child of a turbulent century, Nabokov wrote exquisite and at times disturbing prose in Russian and English, balancing between imaginary worlds and harsh realities. This seminar offers a sustained exploration of Nabokov's major Russian and American writings as well as film adaptations of his Despair (Rainer Werner Fassbinder) and Lolita (Stanley Kubrick). In the second half of the seminar we turn to novels Nabokov haunts: Azar Nafisi's Reading Lolita in Tehran, J.M. Coetzee's Disgrace, Orhan Pamuk's The Museum of Innocence, and W.G. Sebald's The Emigrants. We will consider memory, exile, trauma, nostalgia, and identity as we read Nabokov, who saw existence as a "series of footnotes to a vast, obscure, unfinished masterpiece." All readings and discussion in English.

Satisfies a major requirement in CIS Russian Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in CIS Russian Language and Literature

Satisfies a major requirement in CIS Global Literary Theory

Satisfies a minor requirement in Russian Studies

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing & Rhetoric distribution requirement

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

RUS 401 Seminar in Special Topics
Prerequisites & Notes

RUS 202 or equivalent. (Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

Study of a specific author, genre, theme, or aspect of culture. Readings, compositions, oral reports, and discussions in Russian.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

RUS 410 Dostoevsky (Special Topics in English)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Ewington

This course offers an in-depth engagement with a range of Fyodor Dostoevsky's works, including his first novella Poor Folk, The Double, major novels such as Crime and Punishment and Brothers Karamazov, his pseudo-autobiographical prison memoir Notes from the Dead House, as well as a selection of his shorter experiments from Diary of a Writer.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

RUS 420 Tolstoy (in English)
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Ewington

This course offers an opportunity to study in depth the great Russian novelist and thinker, Leo Tolstoy. We will read a variety of texts from his early stories, to his great novels (War and Peace and Anna Karenina), to his later philosophical tracts and "tales for the people." Throughout the semester, students will also have opportunities to engage Tolstoy through the lens of selected essays of critical theory.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
 

SOC 372 Feminist Theories
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Introduces students to key concepts and debates within feminist social theory.  Explores the significance of gender within social life, how gender is produced at the individual and institutional levels , as well as feminist conceptualizations of 'the good society.' Addresses key questions of social theory including the relationship between individuals and social structures, the construction of identities, and the meaning of power.

Satisfies the Gender and Sexuality Studies Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.

SOC 373 Contemporary Social Theory
Prerequisites & Notes

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors only.

 

Instructor
Ewoodzie

This course is designed to provide broad overview of contemporary social theory and introduces you to the concepts, writings, and arguments of some of the most important social theorists of the 20th century. We will discuss complex interrelated cultural, social, political and economic issues and discover how social theorists have dealt with them during the decades in the 20th century when their theories were advanced. Most important, we will endeavor to understand how these issues affect our understanding of the world and the everyday lived experience. The terms and concepts we will get familiarized with are concepts such as social mechanisms, social action, social structure, as well as modernity, post-structuralism, critical theory, rational choice theory, postmodernism, and cultural studies.  

Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

 

SPA 241 Latin American Literature in Translation
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2016-17.)

Instructor
Staff

Selected works of Latin American literature in English translation. Readings and class discussions are in English.

Students entering before 2012 and after: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

SPA 244 U.S. Latino Literature in English
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered in 2015-2016.)

Instructor
González

Reading and discussion of a variety of texts to develop a general idea of the complex experience of people of Latin American background living in the United States. Readings and instruction in English. 

Students entering before 2012 and after: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

SPA 270 Textual Analysis
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 or its equivalent. (Fall and Spring)

Instructors
Gonzalez, Maiz-Peña


Reading and discussion of works by Spanish, Latino, and Latin American writers. Introduction to cultural, historical, and textual analysis of Hispanic literatures and cultures. Research papers in the target language. Conducted in Spanish.

Required of all majors and minors.
Counts towards the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

SPA 320 Spanish Literature Through the Golden Age
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Fall 2016)

Instructors
Sánchez-Sánchez

Major works from medieval times through the seventeenth century, studied against a background of historical developments and literary currents. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area I for the major in Hispanic Studies and counts towards the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

SPA 321 Theater of Spain's Golden Age
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents.

Instructors
Willis

Development of 16th and 17th century Spanish theater, including works by Lope de Vega, Cervantes, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcón, and Calderón de la Barca. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area I for the major in Hispanic Studies and counts towards the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

SPA 322 Cervantes
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents.
(Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Willis

Advanced study of Don Quixote and the literary criticism it has generated. Other works by Cervantes may be included. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area I for the major in Hispanic Studies and counts towards the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

SPA 323 Spanish Picaresque Novel
Prerequisites & Notes

SPA 260 and 270 or equivalents.

Instructor
Willis

This course principally examines Spain's Golden Age Picaresque Novels in conjunction with specific socio-historico-cultural contexts.  We begin by defining genre and the picaresque, as well as by exploring the times in which these great works of social criticism were written by studying the circumstances of early modern Spain. Later, we read texts less often referred to as "picaresque" to explore the continuity of the picaresque in Hispanic Letters and in world literature. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies Area I for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.

SPA 330 Cultural Production and Crisis in Contemporary Spain
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents.

Instructor
Lopéz  Martín

The global financial crisis of 2008, from which Spain still struggles to recover, has also revealed itself as a deep crisis in the realms of social relations and cultural production. Popular initiatives such as the Occupy movement on a global scale or the 15-M in Madrid's central Sol Square have unveiled the need of new models of coexistence and expression, from both an ethical and an aesthetic point of view. In this course, we will study a selection of visual and verbal texts from a wide array of cultural domains and literary genres (including cinema, music or graphic novel), which reflect and at the same time contribute to this change in cultural sensibility. With the support of critical texts, we will explore key concepts such as mass culture, cultural resistance or poetic commitment/consciousness; furthermore, we will pay attention to the role that emotions and affect play within the texts object of study as elements of social struggle and mobilization.

Satisfies Area II for the major in Hispanic Studies and counts towards the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

SPA 331 Twentieth and Twenty-first Century Spain
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructors
Kietrys, Vásquez

Writers of the early decades, the Generation of 1927 and the Spanish Civil War, the Franco and democratic years, into the 1980s, 1990s, and the new century films.  Study and analysis of socio-historical, ideological, and cultural contexts. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area II for the major in Hispanic Studies and counts towards the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

SPA 340 Latin American Literature I
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Fall)

Instructor
Boyer

Literature and the arts against a background of history and socio-political developments from 1492 to 1900, with a focus on major currents of thought and world views. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area IV for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Counts towards Latin American Studies as well as the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

SPA 341 Latin American Literature II (= SPA 401, spring 2018)
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Spring)

Cross-listed with SPA 401 for SPRING 2018 ONLY.

Peña

Ideas, aesthetics, and theoretical interpretations that have shaped modern Latin American literature and other cultural expressions from 1900 to the present. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area V for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

SPA 343 Contemporary Latin American Novel
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Fall 2016.)

Instructors
Peña

Most important literary works of major contemporary writers from Latin America studied against a background of recent history and relevant ideologies and theoretical interpretations. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area V for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Counts towards Latin American Studies as well as the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

SPA 346 Latin American Theatre
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Not offered in 2016-17.)

Instructor
Staff

Study of the most important Latin American playwrights, plays, and performances within the ideologies and aesthetics that have shaped contemporary Latin American theatre. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies the Literature distribution requirement.

SPA 347 Imperial Cities
Prerequisites & Notes

SPA 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Boyer

Focused study of the way urban space becomes the staging ground for the conquest of the New World, and ultimately, the administration and consolidation of global imperial order throughout the viceregal period. Although much of the semester focuses on Mexico City, this course develops a general vocabulary to talk about the ways urban literary and intellectual culture were inextricable from a discourse about empire and the increasingly urban character of imperial modernity. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area IV for the major in Hispanic Studies and counts towards Latin American Studies.

SPA 348 Hispanic Theatre and Performance
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Not offered in 2016-17.)

Instructor
Staff

The course expands the communicative, interpretive, and analytical Spanish language skills of the students by using the most recent studies about contemporary Hispanic theatre theories and practices. Conducted in Spanish.

 

SPA 350 García Lorca and His Generation
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Not offered in 2016-17)

Instructor
Vásquez

Theatre, narrative, and poetry of García Lorca's literary and intellectual generation in its pre-Civil War and exile years. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area II for the major in Hispanic Studies and counts towards the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory.
 

SPA 354 Dying of Love in Medieval Iberia (=SPA 402, spring 2018)
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents.

Cross-listed with SPA 402 for SPRING 2018 ONLY.

Instructor
Sánchez-Sánchez

This course examines literary and iconographic representations of love and death during the Iberian Middle Ages, with special emphasis on the 15th century sentimental novel.  Within the artistic tradition of the cults of love and death that characterize the Iberian Middle Ages, this course reflects upon the ways in which authors and artists created a distinctive tradition depicting the attitudes towards love and death that have ultimately shaped the modern Hispanic collective imaginary of these concepts.  Interdisciplinary theoretical approaches.  Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area I for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
 

SPA 359 Contemporary Latin American /Latino Short Story
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or the equivalents. (Not in 2016-17)

Instructor: Maiz-Pena

This upper level course is designed to engage the student in a complex process of critical thinking and cross cultural interpretation as we explore a relevant body of milenio Latin American/Latino short narratives. Concentrating on analytical, creative, and argumentative reading practices, we will identify relevant textual, ideological, and cultural representational strategies of postmodern short narratives, sudden fiction, micro-fiction, film and animation adaptations. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area V for the major in Hispanic Studies. Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

SPA 375 Latin American Women Writers
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents.

Instructor
Maiz-Peña

An examination of genre, gender, and representation in women's writing in Latin America from the 20th century to the present.  Latin American women's textual and visual narratives: Practices and Theoretical Frameworks. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area V for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Counts towards Gender & Sexualities Studies, the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory, and Latin American Studies.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

SPA 401 Latin American Literature II (=SPA 341, spring 2018)
Prerequisites & Notes

SPA 260 and 270 or their equivalents.

Cross-listed with SPA 401 for SPRING 2018 ONLY.

Instructor
Boyer

Ideas, aesthetics, and theoretical interpretations that have shaped modern Latin American literature and other cultural expressions from 1900 to the present. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area V for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

SPA 402 Dying of Love in Medieval Iberia (=SPA 354, spring 2018)
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents.

Cross-listed with SPA 354 for SPRING 2018 ONLY.

Instructor
Sánchez-Sánchez

This course examines literary and iconographic representations of love and death during the Iberian Middle Ages, with special emphasis on the 15th century sentimental novel.  Within the artistic tradition of the cults of love and death that characterize the Iberian Middle Ages, this course reflects upon the ways in which authors and artists created a distinctive tradition depicting the attitudes towards love and death that have ultimately shaped the modern Hispanic collective imaginary of these concepts.  Interdisciplinary theoretical approaches.  Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area I for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.

SPA 407 Gender and Memory in Television and the Novel
Prerequisites & Notes

Completion of a 300-level course in Spanish, or permission of the instructor. Limited to juniors and seniors. Priority will be given to majors, then minors. (Fall 2016)

Instructor
Kietrys

What can prime-time television teach us about gender? What can a novel teach us about Fascism? What can a film teach us about memory? We'll consider these questions and more as we examine representations of women in Spanish media from the Second Republic through today. We'll also explore gender construction at different moments in recent history, including differences between the "ideal woman" of the early 20th century and the early 21st century. Discussion of the supporting roles of male characters will also inform our analyses. Course conducted in Spanish. Counts for Major & Minor in GSS and Hispanic Studies.

 

SPA 429 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Any two literature or culture courses, or approval of the chair and the instructor.
(Not in 2016-17)

Instructor
Staff

Special topics, themes, genre, or a single figure in literature, history, or culture, outside the content of other courses under the direction and supervision of a faculty member who approves the topic(s), the research project, and determines the means of evaluation. Open to Senior Majors.

THE 242 Women's Work: 21st Century Female Playwrights (=ENG 242)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

This course provides a close look at work created for the stage by women since 2000. The analysis of plays written and produced in the 21st century will be set in the context of feminist and queer theory which has offered insights into the cultural function of "women's work."

Satisfies a requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Theatre major or minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Literary and Cultural Representations track of the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
 

THE 250 Play Analysis for Production
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Gardner, Sutch

Examination of traditional methods of play analysis and their application in the development of production plans with a wide variety of theatrical scripts.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

THE 261 Modern Drama (= ENG 261)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fox

(Cross-listed as English 261.) European, American, and British drama from Ibsen to Pinter with emphasis on the major movements within Western theater: realism, naturalism, expressionism, Epic Theater, and Theater of the Absurd.

Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

THE 285 Politics & Performance: 20th Century Theatre & Drama (=ENG 285)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

The course is a study of plays and theatrical theory from a range of geographic regions.  The course explores ways practitioners experimented with form and content in articulating their reactions to the human condition of the 20th century.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

THE 371 World Theatre History
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor 
Green

Study of the theory and practice of stage performance throughout the world from ancient Greece to the end of the 19th Century. Lectures, readings and discussions, with emphasis on the Western tradition.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.

THE 383 Contemporary Theatre and Performance: Trends in Theatre Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

One previous THE course required or permission of instructor

Offered every other year.

Instructor
Green


This course introduces students to current artists, working methodologies, and scholarship within the field of theatre and performance.  The course focuses on ways broader cultural dialogues about identity-sexuality, race, gender, class, ability-and technological innovation influence what appears on-stage, and the ways that audiences and critics think and write about these performances.  Course includes field trips to see live performances.