Faculty

With 14 full-time faculty, the History Department is among the largest at Davidson. We all hold doctorates and are actively engaged in research and scholarship. The department emphasizes excellence in undergraduate teaching, and several of us have received awards for outstanding teaching, including five who have received the Hunter-Hamilton Love of Teaching Award. We have also been recognized by our professional peers for scholarly distinction, receiving national and international awards for both publications and professional service.

Daniel Aldridge

Daniel Aldridge
Ph.D. Emory University

I teach courses in American and African-American history, primarily focusing on the period from the Civil War to the present. I am particularly interested in issues such as civil rights activism, popular culture, and U. S. foreign relations.

Robin Barnes

Robin Barnes
Ph.D. University of Virginia

I teach courses in late medieval and early modern Europe, Renaissance/Reformation, the history of western Christianity, and popular culture in pre-industrial Europe. My research focuses on the cultural history of Germany in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Jonathan Berkey

Jonathan Berkey
Ph.D. Princeton University

I teach the full range of Middle Eastern history since the rise of Islam, and I participate in Davidson's Humanities Program. My research and writing focus on Islamic religious culture and medieval Egypt and Syria.

Vivien Dietz

Vivien Dietz
Ph.D. Princeton University

I teach British history, from Boadicea to Margaret Thatcher, and I also participate in Davidson's Humanities Program. My research interests focus on the politics and culture of late eighteenth-century Britain.

Andrew Fiss


Andrew Fiss
Ph.D. Indiana University

I teach courses in science studies for the history department and the writing program.

Michael Guasco

Michael Guasco
Ph.D. College of William and Mary

I specialize in early American history, the American Revolution, the colonial Atlantic world, and the history of slavery. My research addresses the foundation and development of racial slavery in Anglo-America.

Peter Krentz

Peter Krentz
Ph.D. Yale University

I teach Greek and Roman history.

Jane Mangan

Jane Mangan
Ph.D. Duke University

I teach upper-level courses on colonialism, gender, religion, and revolution and a survey course on colonial and modern Latin American history.

Ndubueze Leonard Mbah

Ndubueze Leonard Mbah
Ph.D. Michigan State University

I specialize in 19th and 20th century social change and identity formation in southeastern Nigeria. My research interests include women and gender, masculinities, slavery and colonialism. I teach survey courses in African history and upper level classes on gender and sexuality in Africa, comparative slavery, and Christian and Muslim communities in Africa.

Sally McMillen

Sally McMillen
Ph.D. Duke University

I teach 19th-century U.S. history, with an emphasis on the American South, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and American women's history. 

Saeyoung Park

Saeyoung Park
Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University

My research focus is the history of China and Korea, and I teach the history of East Asia. My research interests include war and memory, national identity, tobacco, and the aesthetics of consumption.

Thomas Pegelow Kaplan

Thomas Pegelow Kaplan
Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

I teach upper level classes in German history, transnational history, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, and offer survey courses on modern European and Russian histories. My research focuses on histories of violence, language, and culture of Nazi Germany and Nazi-occupied Europe and the 1960s global youth revolts.

Anelise Shrout

Anelise Shrout
Ph.D. New York University

My research and teaching interests lie in antebellum American and Atlantic history, popular political culture, and transnational philanthropy. I teach the first half of the American history survey, as well as courses on popular politics in the antebellum United States and North American environmental history. I'm also interested in historical mapping, digital humanities, and the the role of narrative in historical writing.

Patricia Tilburg

Patricia Tilburg
Ph.D. University of California at Los Angeles

My research and teaching explore questions around gender, culture, and history in modern Europe and especially France from the late eighteenth century through the mid-twentieth century.

John Wertheimer

John Wertheimer
Ph.D. Princeton University

My teaching specialties include modern U.S. history and legal history and my research interests range from civil liberties in the United States to family law in Latin America.