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William Fried

Education

D.M.A. University of California, San Diego
M.M. New England Conservatory
B.S. Brown University

Background

My specialty as a pianist is "new music," that is to say, composition from the last fifty years (or so), and particularly the music of certain avant garde traditions of this period. My other interests include French music more generally, electro-acoustic music, and the realization of unconventionally notated scores.

Some recent concert highlights include performances at the L.A. Philharmonic Green Umbrella Series, Vancouver New Music Festival, Roerich Museum (N.Y.), UC San Diego Wed@7 Series, La Giralda de l'Arboç, Charlotte New Music Festival, and New England Conservatory's Summer Institute for Contemporary Performance Practice. Critics have described my playing as "poised and remarkably dexterous... hypnotic" (The Boston Globe), "in possession of an incredible technique" (Vancouver Classical Music), "subtly shaded" (SanDiego.com), and "awe inspiring" (Beacon Sound). 

In addition to performing as soloist, I am also part of an electro-acoustic duo with percussionist Scott Deal. Our performance of John Luther Adams' Four Thousand Holes at last year's Vancouver New Music Festival was described as "utterly engrossing" by I Care If You Listen online arts magazine. 

One of my more recent interests is music notation, particularly as it relates to the realization of complex and/or unconventionally notated music. Much of this interest is practically inspired: developing tricks and techniques to simplify learning processes (for example, knowing how and when to make use of metric modulations). But some is also theoretical: what are the associated psychological and suggestive implications of moving between "synonymous" notations? It is a subject on which I've presented at conferences and the topic of a recent article I published in Perspectives of New Music. 

My undergraduate degree was in mathematics; during my subsequent graduate studies in music, my teachers were Aleck Karis and Stephen Drury.

Teaching

MUS 050, 055, Applied Music (Non-Credit)
MUS 155, 255, 256, 355, Applied Music (Credit)