Grant Recipients

Awards Received:

Recently awarded: July 1, 2012 to present
July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012
July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011
July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010
January 1, 2009 to June 30, 2009
July 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008
January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2008
July 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007
January 1, 2007 to June 30, 2007
July 1, 2006 to December 31, 2006
January 1, 2006 to June 30, 2006
July 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005
January 1, 2005 to June 30, 2005

(Awards listed as received by Research Grants & Contracts Office)

Please join the Grants and Contracts Office in extending congratulations to the following grant and fellowship recipients:

Recently Awarded: July 1, 2012 to Present

July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012

BILL RINGLE, ANTHROPOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  National Geographic Society
Program:  Waitt Grants Program
Title:  Pioneers of the Puuc Hills, The Proyecto Yaxhom

MICHAEL DORCAS, BIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  Williams-Transco
Program:  Environmental Impact Study
Title:  Status of Bog Turtles at Friday Bog and Surrounding Area:  Examination of Potential Impacts of Williams-Transco Activities

MICHAEL DORCAS, BIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Program:  Center for Youth, Family & Community Partnerships--HERPS
Title:  Carolina Herp Atlas

A. MALCOLM CAMPBELL, BIOLOGY
LAURIE HEYER, MATHEMATICS
Awarding Agency:  National Science Foundation
Program:  Collaborative Workshops
Title:  Workshop: Synthetic Biology Workshops for Interdisciplinary Teams of Undergraduate Faculty

A. MALCOLM CAMPBELL, BIOLOGY
LAURIE HEYER, MATHEMATICS
Awarding Agency: National Science Foundation
Program:  Research at Undergraduate Institutions (RUI)
Title:  RUI: MPS-BIO: Collaborative Research: Design and Construction of Second-Generation Bacterial Computers

KAREN HALES
, BIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  National Science Foundation
Program:  Research at Undergraduate Institutions (RUI)
Title:  RUI:  Roles for tissue-specific ATP synthase subunits and other proteins in mitochondrial shaping during Drosophila spermatogenesis

SOPHIA SARAFOVA, BIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
Program:  AAI Undergraduate Faculty Travel Grant
Title:  2012 AAI Undergraduate Faculty Travel Grant to attend the 99th AAI Annual Meeting -- Immunology 2012 - May 4-8, Boston, MA

SOPHIA SARAFOVA, BIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  North Carolina Biotechnology Center
Program:  Undergraduate Biotechnology Research Fellowships
Title:  Gregory Swan - Duke-Davidson Immunology Program

STACEY RIEMER, CENTER FOR CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
VERNA CASE, TEACHING, LEARNING AND RESEARCH
Awarding Agency:  Associated Colleges of the South
Program:  Faculty Advancement
Title:  Emerging Issues Academy

MICHAEL TOUMAZOU, CLASSICS
DEREK COUNTS, UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE
Awarding Agency:  National Science Foundation
Program:  Research Experiences for Undergraduates Sites (REU Sites)
Title:  REU Site:  The Athienou Archaeological Project, Cyprus

DAVID MARTIN, ECONOMICS
Awarding Agency:  Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES)
Program:  Fulbright-Nebru Research Fellowship
Title:  Value of Gambhir River Water

SHERRY MALUSHIZKY, FRIENDS OF THE ARTS
Awarding Agency:  North Carolina Arts Council
Program:  Arts and Audiences
Title:  Connecting Crossroads in North Carolina

SHERRY MALUSHIZKY
, FRIENDS OF THE ARTS
Awarding Agency: South Arts
Program:  Regional Touring
Title:  Connecting Crossroads in North Carolina

THOMAS PEGELOW KAPLAN, HISTORY
Awarding Agency: German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD)
Program: Study Group Grant
Title:  The Holocause: Interpretation, Memory, and Representation (Seminar for Advanced History Majors)

TIMOTHY CHARTIER, MATHEMATICS
Awarding Agency:  Associated Colleges of the South (ACS)
Program:  Blended Teaching and Learning Grant
Title:  Exploring Applications of Linear Algebra

TIMOTHY CHARTIER, MATHEMATICS
Awarding Agency: College of Charleston
Program:  NSF CAREER subaward (PI: Amy Langville, Ph.D., College of Charleston)
Title:  College of Charleston, NSF Subaward

MARY MUCHANE, OFFICE OF GRANTS & CONTRACTS
KATIE  ANN SKOGSBERG, CENTRE COLLEGE
Awarding Agency:  Associated Colleges of the South
Program: Faculty Advancement Grant
Title:  The Responsible Conduct of Research at Undergraduate Institutions

DAN BOYE, PHYSICS
Awarding Agency:  Sandia National Laboratories
Program:  Supplier Collaboration
Title: Characterization of Lumninescent Behavior

TIMOTHY GFROERER, PHYSICS
Awarding Agency:  University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Program:  Charlotte Research Institute and Department of Electrical and Computing Engineering
Title:  Duke Energy Special Initiatives:  Distinguished Visiting Faculty

ANDREW O'GEEN, POLITICAL SCIENCE
PAT SELLERS, POLITICAL SCIENCE
Awarding Agency: Associated Colleges of the South (ASC)
Program:  Faculty Advancement Grant
Title:  Blended Learning in Statistics

KRISTI MULTHAUP, PSYCHOLOGY
MARK FAUST, UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHARLOTTE
Awarding Agency:  National Institutes of Health
Program:  Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA)
Title:  Cognitive Training Effects in Adults Using Brain-Plasticity-Based Computer Games

MARK SMITH, PSYCHOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  National Institutes of Health
Program: National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) R01
Title:  Social Influences on Drug-Seeking Behavior

GREGORY SNYDER, RELIGION
Awarding Agency: National Endowment for the Humanities
Program:  Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars
Title:  Christian Groups in Second-Century Rome

GAYLE KAUFMAN, SOCIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES)
Program:  Fulbright Scholar Program -- Partnered Scholar Award
Title:  British Fathers' and Employers' Experiences with Additional Paternity Leave

JESSICA TAFT, SOCIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  American Sociological Association (ASA)
Program: Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline (FAD)
Title:  Social Movements and the Meaning of Childhood:  Intergenerational Collaboration in the Peruvian Working Children's Movement Wage Workers

BEN ROE, WDAV
KIM CLINE, WDAV
Awarding Agency:  National Endowment for the Arts
Program:  NEA Arts on Radio and Television FY 2011
Title:  "Concierto": America's First Spanish Language Classical Music Service

BEN ROE, WDAV
KIM CLINE, WDAV
Funding Agency:  National Endowment for the Arts
Program:  NEA Arts on Radio and Television FY 2011
Title:  Classical Public Radio Listen Live Initiative:  From the Carolinas to the Nation


July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011

MICHAEL DORCAS, BIOLOGY
Awarding Agency: Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC
Program:  SNSWP Amphibian Survey
Title:  Survey for Amphibian Populations at the McGuire Nuclear Station SNSWP (Standby Nuclear Service Water Pond)

MICHAEL DORCAS, BIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  Duke Energy Foundation
Program:  Duke Power Environmental Studies
Title:  Herpetological Education and Research

SOPHIA SARAFOVA, BIOLOGY
Student:  Thomas Silvers
Awarding Agency:  North Carolina Biotechnology Center
Program:  Undergraduate Biotechnology Research Fellowship
Title:  Thomas Silvers Duke-Davidson Immunology Partnership

DAVID BROWN, CHEMISTRY
Student:  Demetrios Pagonis
Awarding Agency:  National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Program:  Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program (SURF) 
Title:  FY 2011 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF)-NIST Gaithersburg

TIMOTHY CHARTIER, MATHEMATICS
Awarding Agency:  College of Charleston
Program:  NSF CAREER--REU Supplement (PI: Amy Langville, Ph.D., College of Charleston)
Title:  Mathematical Device Dissection Lab 2011

MICHAEL MOSSINGHOFF, MATHEMATICS
Awarding Agency:  Simons Foundation
Program:  Collaboration Grants for Mathematicians
Title:  Collaborations in Number Theory and Analysis

KRISTIE FOLEY
, MEDICAL HUMANITIES
Awarding Agency:  Wake Forest University
Program:  NIH R21 subaward (PI: Erin Sutfin, Ph.D., Wake Forest University)
Title:  Implementing Evidence-Based Tobacco Cessation STrategies in Campus Health Clinics

GERARDO MARTI, SOCIOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  Association for the Sociology of Religion
Program: Research Support
Title:  Research Funds for Continued Research in the Sociology of Religion

BILL RINGLE
, ANTHROPOLOGY
Awarding Agency:  National Endowment for the Humanities
Program:  Summer Stipend
Title:  To Be Toltic

BILL RINGLE, ANTHROPOLOGY, received a National Geographic Society Committee for Research and Exploration Grant that enabled him and his team to conduct archaeological surveys and preliminary test excavations of the Yaxhum Valley, Yucatan, a region of ancient Maya urban centers that has the potential to provide spatial, temporal, and ecological bridges between the early monumental architecture of the northern plains and the less massive structures in the eastern Puuc Hills.

BARBARA LOM, BIOLOGY, was recently awarded an Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) Mellon Faculty Renewal Grant to host a retreat for the staff of ACS's Summer Teaching and Learning Workshop. For the past 20 years the Workshop has provided a unique opportunity for faculty from all disciplines, ranks, and campuses to come together in a supportive and interdisciplinary environment to focus on the craft of teaching. The retreat allowed the staff to assess the Workshop's progress, set goals and priorities for the future, and begin implementation of needed changes so the curriculum better reflects contemporary college classes.

HILTON KELLY
, EDUCATION, was awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Visiting Scholars fellowship to spend a year at the James Weldon Johnson Institute for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies at Emory University. In addition to engaging in meaningful intellectual exchange with colleagues involved in the modern civil rights movement and social advocacy, Kelly will work on his research project on the life of Marion Thompson Wright (1902-1962).

BARBARA LOM and JENNIFER ROUND, BIOLOGY, have received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI) award that will enable them to expand basic knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern neural circuit formation in developing embryos.  As part of the project, undergraduate students will be actively trained in the scientific research process.

JULIO RAMIREZ, PSYCHOLOGY, was named by President Barack Obama in January 2011 as a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM).  The awards annually recognize the teachers and institutions that have provided broad opportunities for participation by women, minorities, and people with disabilities in science, mathematics and engineering in elementary, secondary, undergraduate and graduate education.  Rramirez has been involving such students in his research on recovery from brain injury for the past thirty years and has spearheaded national efforts to promote neuroscience education and research.

JULIO RAMIREZ
, PSYCHOLOGY, is the recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) Research in Undergraduate Institutions (RUI) award in support of his long-term research on the Functional Significance of Hippocampal Sprouting, which explores the brain's capacity to anatomically reorganize itself after injury.  The three-year grant also provides support for the education and training of undergraduate students in neuroscience.

PATRICIA TILBURG, HISTORY, along with Christine Haynes of UNC-Charlotte, has been awarded a grant from the Charlotte Area Education Consortium to continue the Charlotte Area French Studies workshop, launched in 2010 for scholars of French culture.  At each meeting, participants discuss a pre-circulated paper.  although the workshop sessions are oriented toward professors of French literature and history, students and members of the public are welcome to attend.

TIM CHARTIER, MATHEMATICS, has received funding from the Arts and Science Council for new Mime-matics masks for use in the Math Department/HHMI outreach program MOSAIC 2011. MOSAIC (standing for math, originality, science, achievement, imagination and creativity) is devoted to math and science activities for elementary school students and their families. In Mime-matics, Chartier explores mathematical ideas through the art of mime. The new masks will help make connections to tangrams, which many children play in elementary school, and encourage geometric thinking by utilizing geometric shapes to capture facial expression.

THOMAS PEGELOW KAPLAN, HISTORY, has received a postdoctoral fellowship from the German Historical Institute in Washington, D.C. He will be a scholar in residence at the Institute during the summer of 2011 to work on his current research project "Naming in the '60s and '70s: Political Activism and Representations of Genocide in West Germany and the United States."

ERLAND STEVENS, CHEMISTRY, and DAVE WESSNER, BIOLOGY, have been awarded a 3-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for their study of triazole nucleobases in antiviral nucleoside analogues. Wessner's specialty in the biology of viral infections complements Stevens' research in medicinal and bioorganic chemistry. The project, which will involve undergraduate researchers, seeks to develop a new method for making anti-viral drugs and testing new drugs for biological activity. Viral diseases, including AIDS, herpes, and certain types of hepatitis, are often treated with drugs that can imitate nucleic acids.


July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010


DAN BOYE, PHYSICS, has received a Major Research Instrumentation grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the purchase of a Newport/Spectra-Physics versaScan OPO (Optical Parametric Oscillator), one of only a few such laser systems in the United States. Boye's research in materials science continues a fruitful collaboration between Davidson, Hamilton, and Whitman Colleges that has involved over 40 undergraduate student research projects in the last 4 years. The equipment will allow them to study materials they have not been able to in the past, because of the ease of generation of the appropriate wavelength.

TIM CHARTIER, MATHEMATICS, is working on another Device Dissection Lab, for use in classrooms nationwide, under Amy Langville's College of Charleston NSF CAREER grant. The goals of the project are the creation of a series of web pages to interactively teach the mathematical ideas behind Google's PageRank algorithm through a game that will be called Google-opoly, and the production of a related video, The Random Surfer.

WOLFGANG CHRISTIAN
, PHYSICS, is the recipient of a grant from NSF's National STEM Education Distributed Learning (NSDL) Pathways Small Grant Program for a project titled Cross-Linked Models (XLM). The primary purpose of the XLM project is to add context and value to learning resources with links between the comPADRE OSP Collection and traditional journals, education and outreach programs of the American Physical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, in order to more effectively engage students, teachers, and the general public in physics, computational physics, and computer modeling.

JOE DENNIS, HISTORY, has received a "Profession Culture" grant from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France to spend three months this summer working on Chinese local histories from Uighur and Tibetan areas of northwestern China. The books were published between 1535 and 1908 and collected by the famous scholar-explorer Paul Pelliot (1878-1945). Dennis will use the materials in a study of publishing in Chinese minority regions.

JOE DENNIS, HISTORY, has been awarded an NEH Summer Stipend to write and publish abstracts of individual works by the famous scholar-explorer Paul Pelliot (1878-1945), and to use Pelliot's local histories in a study of book publishing, circulation, and reading in western China.

MICHAEL DORCAS
, BIOLOGY, has received a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to study, with the involvement of undergraduate researchers, populations and movement of semi-aquatic turtles on golf courses in urbanized areas. The primary product of the research will be a handbook designed for golf course superintendents that will focus on habitat designs and maintenance procedures that can augment turtle populations on golf courses, but will be developed in such a way that management of habitat will benefit other species groups as well.

MICHAEL DORCAS, BIOLOGY, has a grant to determine the cumulative effects of flow regulation, land cover, and fish on amphibian and reptile occupancy, relative abundances and species richness in wetland habitats of the Broad River Basin in South Carolina. The Broad River Mitigation Trust Fund was established to protect and enhance the fish community of the Broad River basin, and results from Dorcas' research will be used to draw conclusions about riverine and riparian management that will benefit other animal populations, particularly fish, of the Broad River Basin.

MICHAEL DORCAS, BIOLOGY, has received a contract from the Duke Power Company to perform herpetological surveys for hellbenders (giant salamanders) in Lake Jocassee. Hellbenders generally inhabit large, fast-flowing, rocky streams and their populations can be affected by dams. Lake Jocassee is a man-made lake formed by the Whitewater, Thompson, and Toxaway Rivers, and is located in the South Carolina mountains.

MICHAEL DORCAS, BIOLOGY, has received support from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission for the ongoing Carolina Herp Atlas project which provides detailed locality data on the reptiles and amphibians of North Carolina using observations from scientists, conservation specialists, wildlife managers, educators, and citizens. The Carolina Herp Atlas employs an online system for data entry which allows the contributor to effectively manage and submit their amphibian and reptile observations, including submitting a voucher photograph.

NANCY FAIRLEY, ANTHROPOLOGY, has an Associated Colleges of the South (ACS)/Mellon Faculty Renewal Grant to introduce ACS faculty to the literature on African cultural retentions during a two-day teaching seminar, "Atlantic Africa: The Missing Link in Southern Culture." ACS faculty will be able to integrate the knowledge acquired at the seminar into existing courses on the American South. Part of the project will involve creating an African Diaspora website that will make available resource materials for ACS faculty members.

BRENDA FLANAGAN, ENGLISH, has received a literary nonfiction award from the North Carolina Arts Council to write a book on singer Nina Simone. Flanagan will explore the ways in which the political events in America between 1967 and 1969 impacted the career of Nina Simone and will, among other things, interview people in the singer's birthplace of Tryon, NC.

KRISTIE FOLEY
, MEDICAL HUMANITIES, has received funding from the National Institutes of Health's Institute on Drug Abuse for a research study through several free clinics in North Carolina. The data collected by Foley, with the assistance of undergraduate student researchers, is ultimately intended to help implement smoking cessation programs among the uninsured, who generally have limited access to smoking cessation programs, which may contribute to their excess disease burden and poorer survival.

FUJI LOZADA, ANTHROPOLOGY, has been awarded a prestigious Andrew W. Mellon Foundation New Directions Fellowship to augment his current research and teaching career in cultural anthropology and East Asian studies with interdisciplinary training around his chosen topic, "Ghana with Chinese Characteristics: Chinese Economic Development in Coastal West Africa," to acquire regional expertise in both Africa and Environmental Studies.

HUN LYE, RELIGION, has received an ASIANetwork Freeman Foundation Student-Faculty Fellows Program for Collaborative Research in Asia grant. Lye will travel with three undergraduate students to conduct research in the area of religion and ethnicity among the Chinese community in the Muslim-majority state of Malaysia.

DOUG OTTATI, RELIGION, has a sabbatical grant from the Louisville Institute to complete a long-standing project: a two-volume, more or less comprehensive and systematic interpretation of Christian faith titled, "A Systematic Theology for Liberal Protestants." Ottati's approach in the volume is theocentric, pragmatic, and revisionary, and the theology he is developing also supports commitments to justice and reconciliation that shape a robust and faithful participation of Christians and their communities in civil societies.

SOPHIA SARAFOVA, BIOLOGY and JEFF MYERS, CHEMISTRY, are the recipients of an Education Enhancement Grant from the North Carolina Biotechnology Center for the purchase a flow cytometer which will be used in the newly introduced biochemistry concentration. The new equipment will also enhance existing programs, such as the creation of a truly hands-on laboratory section for the Immunology class, and the inclusion of the latest techniques in the laboratory components of the Genetics class and the Group Investigation and Independent Research classes that cover topics from Cell and Molecular Biology, to Immunology, to Synthetic Biology.

MARK SMITH, PSYCHOLOGY, is the recipient of a Recovery Act-funded competitive supplement to his NIH Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) to continue his research on social and environmental influences on cocaine sensitivity, and, in particular, to examine, using an animal model, whether simply socializing can help people overcome addiction.

MARK SMITH, PSYCHOLOGY, has received a major research grant (R01) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) titled "Physical Activity and Substance Abuse" to investigate the effects of exercise on a range of behavioral processes that are believed to be involved in the development of substance use disorders. Several independent research and senior thesis students will also contribute to the project.

MARK SMITH, PSYCHOLOGY, has a subcontract with Emory University to work on an NIH-sponsored project studying the interactions between exercise and drug effects, specifically the effects of voluntary exercise on reinstatement of cocaine seeking.

MARK STANBACK
, BIOLOGY, has a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation to continue his successful undergraduate student-driven research on the competition between Eastern Bluebirds (EABL), a species experiencing unprecedented population growth, and Brown-headed Nuthatches (BHNU), a species declining throughout its Southeastern range. Stanback's current project will examine whether pairing EABL and BNHU boxes on golf courses will reduce competition and increase breeding by Brown-headed Nuthatches.

MARK STANBACK
, BIOLOGY, has received a grant from the North Neck Audubon Society of Virginia to investigate competitive interactions between the Brown-headed Nuthatch and the Carolina Chickadee in an area undergoing suburbanization near the northern extent of the range of the Brown-headed Nuthatch. In addition to the scientific findings and the implementation of management techniques on golf courses to enhance the numbers of resident Brown-headed Nuthatches, the project will also provide opportunity for citizen involvement.


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January 1, 2009 to June 30, 2009

MICHAEL DORCAS recently received another supplement to his National Science Foundation CAREER grant which will allow an undergraduate student to participate in the culmination of a multi-year collaborative study examining the effects of urbanization on amphibians and reptiles.

MARK STANBACK's students ESTHER CLINE and MICKEY BELCHER recently received Birds of the Carolinas Research and Programming grants from the Carolina Bird Club in support of their research on Carolina chickadees and eastern bluebirds.

THOMAS PEGELOW KAPLAN is the recipient of a Humboldt Research Fellowship in support of his book-length study that explores how student, women movement, civil rights, and Jewish community activists in West Germany and the U.S. interacted in shaping the meanings of the terms "genocide" and "Holocaust," modes of remembering, and political activism.

TIM CHARTIER has received another subcontract from the College of Charleston to continue the fruitful collaboration with Amy Langville on her NSF CAREER grant. Chartier, along with students, will design and implement a Device Dissection Lab intended for application in the classroom. The module will discuss sports ranking, specifically focusing on how the methods of the lab can be applied to March Madness, as well as other uses.

JULIO RAMIREZ has received support from the recently awarded institutional HHMI grant to continue the successful national mentoring program SOMAS (Support of Mentors and their Students) that has to date supported 48 faculty and students conducting summer research at their home institutions. Beginning in 2008, the program was renamed SOMAS-URM (Support of Mentors and their Students from Underrepresented Minority groups) and restructured to strengthen the engagement of underrepresented individuals in neuroscience by creating a program tailored to their needs.

JULIO RAMIREZ has a Department of Energy Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) supplement to his NSF-SOMAS grant which will support Dr. Onarae Rice of Furman University and his two undergraduate students for a summer of research at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

SAMUEL SÁNCHEZ-SÁNCHEZ has been selected to attend one of several summer study opportunities supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Sánchez-Sánchez will participate in a five-week seminar titled "Celestina and the Threshold of Modernity" held at The University of Virginia in Charlottesville and directed by E. Michael Gerli, Commonwealth Professor of Hispanic Studies.

JEFFREY MYERS has received a Single Investigator Cottrell College Science Award from the Research Corporation for his work on myelin protein zero (PO).  The project will test the hypothesis that disease-linked mutations lead to mutant PO proteins.  The ultimate goal of the research is to provide the foundation for pharmaceutical intervention against peripheral neuropathy, a class of crippling diseases adversely affecting the peripheral nervous system.  Several students will work with Myers on this project.

BARBARA LOM AND KRISTI MULTHAUP have been awarded a grant by the Associated Colleges of the South (ACS)/Mellon Faculty Renewal Program to support a project titled, "Preparing for EPICS:  Educational Practices Informed by Cognitive Science." The grant will enable Lom and Multhaup to attend "Connecting the Mind, Brain, and Education," a week-long institute at Harvard's Graduate School of Education that places a strong emphasis on interdisciplinary dialogue and focuses on bridging the gap between research and practice in education. Lom and Multhaup will use their experiences at this institute to add two new dimensions to Davidson's grass-roots Teaching Discussion Group (TDG). First, begin conversations to examine contemporary research on teaching and learning and secondly, host a workshop by an expert in the cognitive science of education that will be available to faculty at ACS institutions.

ROBIN BARNES is the recipient of an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) fellowship. He will use the fellowship to complete his book "Astrology and Reformation," slated to be published by Oxford University Press. Barnes' book project addresses basic but largely neglected connections between the flowering of Renaissance astrology - both the learned art and the popular obsession-and the culture of the German Reformation. Combining extensive primary evidence with insights from numerous specialized studies, "Astrology and Reformation" presents a major new synthesis, arguing for the integral role of astrological symbolism in preparing the ground for the religious movement sparked by Martin Luther, as well as in shaping the distinctive characteristics of German evangelical culture in its first century (c. 1520-1620). The work thus shows how apparently contradictory currents were combined in a distinctive early-modern confessional world view

VIVIAN SHEN has been awarded a Faculty Renewal Grant from the Associated Colleges of the South/Mellon Foundation to develop a new interdisciplinary class about Shanghai modernity that will blend a study of Shanghai history, Shanghai society, Shanghai literature and Shanghai cinema, as well as other forms of Shanghai popular culture.  As part of the course development, Shen will spend six weeks at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences.

 

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July 1, 2008 to December 31, 2008


MICHAEL DORCAS has been contracted by the Greenville Water System to perform surveys and evaluate the habitats of bog turtles.

JESSICA COOLEY and ANN FOX are organizing the first exhibition to address the intersection between female identity and disability identity in Re/Formations:  Disability, Women, and Sculpture.  On view from January 15-February 26, 2009, five female artists, four of whom are disabled, will exhibit sculpture that examines disability not as mental or physical insufficiency limited to a small minority, but as a diffuse cultural identity, like race or sexual orientation.  The exhibition has received funding from the Arts and Science Council, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, the Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

MICHAEL DORCAS has been contracted by Duke Energy to perform herpetological surveys of terrestrial habitats, streams, lakes, ponds and wetland areas in the vicinity of power plants to document amphibian and reptile species including any rare, threatened, or endangered species.  Dorcas will be assisted by undergraduate students in his survey work.

CAROLINE FACHE
has been selected to participate in the French American Cultural Exchange's (FACE) French Film Festival grant program, the Tournees Festival.  The grant will enable Fache to host a week-long festival of important French language films at the college from March 29 to April 5, 2009.

JASON KOO was recently awarded a Literature Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts to facilitate his poetry writing in the coming year.  He will continue to teach, while the grant will enable him to travel, promote the publication of his new book, "Man on Extremely Small Island," attend conferences and otherwise work on writing.  NEA awarded 42 fellowships this year out of an applicant pool of over 1,000.  Fellows will be featured on the NEA Writers' Corner website along with their work, author's statement, biographical sketch, and photo.

MICHAEL DORCAS has received continued funding from the Duke Energy Foundation for his herpetology research and education/outreach initiatives in the region.  Dorcas' research evaluates the impacts of urbanization on amphibian and reptile populations and provides unique opportunities for development of effective, undergraduate-based research, outreach, and conservation initiatives.

MICHAEL DORCAS, in collaboration with scientists at the University of Florida, is working on a project on the thermal biology of Burmese pythons in the Everglades.  The research is part of a long-range project to provide science support to evaluate impacts of pythons on native biological diversity and development of control measures for Burmesse pythons.

PETER AHRENSDORF is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) fellowship to undertake a book-length study of the political thought of Homer titled "Homer's Education of the Greeks:  The Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Origins of Classical Civilization."  The book project will focus on Homer's teaching concerning several central themes of political philosophy.  While Homer has always been regarded as a poet of the first rank, it is forgotten today that such political philosophers as Thucydides, Plato, and Machiavelli considered him to be a foundational political and moral thinker as well.  The goal of Ahrensdorf's study is to restore Homer to his rightful place among the principal figures in the history of political thought.

BRAD THOMAS and the Van Every/Smith Galleries have received a grant from the Arts and Science Council to support a community-based collaboration between visiting artist Chris Johanson and homeless members of Art Works 945 at Urban Ministries Center in Charlotte.  Thomas, along with the artist, and Lawrence and Rob Cann, Directors of Art Work 945, are organizing a series of workshops in which the homeless members of their organization will produce unique ceramic casts from the artist's original sculpture which will be incorporated into Johanson's installation at Davidson.  This collaborative effort will forge a creative bond between the underserved populations of the Charlotte Metro area and the service-based initiatives of Davidson College.

KRISTIE LONG FOLEY has a grant from the National Institutes of Health entitled "Increasing Capacity for Tobacco Research in Hungary."  Foley will collaborate with scientists in Hungary and at Wake Forest University to create institutional capacity in tobacco research; to conduct mentored research that has the potential to significantly reduce tobacco use at the local and national level; and to build individual capacity among Hungarian and U.S. research partners through formal in-country training and mentored research projects.

KRISTIE LONG FOLEY has a grant from the American Cancer Society entitled "Colon Cancer Treatment, Surveillance, and Survival among the Poor."  This project combines data from multiple sources to evaluate whether individuals insured by Medicaid receive adequate treatment and surveillance after diagnosis with colon cancer.  She is also investigating whether treatment and surveillance influence survival.


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January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2008


MICHAEL DORCAS
is the recipient of an Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/Faculty Renewal Program grant. The grant will provide unique opportunities for undergraduate students to become involved in original research examining the impacts of invasive Burmese pythons in Everglades National Park (ENP).  Outcomes are expected to be student-directed projects and eventual publications examining aspects of the ecology of pythons in Everglades National Park and how that knowledge can contribute to mitigating their ecological impacts.

KRISTI MULTHAUP, SCOTT DENHAM, BARBARA LOM and HILTON KELLY have received an Associated Colleges of the South (ACS) Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/Faculty Renewal Program grant to facilitate the development of multidisciplinary efforts in both research and teaching to understand the ways in which memories can be created, altered, preserved, and/or lost. The team hopes that their experiences fostering a Multi-disciplinary Memory Group will spark similar multi-disciplinary courses and scholarly discussions throughout the college, as well as become a model for other colleges and universities.

MERCEDES ROBINSON, a rising senior, and JULIO RAMIREZ have recently been awarded a "Research Supplement to Promote Diversity in Health Related Research" from the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  The award will provide support for Ms. Robinson during her senior year at Davidson College as well as for an additional post-baccalaureate year after graduation.  Ms. Robinson, a psychology major with a concentration in neuroscience, will work on independent research which will serve as the basis for her senior thesis, while being thoroughly trained in histological techniques for the analysis of brain tissue.  During her post-baccalaureate year, Ms. Robinson will focus her attention on conducting research to enhance her preparation and competitiveness for entering medical school.  Her ultimate goal is to conduct mental health research with a focus on health disparities in diagnosis and treatment among minority populations. 

MICHAEL DORCAS recently received another supplement to his National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER grant which will allow two more students to participate in the culmination of a five-year collaborative study examining the effects of urbanization on amphibians and reptiles.

MICHAEL MOSSINGHOFF has received a two-year grant from the National Security Agency (NSA) to continue his research on analytic problems on integer polynomials. Mossinghoff's award-winning research centers on number theory, including analytic, computational, combinatorial, and transcendental aspects. His particular interest is in extremal problems concerning integer polynomials, especially problems dealing with Mahler's measure of a polynomial, and problems regarding factors of polynomials with restricted coefficients.

JANE MANGAN has received a Charles A. Ryskamp Research Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS). Mangan is working on a new book project entitled "Transatlantic Obligations: Legal and Cultural Constructions of Family in the Conquest-Era Iberian World."  Using sources from Peru and southern Spain, like dowries, inheritance suits, and Crown ordinances, Mangan will study transatlantic family ties between the 1530s and 1600, splitting her time between archival research and writing.

TIM CHARTIER
has been awarded a three-year Department of Energy research grant to continue his successful collaborative work, "Numerical Methods for Forward and Inverse Problems in Discontinuous Media," with colleagues at the University of Washington, University of Colorado and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The grant includes support for students who will work with Chartier both during the academic year and over the summers.

TIM CHARTIER is the recipient of an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellowship. Sloan Research Fellowships provide support and recognition to early-career scientists and scholars who show the most outstanding promise of making fundamental contributions to new knowledge. This support will enable Chartier to equip his lab with computing resources for continued numerical research by him, his colleagues and his students thus establishing an academic research center for computational investigation. In addition to basic advances in computational mathematics and numerical linear algebra, the results of this research will ultimately have direct use and impact to researchers for a wide variety of applications, including, astrophysics, neuroscience, contaminant transport in porous media, bi-domain heart modeling, modeling of tumor growth, and flow in heterogeneous porous media. 

KEYNE CHESHIRE has been awarded a grant by Harvard University's Loeb Classical Library Foundation for his book project Reading the Rites: City and Ritual in the Hymns of Callimachus, an introduction to the corpus of six hymns. The hymns' wide variety of ritual and narrative settings reflects the remarkable diversity of an Egypt, and specifically Alexandria, composed primarily of first- and second-generation immigrants from across the Hellenistic world. The book will explore the interplay of hymn, ritual, politics, and society thus illuminating important aspects of the Hellenistic world from the unique perspective of Alexandria.

COLE BARTON has received an Instructional Innovation Fund award from the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE) to develop a computer-driven clinical research laboratory.  A multidisciplinary team of faculty, students and Information Technology (IT) professionals will collaborate in studying problems in Clinical Psychology with very sophisticated and engaging technology that will provide student learning experiences typically available only at large research universities.

GERARDO MARTI  has been accepted into and received funding for a Calvin College Summer Seminar titled, "Congregations and Religious Diversity in Contemporary America," directed by R. Stephen Warner.  This four-week seminar will provide an opportunity for multidisciplinary dialogue on racial and ethnic diversity in the United States and time to work on a book project on the relationship between congregational music and racial diversity.

ALAN MICHAEL PARKER has received a 2008 Established Artist grant from the Arts & Science Council of Mecklenburg County for his book project, Shopping for Democracy:  On Art-Viewing in the 21st Century.  The grant will underwrite research trips to Las Vegas and Paris, for essays on the Bellagio Gallery of Art and the Pompidou Center, respectively, as well as the purchase of a new computer.



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July 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007


MICHAEL DORCAS
 is the recipient of a grant from the South Carolina Department of natural Resources to administer and maintain an on-line database of amphibians and reptiles in South Carolina to which citizens of South Carolina and other interested parties may input collection data using the internet.  This is an expansion of the Carolina Herp Atlas project developed by Dorcas for North Carolina.

GERARDO MARTI is the recipient of an External Faculty Fellowship for Fall 2008 through the Humanities Research Center at Rice University.  Funded by the Lynette S. Autrey Endowment and the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Humanities Research Center hosts visiting professors who participate in the interdisciplinary life of the center.  He will teach a course on race and religious faith in the departments of Religious Studies and sociology and participate in a Humanities Colloquium Series while completing a book project on worship in racially integrated churches.

LAURIE HEYER and MALCOLM CAMPBELL have received a collaborative grant from the National Science Foundation to train undergraduate students to work at the interface of biology by engaging them in the exciting new field of synthetic biology.  Students from Davidson College and Missouri Western State University will be recruited in the spring semester of their freshman year, and remain involved with the program through the fall semester of their junior year, when they will present their work alongside undergraduate researchers from around the world at the International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) Jamboree.

BILL RINGLE has been awarded an NSF grant in conjunction with Millsaps College to investigate regionalism and community formation among the ancient Maya of the Bolonchen District of the Puuc Hills, Yucatan, Mexico.  This project will provide individualized undergraduate training in Mesoamerican prehistory and archaeological methods.

JULIO RAMIREZ recently received a three-year NIH AREA award to build on his long-term research on the Functional Significance of Hippocampal Sprouting.  Ramirez' research will explore whether changes in brain cell connectivity may contribute to some of the behavioral alterations that are associated with schizophrenia.

GEORGIA RINGLE has received another grant from the Mecklenburg County Health Department Project ASSIST to support continued efforts for tobacco use prevention on campus as part of the county-wide initiative on reducing tobacco use.


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January 1, 2007 to June 30, 2007

CINDY HAUSER has been awarded a two-year Cottrell Science award from Research Corporation to extend her study of heterogeneous chemistry to include secondary organic aerosols.  The proposed research will look at the ageing processing of secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere and provide an ideal framework in which undergraduates will be challenged to apply the fundamental principles learned through their courses to a multi-faceted interdisciplinary problem.

KAREN HALES
has received a three-year Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Hales uses genetic techniques in Drosophila melanogaster to explore fundamental questions in cell biology and several undergraduate student researchers will work alongside her as she investigates the morphogenesis of mitochondria during sperm cell development.

TIM GFROERER
has received funding from the American Chemical Society (ACS) Petroleum Research Fund (PRF) for his research on defect level position and occupation in metamorphic heterostructures for multi-junction photovoltaic converters. Several undergraduate students will work with Gfroerer in this research which has applicability in the development of higher efficiency solar cells.

PAUL STUDTMANN has been awarded an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) fellowship to complete a book on the foundations of Aristotle's categorial scheme. In the book Studtmann develops and updates an interpretation of the categorial scheme which takes into account all the work done on Aristotle since the Middle Ages.

GAYLE KAUFMAN has received an ESRC-SSRC Collaborative Visiting Fellowship which will fund a visit to Cambridge University, England, where she has been invited to be a Visiting Associate at the Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (CRASSH) for summer 2007. Kaufman will be engaged in comparative research on fathers' experiences with work and family in Britain and the U.S. in collaboration with researchers at the ESRC Gender Equality Network.

MICHAEL DORCAS
and SHANNON PITTMAN have received a grant from the NC Wildlife Resources Commission to study the ecology, conservation and management of bog turtles in the western piedmont of North Carolina (Friday Bog, Dallas, NC). Dorcas and Pittman prepared the proposal jointly and the research will form the basis for Pittman's senior honors thesis.

GERARDO MARTI has received a fellowship from Calvin College, Michigan, as a Communitas Visiting Scholar where he will spend summer 2007 continuing work on a book project. This fellowship builds on previously funded research which uses interviews and participant observation among church leaders and attenders to understand worship and music in successfully multiracial churches.

MICHAEL DORCAS  recently received a fourth supplement to his National Science Foundation CAREER grant. Each year the supplement has allowed two students to participate in a collaborative study examining the effects of urbanization on amphibians and reptiles.

PETER KRENTZ has received a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to write a book on Archaic Greek warfare focusing on the battle of Marathon. Krentz hopes that the book will resonate not only with military historians and military history buffs but also be a tool for students of history on the reconstruction of ancient battles.

MEGHAN GRIFFITH has recently received a fellowship from the National Humanities Center where she will spend a year working on a book project on free will that will culminate in the presentation of a coherent and plausible picture of human free agency.

LINDA MCNALLY has been awarded an Associated Colleges of the South Science Reform grant to redesign her non-science majors' Human Biology course to present students with an engaging environment that provides both scientific and quantitative literacy skills for evaluating scientific information.  Part of the redesign will include the incorporation of an electronic classroom response system ("clickers") and the expansion of interdisciplinary case study use.


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July 1, 2006 to December 31, 2006


MARK STANBACK
has received a grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation's Wildlife Links Program to determine, along with student researchers, whether competition exists between Eastern Bluebirds and Brown-headed Nuthatches on golf courses in North Carolina.  The project results will enable Stanback to provide golf courses with recommendations to increase Nuthatch numbers.

SHIREEN CAMPBELL has received a grant from the Associated Colleges of the South for students in her Writing for the Community class to develop, in collaboration with the Town of Davidson, a guide to the South-East Greenway scheduled to open in March 2007.  Once completed, the guide will be available in print and online and will be used to help publicize the greenway, provide information on its environment, and encourage safe use.

MICHAEL DORCAS has received a contract to conduct amphibian and reptile monitoring of Five-Mile Branch in the Yadkin River Basin before and after a stream restoration project by the North Carolina Ecosystem Enhancement Program.  He will be assisted in the field by several student researchers.

DAVID WESSNER has been named a BiosciEdNet (BEN) Scholar for 2006-2008.  The BEN Scholars Program is a grassroots outreach program that promotes the use of digital libraries and inquiry-based learning in higher education biological sciences lecture and laboratory courses.  Among other things BEN Scholars receive training in leadership and effective use of digital libraries as well as resources to use in their own classrooms and to share with colleagues through presentations, workshops and one-on-one- mentoring.

TIM CHARTIER is the recipient of a grant from the Arts & Science Council for the construction of masks that will be used in his math and mime performance.  "Mime-matics," which explores math through the art of mime.  The masks will be used to communicate the history of mathematics and demonstrate the applicability of the field in addition to introducing mathematical concepts.

GERARDO MARTI received a Jack Shand Grant from the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion to support research on worship and racial diversity.  Building on preliminary studies, the research focuses on observations and interviews among leaders and attenders of multiracial churches to determine how congregational music affects racial composition.

BRAD THOMAS has received a grant from the North Carolina Arts Council to support the Davidson residency and multi-media installation of contemporary Japanese artist Yuri Shibata as part of a collaborative regional exhibition scheduled for fall 2006 titled "Force of Nature."

A. MALCOLM CAMPBELL and LAURIE HEYER have been awarded, collaboratively with Hampton University, a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation to continue the highly successful DNA microarray workshops that have been organized over the past three summers. The grant will enable faculty from a variety of institutions (with priority given to those teaching at minority-serving institutions) to receive training and resources for curriculum reforms that will reflect the genomics revolution in their undergraduate courses and independent research.

JOHN SWALLOW has been awarded a three-year grant from the National Science Foundation under the Research in Undergraduate Institutions program. The award will involve students in research and dissemination at regional meetings on the teaching and application of Galois theory. Additionally, a co-authored text will introduce the subject to a wider audience, enhancing the national curricular infrastructure.


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January 1, 2006 to June 30, 2006


MICHAEL DORCAS is the recipient of a grant from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to support the development of an online "Carolina Herp Atlas" that will use observations provided by the general public, scientists, conservation and wildlife professionals leading to a better understanding of the distribution of amphibians and reptiles in North Carolina.

BRAD THOMAS has received a grant from the Arts and Science Council North to support the Davidson residency and multi-media installation of contemporary Japanese artist Takasumi Abe as part of a collaborative regional exhibition scheduled for fall 2006 titled "Force of Nature."

MICHAEL DORCAS recently received a third supplement to his National Science Foundation CAREER grant which will allow two students to participate in a collaborative study examining the effects of urbanization on amphibians and reptiles during the next academic year.

DAVE MARTIN, CHRIS PARADISE, and PAT PERONI have received funds from the Associated Colleges of the South for the development of two team-taught environmental studies courses, one an introductory course and one senior-level course. The ACS funds will allow for broad involvement by faculty across the disciplines in the planning and discussion phases.

TIM CHARTIER is working with a student assistant on a Mathematical Device Dissection Lab under a subcontract funded as part of a College of Charleston National Science Foundation CAREER grant. The research results will have direct applicability in the classroom.

CINDY HAUSER is the recipient of a grant from the Associated Colleges of the South to develop a laboratory course for non-science majors in Environmental Chemistry. The goal of the course will be to introduce students to the scientific methods used in solving real world problems that impact our natural surroundings.

BRENDA FLANAGAN has won a two-month summer writing residency at Headlands in Sausalito, California from the North Carolina Arts Council.  This award will provide an opportunity for Flanagan to complete a novel.

PAT SELLERS
has been awarded two grants from the Dirksen Congressional Center and the American Political Science Association to support a project exploring how congressional leaders and members promote and win media coverage of issues and arguments. The grants will build on previously funded research and provide for the in-depth supplemental analysis and assessment of press releases, news stories, press secretary interviews and other sources.

MARK FOLEY has received a Fulbright scholar award to teach and to do research in Budapest, Hungary in spring 2007. Foley will teach several courses in economics and develop professional relationships with Hungarian faculty for potential collaboration on research and curriculum development. Upon his return, he expects to incorporate his firsthand knowledge of the daily experiences of families and firms in Hungary into his teaching and research at Davidson.

MARK SMITH is the recipient of a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) to support his research into the critical biological, pharmacological and environmental factors contributing to differences in drug-seeking behavior across subject populations. Several independent research and senior thesis students will contribute to the research project.

MIKE DORCAS has received continued funding from the Duke Energy Foundation for his herpetology research and education/outreach initiatives in the region. Dorcas' research evaluates the impacts of urbanization on amphibian and reptile populations and provides unique opportunities for development of effective, undergraduate-based research, outreach, and conservation initiatives.

DANIEL CLAYTON, a junior chemistry major, has been awarded a Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship to participate in the Chemical Science and Technology research program at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Maryland.

GERARDO MARTI
has been accepted into and received funding for a Calvin College Summer Seminar titled, "The Transformation of Christian Worship:  Recent History of Protestant and Catholic Practices (1960-2000)."  This two-week seminar will provide an opportunity for multidisciplinary dialogue on contemporary worship and time to work on a proposal for a book project on the relationship between congregational music and racial diversity.

GEORGIA RINGLE has received a second grant from the Mecklenburg County Health Department's Project ASSIST to continue the campaign started in the fall aimed at preventing tobacco initiation and promoting tobacco cessation among Davidson College students and employees.


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July 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005 

FUJI LOZADA has received an award from the Howard Foundation to support a research project exploring the impact of sports and globalization on the development and maintenance of civil society in China. The research aims toward a better understanding of how the larger issues of sports as popular culture shape the values and social relations of Chinese communities in today's highly-interconnected and commodified world.

MARK STANBACK and KRISTA HEINER '06 have been awarded an ACS environmental grant (campus-community partnership) for a project Krista is conducting at the Town of Davidson's new park on Shearer's Road, Fisher Farm Park.  The Town of Davidson has also provided funds for the project.  Twenty pairs of nest boxes have been placed at Fisher Farm Park to do a study on competition among cavity nesting birds.  In addition to carrying out the study, Krista will develop educational materials to be provided to visitors at a new informational kiosk being built and provide informational nature walks to visitors to explain the research.

DAN BOYE recently received an Associated Colleges of the South Technology Fellowship to develop curricula material in the human voice-computer interface. Exercises developed will investigate the successes and shortcomings of Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) and Text-To-Speech (TTS) software routines. The exercises will be designed to help non-science majors explore concepts in much the same way that a scientist does.

ERLAND STEVENS is the recipient of an Associated Colleges of the South Technology Fellowship to develop interactive web-based Medicinal Chemistry exercises. The proposed web exercises will enhance student learning by providing a user-friendly, graphical means of demonstrating medicinal and biochemical concepts.

GAYLE KAUFMAN was recently awarded an American Sociological Association (ASA) Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline (FAD) grant to examine the challenges that men face in combining work and family.  The research project will assess complex aspects of work and family life, adaptation, and satisfaction, the results of which may have a potential impact on public policy.

BARBARA LOM recently received an in-kind grant of 50 male pigmented South African claw-toed frogs (Xenopus Laevis) from FantasticFrog for use in her research into how individual neurons wire themselves together into a precisely interconnected and functional nervous system.  The Xenopus laevis tadpoles lend themselves particularly well to the manipulation and observation of the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the only type of neurons that connect the eye to the brain.

GEORGIA RINGLE has received a grant from the Mecklenburg County Health Department's Project ASSIST to sponsor activities aimed at preventing tobacco initiation and promoting tobacco cessation among Davidson College students and employees.  Part of the project will involve building a coalition of advocates from the campus and community.

TIM CHARTIER has received additional funds from the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research to continue work on numerical methods for forward and inverse problems in discontinuous media.

ANDY LUSTIG is the recipient of a grant from the Ford Foundation for support of an innovative research and policy project on the moral implications of biotechnology. The five-year "Altering Nature" project was started in 2001 while Dr. Lustig was at Rice University and will culminate in the publication of a major volume which will provide a comprehensive multidisciplinary, cross-traditional, and cross-temporal analysis of various modes of interpreting nature, how those interpretations influence religious understandings of nature, and the relevance of those insights to scholarly and public discussions of biotechnology issues.


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January 1, 2005 to June 30, 2005 

WOLFGANG CHRISTIAN and MARIO BELLONI have been awarded a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation under the Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement program.  This National Dissemination award will support the development of new upper-level curricular material by combining computational physics expertise with interactive engagement teaching techniques.  Co-principal investigators include Anne Cox (Eckerd College), Jan Tobochnik (Kalamazoo) and Harvey Gould (Clark University).

CINDY HAUSER has received a two-year grant from the Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society to conduct research on heterogeneous chemistry of gas-phase oxidants and organic aerosols.

ANNIE INGRAM's research on the culture of flowers in nineteenth-century America is being supported through a Francois Andre Michaux Fund Library Fellowship from the American Philosophical Society Library, a Research Support Grant from the Maine Women Writers' Collection, and an Ernestine Richter Avery Fellowship from the Huntington Library, and a Research Fellowship from the Winterthur Foundation.

ALAN MICHAEL PARKER received a one-month summer fellowship to attend the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, a 450 acre artists' colony located at Mr. San Angelo, Virginia.  his project is a collection of poems that explore various ideas related to the representation of animals, and how such images bear the burden of human desires.

MICHAEL DORCAS has been awarded a supplement to his National Science Foundation CAREER grant.  The award will provide funding during the academic year for two students to research the effects of urbanization on amphibians and reptiles.

A. MALCOLM CAMPBELL will serve as co-principal investigator on an NSF-funded grant to Edison Fowlks of Hampton University.  The award will support a DNA microarray summer workshop for undergraduate HBCU, HSI and Tribal College faculty to be held at Morehouse College in August, 2005.

CHRIS PARADISE
is the recipient of an Environmental Initiative Campus as Laboratory grant from the Associated Colleges of the South.  Funds will support a college-wide celebration of Earth Day.

GERARDO MARTI has been selected by the Congregational Studies Team to participate in the Engaged Scholars Project.  Selected Fellows receive mentoring while conducting research on the practices of local communities of faith.

CAROLE KRUGER is the recipient of a Canadian Studies Faculty Enrichment grant funded through the Canadian Embassy.  She will use the funds to attend a Quebec summer seminar and to conduct research at the University of Montreal and the University of Quebec in order to enhance the French department's survey course, "Quebec: Francophone Melting Pot."

GERARDO MARTI is the recipient of a Religious Institutions grant from The Louisville Institute.  The grant will support research between worship music and congregational diversity.

ERLAND STEVENS will use a Summer 2005 Associated Colleges of the South Technology Fellows grant to develop interactive we-based medicinal chemistry exercises.

MICHAEL DORCAS
has received additional funding from the Duke Energy Environmental Center to continue work on the Catawba River Coverboard Project.  The funds support data collection on animal species in the Catawba Corridor.

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