Accessibility Navigation:

Africana Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
AFR 101 Introduction to Africana Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

An introduction to the major issues and the different methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of people of African descent throughout the world.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement

   

AFR 120 Afro-Latin America (= LAS 120)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

From Mexico to Brazil and beyond, Africans and people of African descent have fought in wars of independence, forged mixed race national identities, and contributed politically and culturally to the making of the Americas.  Even though Latin America imported ten times as many slaves as the United States, only recently have scholars begun to highlight the role blacks and other people of African descent played in Latin American history.  This course will explore the experiences of Afro-Latin Americans from slavery to the present, with a particular focus on Haiti, Cuba, Mexico, Brazil, and Colombia.  In doing so, the course seeks to answer questions such as: What does it mean to be black in Latin America? Why has racism persisted in Latin America despite political revolutions claiming to eliminate discrimination? What are the links between blacks in Latin America and the United States? How have differing conceptions of "race" and "nation" caused the rise and decline of transnational black alliances between U.S. blacks and Afro-Latin Americans?  All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.  

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major or minor.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 235 The 1959 Cuban Revolution (=HIS 362, =LAS 235)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson  

This course explores the historical underpinnings of the 1959 Cuban Revolution, U.S.-Cuban relations, and how Cubans have experienced the changes the island has undergone in the past 100 years. Particular attention is given to people of African descent who make up over a one-third of the island's population. This Cuban narrative illuminates a variety of themes including the spread of U.S. imperialism, Cuba's fight for sovereignty, and race relations in the Americas.  

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies (Geographic Region: Latin American/Caribbean).
Satisfies a major or minor requirement in History.
Satisfies a major or minor requirement in Latin American Studies.
Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 250 Black Women in Contemporary Performance
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Amin

This course considers the ways in which Black women have operationalized performance as a site for cultural criticism and social commentary. Centering the work of artists including Josephine Baker, Katherine Dunham and others, students will investigate how the use of dance, music, song, costume and other performance elements are leveraged to both stabilize and interrupt audience assumptions about the possibilities of performance beyond entertainment or the stimulation of pleasure. The course will consider how notions of race, gender and sexuality are repeated as consistent performative acts and how these categories are crafted and expressed through the artistic choices of select Black women performers working across theatrical genres from the 1920s to the present.

Counts as an elective in the Cultural Production & Expression category of the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region = North America).
Satisfies a requirement in the Literary & Cultural Representations track of the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Counts as an elective for the Dance minor.
Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 251 Thugs, Jezebels, & Contemporary Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Dennie

In the months prior to the 2016 presidential election, race relations in the United States were propelled into the American public consciousness with great force, although race has continually exerted an omnipresent influence on contemporary politics. Beginning with Clarence Thomas's 1991 Supreme Court confirmation hearings, this course will survey how discourse on black femininity, masculinity, sexuality, and class has impacted American politics from 1991 to the present. Topics for consideration include welfare reform, reproductive justice, mass incarceration, backlash to Barack Obama's presidency, and white nationalist support for Donald Trump. Readings will also consider how black activists, lawyers, journalists, and politicians have responded to and resisted racism and sexism in contemporary politics.

AFR 266 Africa Shoots Back, in transl. (=FRE 366)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fache

Africa Shoots Back examines West African cinema from its beginnings in the early 1960s to today.  The selection of films exposes students to new voices, perspectives and representations of Francophone West Africa from a West African perspective.  We will discuss issues of decolonization and post-colonial cultural economy, as well as analyze traditional African narrative strategies and new and unconventional images.
 

Fulfills a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
Fulfills a requirement in the Film & Media Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Counts towards the French & Francophone Studies major and minor.
Satisfies requirement in Visual and Performing Arts.

AFR 282 African American Literature: 18th - 19th Century (=ENG 282)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

African American Literature from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 286 African American Literature: 1900- (=ENG 286)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

This course will introduce students to twentieth- and twenty-first century African American literature and literary criticism. It will bring together a wide range of readings from across genres and disciplines, attempting to sketch out the major aesthetic and political features of the black literary project. Authors will include Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Alain Locke, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Samuel R. Delany, Octavia Butler, Teju Cole, Claudia Rankine, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Fred Moten, and Colson Whitehead to name a few.

Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Counts as a humanities elective in the Africana Studies major.
Counts as an elective in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 292 "Fake News," Journalism and Ethics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bailey

Students will be taught how to use journalistic skills and ethics to better harness the power empathy adds to storytelling on extremely sensitive subjects such as race, politics, gender, etc. as well as learn how to navigate the world of political punditry and the growing fake news phenomenon.  The course will focus on how the media discourse marginalizes people of color, and African Americans in particular and how rhetorical shifts can lead to non-factual news reporting.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies a requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community Requirement.

AFR 297 Caribbean Literature (=ENG 297)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Flanagan

The Caribbean is key to any understanding of the New World. Caribbean Literature takes students beyond the islands' popular music, food, and landscapes to an understanding of the formation of cultures from Europe, Africa, and India that have produced two Nobel Laureates. In novels such as Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, we see how love leads to the death of a young woman in the attic in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. We'll understand, too, why and how Aime Cesaire rewrites Shakespeare's The Tempest to allow for the resurrection of the spirit of Caliban's mother, Sycorax. Students do not need to know theory to take this course.  

Students may retake this course for credit when the topic/readings change with instructor's permission.

Satisfies the diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 298 Race and American Journalism
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bailey

We know the names Trayvon Martin, Sandra Bland and Tamir Rice. But we should also know the name Damon Kearns, a young black man born in Davidson who killed the only officer to die while on duty in the town - while being killed by the officer. This class will include an exhaustive look into the 20th anniversary of Kearns' death as a way of exploring larger issues of race in American journalism.  This local case study will help to illumine a myriad of lessons for young journalists and social justice warriors on the intersection of race, media, crime and inequality in the 21st century, including many that are often misunderstood or overlooked.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies the Diversity requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

AFR 300 Afro-Cuban Feminisms (=LAS 300)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

Black and mulata women have participated in constructing Cubanidad (Cuban nationalism) since the beginning of the Cuban republic in 1902. However, the largely male-dominated national narrative that has made Che Guevara's "New Man" famous since 1959 frequently overshadows their interventions. Despite this public silence, Afro-Cubanas (Afro-Cuban women) have consistently challenged narratives of exclusion and contributed to antiracist and antisexist movements in Cuba. As theater critic, Inés María Martiatu Terry explained in 2011 one of the goals of the Afrocubanas movement is to "feminize negritude and to blacken feminism."  

This course will analyze Afro-Cubana feminisms through a close reading of the work of four key black and mulata intellectuals and activists-Sara Gómez, Nancy Morejón, Daisy Rubiera, and Gloria Rolando. In doing so, it seeks to trace the legacy of the many black and mulata women who participated in revolutionary Cuba from the 1960s to the present. In particular, the course will examine how Afro-Cubanas have challenged negative stereotypes about black women, worked both inside and outside of Cuba's state-sponsored women's movement, and fought to create space for racial and sexual rights. All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies.
Satisfies the Histories and Genealogies major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.

AFR 300-309 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Major Thinkers in Africana Studies courses expose students to classical and foundational figures whose works have helped to shape the disciplinary debates, theoretical contours, or methodological innovations of the field.  These seminars are designed to engage larger conceptual issues in Africana Studies through the close study of the written corpus of a major thinker in the discipline.   It is a topics course in intellectual history that enables students to gain competency in primary, secondary, biographical, theoretical, and/or literary works related to a single scholarly figure in Africana Studies.  Courses will draw upon notable scholars in both the African and African Diaspora intellectual traditions. 

AFR 301 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: Zora Neale Hurston
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bowles

Through the lens of Zora Neale Hurston's life and work as an anthropologist, this course examines the following:  the politics of language and inequality, the perils and sanctity of segregation and the value of imagination in ethnographic writing.  Works to be examined during the course are Hurston's biography, excerpts from her autobiography, plays, short stories, critical essays and one of her many novels.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies (Geographical Region: North America).
Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Anthropology.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

 

AFR 302 Black Aesthetics & Performance
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Amin

This course will examine the development of the Black Aesthetic from its genesis in the 1920s, through the Black Arts Movement and into the contemporary period.  Students will examine primary source documents and artistic/creative expressions from a range of disciplines (including dance, music, literature and visual art) to identify Black performance/expressive aesthetics and to engage art as a mechanism through which culture, politics and identity may speak.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region = North America).

AFR 303 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: W.E.B. Du Bois (=ENG 382)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

This course will introduce students to the major works of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois. Readings will include (in chronological order): The Philadelphia Negro (1899); The Souls of Black Folk (1903); Dark Princess (1928); Black Reconstruction in America (1935); Color and Democracy (1945); and The World and Africa (1947) to name a few. They will be supplemented with secondary readings by: Booker T. Washington, Michael Rudolph West, Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Hazel Carby, Paul Gilroy, Adolph Reed, Lewis Gordon, Marina Bilbija, C. L. R. James and others.

Satisfies a requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in English.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

AFR 320 Growing up Jim Crow (= EDU 320, SOC 320)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

Examines how a generation learned race and racism in the Age of Jim Crow. Through multiple and intersecting lenses, students will examine texts, such as oral histories, literary narratives, and visual representations of various topics.  Topics will include Jim Crow schooling, white supremacy, disenfranchisement, lynching, rape, resistance, interracial harmony, and desegregation.

Satisfies a requirement in the Sociology major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies a requirement in the Educational Studies minor.
Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

AFR 329 Women & Slavery in Black Atlantic
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Dennie

From the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries, over 12 million Africans were shipped to the New World. Of those who survived the Middle Passage, fewer than 500,000 arrived in the United States; the vast majority were dispersed throughout the Caribbean and South America. The experiences of enslaved women, as well as the relationships between free and enslaved women, are as diverse as the African diaspora. Given the broad geographical scope of Africans' arrivals in the New World, this course will offer a comparative examination of women and slavery in the Black Atlantic. Topics for consideration include black women's gendered experiences of slavery, white women's roles in slave societies, and women abolitionists. The course will also examine how African and European conceptions of gender shaped the institution of slavery in the New World. Particular attention will be devoted to slavery in Brazil, Cuba, the United States, the Caribbean, and West Africa.

AFR 330 Gender & Development in Sub-Saharan Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Harper-Shipman

Gender & Development in Sub-Saharan Africa

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

AFR 343 Memory and Meaning in African-American Culture (=SOC 343)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

(Cross-listed with SOC 343.) This seminar explores how individuals, groups, and societies both remember and forget through a case study of the history and culture of African-Americans in the United States.  Students will learn about various aspects of personal and social memory, such as autobiographical memory, collective remembering, and commemorative practices.  In addition, students will learn interdisciplinary methods and social theories that can help them unpack and understand meanings and messages in African-American memory work.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographical Region: North America).
Satisfies a requirement in the Sociology major.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 360 History of the Caribbean: Race, Nation, and Politics (= LAS 360, HIS 360)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

This course explores the history of the Caribbean from pre-Colombian times to the present. The goal of the class is to trace the emergence of modern Caribbean nations beginning from their status as slave colonies of the not-so-distant past within an emphasis on the central role the Caribbean islands have played in global history.  Particular emphasis is given to the maintenance of European and North American imperial enterprises and the elaboration of racial ideologies growing out of the diversity that has characterized the island populations.  Issues to be addressed include colonialism, piracy, sugar revolution, slavery and emancipation, national independence, tourism, and Caribbean migrations. Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica will be the main areas under consideration, although texts from other islands such as the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, and Martinique are included.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Latin America/Caribbean).
Satisfies a requirement in Latin American Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the History major or minor.
Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 364 Black Paris
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fache

Black Paris focuses on the deep engagement of peoples of African descent with the City of Light from Fredrick Douglass to Ta-Nehisi Coates. We will examine the full variety of black cultures that have taken shape in dialogue with Paris, including poetry, prose, journals and magazines, music, and film in English and French by African American (J. Baldwin, Richard Wright, etc.) as well as Francophone Caribbean (F. Fanon, A. Césaire) and African (A. Mabanckou, Manu Dibango) artists and intellectuals.

Satisfies a requirement in Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory.
Satisfies a
Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric  requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 371 Critical Race Theory in Education (=EDU 371)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kelly

This course introduces students to the development of critical race theory as a specific theoretical framework to explain or to investigate how race and racism are organized and operate within the United States.  The course will have a sociological focus with emphasis on critical race scholarship that includes, but is not limited to, an analysis of double consciousness, colorblindness, intersectionality, whiteness as property, racial microaggressions, and structures of power.  Students will also explore central tenets and key writings advanced in the 1990s primarily by African American, Latino/a, and Asian American scholars in law, education, and public policy.  The course is both reading intensive and extensive with a major writing assignment that addresses a theoretical problem that grows out of the course topics and discussions. 

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies a minor requirement in Educational Studies.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

AFR 374 Contemporary Race Theory (=SOC 374)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Ewoodzie

(Cross-listed with SOC 374.) Race, along with class and gender (and sexuality), continues to be one of the central themes in sociological research.  In most of the subfields of the discipline, researchers of all stripes believe race to be an explanatory variable.  This, however, does not mean that sociologists have one theory of race.  In fact, there are raging debates about exactly what they mean when they evoke the term.  In this class, we will engage with some of the most recent theories about race.  Because some of the debates are built on those of decades past, we will spend the first third of the course establishing the foundational terms of the conversations.  The second third will be organized around a handful of provocateurs.  We will read portions of their original offerings and then read responses from their critics.  The final third will focus on two topics that are proving to have significant impact on theorizing race: immigration and genomics.

 

Satisfies a requirement in the Sociology major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographical region: North America).

AFR 383 Black Literary Theory (=ENG 483)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bertholf

(Cross-listed with ENG 483)

This course will bring together readings both literary and critical/theoretical, beginning with Frantz Fanon's seminal Black Skin, White Masks (1952). Taking Fanon as its point of departure, then, this course will necessarily turn to a discussion of the recent discourse on Afro-pessimism and black optimism, attempting to introduce students to important issues and questions of race, race relations, anti-black racism, black sociality, the universality of whiteness, the fungibility of the black body, and of the vulnerability and precarity of black life; and together we will think more closely about how the complex and "unthinkable" histories of slavery, colonialism, and the Middle Passage, for examples, continue to challenge the representational limits and potentialities of traditional literary genres and modes of emplotment. In addition to Fanon, authors will include Orlando Patterson, Toni Morrison, Hortense Spillers, Saidiya Hartman, Frank Wilderson, Jared Sexton, and Fred Moten.

Counts as a humanities elective for the Africana Studies major.
Counts as a senior seminar and fulfills the diversity requirement for the English major.
Counts as a literature elective for the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

AFR 395 Seminar in Africana Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Seminar in advanced Africana Studies

AFR 400 Research Methods in Africana Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Harper-Shipman

Research Methods in Africana Studies

AFR 495 Africana Studies Capstone
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Harper-Shipman

Advanced Seminar in Africana Studies.

AFR 498 Advanced Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Africana Studies: Advanced Independent Study

AFR 499 Honors Thesis
Prerequisites & Notes

Africana Studies: Honors Thesis

AFR 300B Black Esthetics & Performance
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Amin

This course will examine the development of the Black Aesthetic from its genesis in the 1920s, through the Black Arts Movement and into the contemporary period.  Students will examine primary source documents and artistic/ creative expressions from a range of disciplines (including dance, music, literature and visual art) to identify Black performance/ expressive aesthetics and to engage art as a mechanism through which culture, politics and identity may speak.

 

ANT 205 Ethnic Relations and Social Media
ANT 232 Contemporary Ghanaian Society and Culture
ANT 233 Performance in West Africa
ANT 234 African Popular Culture
ANT 257 African Roots, American Soils
ANT 323 Human Rights in Latin America
ANT 335 Debunking Race
ANT 371 Ethnographic Writing and Research
ANT 372 Visualizing Anthropology
DAN 284 Dancing Diaspora: The African American Theatrical Dance Tradition
ECO 324 Labor Economics
EDU 250 Multicultural Education
EDU 260 Oppression & Education (=SOC 260)
EDU 290 Oral History: Problems, Perspectives, & Possibilities (=SOC 290)
EDU 320 Growing up Jim Crow (= AFR 320, =SOC 320)
EDU 340 Education in African American Society (=SOC 340)
EDU 371 Critical Race Theory in Education (=AFR 371)
ENG 220 Literary Analysis
ENG 282 African American Literature: 18th - 19th Century (=AFR 282)
ENG 284 African American Drama
ENG 286 African-American Literature: 1900- (=AFR 286)
ENG 290 World Literatures - South Africa & C. Europe
ENG 294 Harlem Renaissance
ENG 297 Caribbean Literature (=AFR 297)
ENG 340 Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature
ENG 382 W.E.B. Du Bois at Large (=AFR 303)
ENG 394 Studies in Modern Literature: The Avant-Garde (Fall 2017)
ENG 483 Black Literary Theory (=AFR 383)
FRE 335 French Colonial Empire
FRE 364 Paris Noir
FRE 366 Africa Shoots Back, in transl. (=AFR 266)
FRE 368 France and Métissage
GSS 201 Feminist and Queer Theories
HIS 162 Latin America to 1825
HIS 163 Place & Nation in Modern Latin America
HIS 168 Africa to 1800
HIS 169 The Making of Modern Africa
HIS 230 African Diasporas, German Encounters: Histories, Conflicts and Movements
HIS 259 US Latino/a History
HIS 267 Health and Society in Africa
HIS 302 African American History to 1877
HIS 303 African American Society & Culture since 1877
HIS 343 The Old South
HIS 344 The South since 1865
HIS 346 The Civil War and Reconstruction
HIS 357 The Civil Rights Movement in the United States
HIS 358 Civil Rights Wars, Civil Rights Warriors
HIS 360 History of the Caribbean: Race, Nation, and Politics (=AFR 360, =LAS 360)
HIS 362 The 1959 Cuban Revolution (=AFR 235, =LAS 235)
HIS 363 African Encounters with Development
HIS 364 Race, Sex, Power in Latin America
HIS 366 Slavery and Africa
HIS 369 Urban Africa
HIS 440 Slavery in the Americas
HIS 444 Southern Women, or How to Explain Scarlett and Mammy
HIS 449 Age of Revolution: The United States in the 1960s
HIS 451 African American Cultural History
HIS 464 Religion and Social Change in Latin America
HIS 465 Colonialism and Imagination in Early Latin America
HIS 466 Migrations and Immigration in Latin America
HIS 467 Family and Families in African History
HIS 469 Work, Gender, and Political Imagination in Africa
LAS 120 Afro-Latin America (= AFR 120)
LAS 235 The 1959 Cuban Revolution (= AFR 235, =HIS 362)
LAS 300 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: Afro-Cuban Feminisms (=AFR 300)
LAS 360 History of the Caribbean: Race, Nation, and Politics (= AFR 360, = HIS 360)
MUS 122 Music of the United States
MUS 232 Jazz
MUS 241 Music of Latin America
MUS 246 Music of Brazil
POL 201 Methods and Statistics in Political Science
POL 226 Racial and Ethnic Politics
POL 290 Politics of Africa
POL 347 Politics of Development
REL 261 African American Religious Traditions
REL 262 Imagining American Religion
REL 365 Women in American Religion
REL 444 Black and Womanist Theology
SOC 105 Race, Religion, & Donald Trump
SOC 205 Race and Ethnic Relations
SOC 227 Hip Hop and Urban Sociology
SOC 228 Sociology of Cities and Urban Life
SOC 247 Global Development & Underdevelopment
SOC 250 Housing
SOC 260 Oppression & Education (=EDU 260)
SOC 290 Oral History: Problems, Perspectives, & Possibilities (=EDU 290)
SOC 310 Gender, Race, and Sports
SOC 312 Gender, Race and Class in Media
SOC 320 Growing Up Jim Crow (= AFR 320, EDU 320)
SOC 340 Education in African American Society (=EDU 340)
SOC 371 Contemporary Race Theory
SOC 373 Contemporary Social Theory
SOC 390 Qualitative Research Methods
SOC 391 Survey Methodology
SOC 392 Quantitative Data Analysis
SOC 430 Race and Religious Faith
SPA 344 Latino Culture in the U.S.