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Communication Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
AFR 292 "Fake News," Journalism and Ethics
AFR 298 Race and American Journalism
ANT 205 Ethnic Relations and Social Media
ANT 310 Politics, Society, and Culture
ANT 343 Feminist Anthropology
ANT 357 Language Before History
ANT 372 Visualizing Anthropology
BIO 260 Perspective on Darwinism
CHI 405 Seminar: Modern Chinese Literature and Cinema
COM 101 Principles of Oral Communication
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall and Spring)

Instructor
Staff

Examination and implementation of both classical and contemporary principles of effective oral communication. Individual presentations informed by readings, discussions, lectures, and examinations of key speeches.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirements.

COM 201 Introduction to Communication Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

A survey of the nature and processes of communication. Begins with basic concepts of communication, including language, nonverbal processes, perception, listening, and adaptation to audiences; then examines communication in specific contexts, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, organizational, public, and mass communication.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirements.

Satisfies a Communication Studies Interdisciplinary minor requirement.

COM 202 Methods in Rhetorical Criticism
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hogan, Leslie

A survey of methods in rhetorical analysis of oral, written, and visual discourses. Covers neo-classical criticism, Burkean dramatism, narrative, metaphoric, genre, and social movement criticism, and various ideological and post-structural methods, including feminist criticism and postmodern criticism.

 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirements.
Satisfies a Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor requirement.

 

COM 218 Gendered Communication in Society (= SOC 218)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

Examination of the social construction of gender in both personal relationships and professional contexts. Areas to be explored may include culture, verbal and nonverbal communication, family dynamics and close relationships, education, organizational communication, and roles in media.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in Gender & Sexuality Studies and Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Liberal Studies requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

COM 225 Interpersonal Communication
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

A theoretical, practical, and experiential study of the selective, systemic, and individual transactions that allow people to reflect and build personal knowledge of one another and create shared meaning. Readings, discussions, and exercises focus on connecting concepts and models to everyday interactions. Included are issues of diversity, personal identity, human perceptions, language use, mindful listening, conflict management, and nonverbal communication.

Satisfies a Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor requirement.
Satisfies Liberal Studies requirement.
 

COM 230 Organizational Communication
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Study of how communication creates and sustains organizations and is coordinated and controlled to achieve collective outcomes. Such topics as leadership, globalization, workplace collaboration, diversity, and crisis communication will connect theoretical concepts and models to today's changing world.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.
Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.

COM 275 Mass Media & Society (= SOC 275)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

This course takes a critical approach to the study of the production and consumption of mass media, focusing on both the media industry in the United States and emerging forms of global media. Drawing upon various media-including television, radio, video games, and the Internet-the course will examine the economic and social organization of mass media, the content of media messages, the relationship between media and the public, the growth of new media technologies, and current dilemmas facing media policy makers. The course assumes that mass media and the industries that produce media products play significant cultural and political roles in contemporary societies.

Major credit in Sociology and Interdisciplinary Minor in Communication Studies.
Satisfies Social Science requirement.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

COM 280 Intercultural Communication
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Leslie

This course explores issues related to the intercultural communication process. We will consider the important role of context (social, cultural, and historical) in intercultural interactions. We will examine the complex relationship between culture and communication from three conceptual perspectives: the social psychological perspective, the interpretive perspective, and the critical perspective. It is through these three conceptual perspectives that we will strive towards a comprehensive picture of intercultural communication. From applying these approaches to the study of intercultural communication, we will also come to appreciate the complexity and dialectical tensions involved in intercultural interactions. This learning process should enhance self-reflection, flexibility, and sensitivity in intercultural communication which students will likely find useful whether interested in studying or working abroad or simply wanting to become better informed intercultural communicators in our increasingly diverse nation and world.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

COM 290 Persuasion and Propaganda
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hogan

Explores the distinction-theoretically, historically, and in contemporary public discourse- between persuasion and propaganda.  Surveys and provides background in the various meanings and applications of the terms persuasion and propaganda in theory and practice.  Through both scholarly research and case studies, it helps students become more sophisticated and critical consumers of persuasion and propaganda in the "marketplace of ideas." 

  • Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.
    Satisfies a Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
COM 315 Media Effects (= SOC 315)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

An exploration of relevant theories and practices of conducting media effects research in the mass mediated/disseminated communication contexts including television, radio, print, popular culture, internet, and other forms of new media. Topics include health, advertising, edutainment, stereotypes, violence, pornography, music videos, video games, news, and politics.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology.
Satisfies Communication Studies and Film and Media Studies interdisciplinary minor requirements.
Satisfies Liberal Studies requirement.
 

COM 328 Social Media's Impact on Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The oldest and most trusted form of human communication is word of mouth. The most developed and pervasive is mass media. Now comes social media, incorporating the qualities of both: word of mouth at the speed of light. Its existence is so new, its effects so stupefying, that few have paused from drinking it in long enough to contemplate how it works and where it is taking our world. Through this course, you will explore the underpinnings of social media, its widespread uses to date and the far-ranging effects those uses are having on culture, media, politics and business (often explained by visiting professionals in those fields). You will also complete a project that applies social media within your chosen field.

Satisfies a interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.
 

COM 350 Communication and Issues of Diversity (=SOC 350)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

The U.S. population continues to become increasingly more diverse, and this increased diversity creates newer, greater challenges for organizations (including government, nonprofit, and corporate entities) as well as for individual communicators. How do our upbringing and biases shape the way we characterize, interact with, and talk about others? The focus of this course is to introduce students to issues of power, race, class, and gender, as related to communication theory and practice.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Communication Studies.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

COM 365 Rhetorics of Justice and Equality
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hillard

Those who wish to promote social change have typically relied on language, perhaps our most important symbolic resource, to help them to define problematic social and political practices and to argue for new policies. How have persons and groups mobilized linguistic resources in order to argue for social change in the United States? Rhetoric-the study of how public understandings are shaped, shared, and changed through the agency of language-has since ancient times guided speakers and writers in the production of persuasive discourses. The course will examine several episodes of sharp disagreement in American life where civic roles and the rights of citizens have been contested. Using a rhetorical lens, we will analyze primary documents (written and spoken discourses produced during these episodes) in order to understand and evaluate the ways in which groups with unequal power have struggled to define some significant part of their common experience.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

COM 390 Special Topics - Voices of Democracy: Great Speeches in U.S. History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hogan

 This special topics course in Communication Studies introduces students to some of the most famous (and infamous) speeches and debates in U.S. history.   In this election year, we will study some memorable campaign speeches and debates,  but we also will consider how voices outside of the political mainstream-voices of protest and dissent-have sparked historic debates over civil rights, gender and sexuality, free speech and privacy rights, and other important issues.  Beyond learning about great speeches in history, students will reflect on how, in a free society, speech functions as a mechanism for defining our identity, reconciling our political and cultural differences, and affecting political and social change.  There are no prerequisites and the course is open to students from all classes and majors.

Special topics course titles and descriptions may change.  May be repeated for credit.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies a requirement in the Communication Studies major and interdisciplinary minor.

COM 395 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Communication Studies 101 or 201 and permission of the instructor. (Fall and Spring)

Instructor 
Staff

Independent work under the direction of a faculty member who determines the means of evaluation. Open to advanced students with special projects.

COM 495 Communication Theory and Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Students must have completed COM 201 and should have completed all other requirements for the interdisciplinary minor, although COM 101 or one elective may be taken concurrently.
Instructor's permission required.
(Spring)

Instructor
Martinez

The capstone course for the Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.  The study of a variety of theories of communication as they frame questions and enable the discovery of answers.  Theories cover basic conceptions of the communication process in interpersonal, public, and mass communication.  These theories, and exemplary research growing from them, provide the basis for the investigation of key questions concerning processes of communication. The course culminates in a major project bringing together a variety of theoretical perspectives.  

DAN 101 Introduction to Dance
DIG 210 Data Culture
ENG 201 Professional Writing
ENG 289 Environmental Literature
ENG 293 Film as Narrative Art
ENG 310 The English Language
ENG 388 Contemporary Theatre
ENG 393 Film Theory
FMS 220 Introduction to Film and Media Studies
FMS 321 Interactive Digital Narratives
GER 336 Memory on Film (in trans.)
HIS 245 Digital History of Early American Knowledge
HIS 255 American Popular Culture
HIS 358 Civil Rights Wars, Civil Rights Warriors
HIS 364 Race, Sex, Power in Latin America
HIS 427 European Consumer Culture: 1750 to the Present
HIS 451 African American Cultural History
PHI 102 Reason and Argument
POL 121 American Politics
POL 222 Parties and Interest Groups
POL 223 The Presidency
POL 328 Politics of Information
POL 330 Campaign Strategy
POL 334 Public Opinion
POL 398 Global Environmental Politics
REL 360 American Civil Religion
REL 365 Women in American Religion
SOC 205 Race and Ethnic Relations
SOC 217 Gender and Society
SOC 218 Gendered Communication in Society (= COM 218)
SOC 231 Leadership & Organizations
SOC 240 Social Movements
SOC 275 Mass Media & Society (= COM 275)
SOC 300 Education in African American Society
SOC 310 Gender, Race, and Sports
SOC 315 Media Effects (= COM 315)
SOC 331 Theoretical Explorations of Community Engagement
SOC 350 Communication and Issues of Diversity (=COM 350)
THE 362 Theatre for Social Justice