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Environmental Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
ANT 207 Foragers, Farmers, and Chiefs of the Ancient World
ANT 227 Environment and Culture in Latin America
ANT 261 Science, Policy, and Society
ANT 267 Food and Culture
ANT 271 Human Ecology
ANT 273 Bioarchaeology
ANT 310 Politics, Society, and Culture
ANT 325 Environment, Economy, & Culture
ANT 360 Anthropology of Development and Environmental Sustainability
ANT 372 Visualizing Anthropology
ANT 377 Imaging the Earth
ANT 382 Seminars in Anthropology: Renewable Natural Resources: Science & Policy (= BIO 366, ENV 366)
ART 130 Earth Art-From Lascaux to Lutyens
ART 220 The Greening of Modern Architecture
BIO 222 Vertebrate Zoology
BIO 227 Conservation Biology & Biodiversity
BIO 237 Biodiversity & Conservation
BIO 240 Biostatistics for Life Scientists
BIO 256 Applied Insect Ecology
BIO 257 Tree Taxonomy & Identification: Dendrology
BIO 267 Cases in Environmental Health
BIO 317 Entomology
BIO 321 Ecology
BIO 356 Diversity & Extinction Analysis (= ENV 356)
BIO 366 Renewable Natural Resources: Science & Policy (= ANT 382, ENV 366)
BIO 367 Ecotoxicology (= ENV 367)
CHE 220 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (=ENV 315)
CHE 371 Energy
CHE 372 Environmental Chemistry
ECO 226 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
ECO 235 Economics of South Asian Environmental Issues
ENG 289 Environmental Literature
ENV 100 Special Topic: TBD
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The Environmental Studies Department will welcome a new faculty member in the environmental social sciences in the 2018-19 academic year.  As of this time, the instructor and topic of the course are still to be determined, but the course will count toward the social sciences track of the Environmental Studies major and minor.

 

ENV 120 Introduction to Environmental Geology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Johnson

A study of basic geologic principles and critical issues in environmental geology on a global scale. Topics to be covered can include: minerals, rock types and cycles, earthquakes and tectonics, volcanoes, mass wasting, stream systems, coastlines, soils, water resources, mineral and rock resources, fossil fuels, and climate change. Generally, the class will divide time between learning introductory geologic principles and applying those principles to understand environmental issues associated with geology.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Natural Science requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Laboratory Science requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 150 Environmental Analysis with Econ Lens
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martin

The course will introduce students to thinking about interdisciplinary environmental issues as an economist does.  We will concentrate on a few economics themes and use topical issues to motivate and to illustrate interdisciplinary economic analyses.Note: The course does not earn economics credit and does not replace the Economics 101 prerequisite for any of the three Economics environmental courses (ECO 226, 235, or 236).  

Satisfies a major requirement in Environmental Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Environmental Studies

Satisfies the Liberal Studies Requirement

ENV 155 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The Environmental Studies Department will welcome a new faculty member in the environmental social sciences in the 2018-2019 academic year.  As of this time, the instructor and topic of the course are still to be determined, but the course will count toward the social sciences track of the ENV major and minor.

ENV 160 Environmental Justice
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Merrill

This course introduces students to the concepts, contexts, and conflicts of environmental justice, both in the U.S. and globally.  After covering some general history and theoretical frameworks, the course is organized according to six cases studies (Love Canal, Hurricane Katrina, Hydro-Quebec, US migrant farmworkers, Bhopal, and Ogoniland).  Throughout this interdisciplinary course based in the environmental humanities, students will make connections among various kinds of information sources (literary, documentary, ecocritical, theoretical, ethical, historical, etc.).  For the final course project, students will create their own environmental justice case study, based on a case not covered in class, and with their choice of relevant literary text, documentary film, and background readings.

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies major

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies minor

Satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

ENV 170 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kojola

Special Topics in Environmental Justice and Social Science

ENV 181 Food and Sustainability: Introduction to the Farm at Davidson
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

Did you know your college has a student farm? In this course, we will combine hands-on experience learning to grow food at the Farm at Davidson with readings, lectures and discussions that address local food systems. Our goal will be to critically analyze some of the issues facing our local food system through positive engagement with sustainable solutions. This course serves as a prerequisite for the spring research seminar where students will have an opportunity to conduct research at the Farm.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 200 Special Topic: TBD
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The Environmental Studies Department will welcome a new faculty member in the environmental social sciences in the 2018-19 academic year.  As of this time, the instructor and topic of the course are still to be determined, but the course will count toward the social sciences track of the Environmental Studies major and minor.

ENV 201 Environmental Science
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Overview of the scientific concepts, principles, processes, and methodologies required to understand how ecosystems work. This knowledge will be applied to selected environmental problems to help students understand the scientific basis, estimate the risks associated, and evaluate alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.  One laboratory meeting per week.

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Natural Science requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Laboratory Science requirement.

ENV 202 Environmental Social Sciences
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Staff

Overview of social science approaches to environmental issues, with problem-based and topical approaches to the study of interactions between society and the environment. This course teaches students to integrate concepts and the qualitative and quantitative methods of the social sciences (primarily anthropology, economics, geography, psychology, political science, and sociology) in interdisciplinary analyses of environmental issues.

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought requirement.

ENV 203 Environmental Humanities
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Overview of humanistic approaches to environmental issues, including perspectives from art, cultural studies, history, literature, philosophy, and religion.  This course emphasizes humanistic methodologies such as close reading and analysis of primary and secondary materials in both written and visual forms.

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement.

ENV 210 Introduction to Environmental Literature: Food Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Merrill

This course is for Foodies, Ag Activists, Farm Fans, and anyone who is interested in literature about food from a variety of perspectives.  We'll read fiction, poetry, and nonfiction about the pleasures of eating, the cultural and aesthetic significance of food, rural and urban agriculture, and food justice.  Field trips will include farm visits, and students will participate in hands-on, community-based assignments connected to the college's Food and Sustainability project. 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 220 Climate Systems: Present and Past
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Backus

The climate of the Earth is changing. It has always changed. It will continue to change. How do we assess the impact of humanity on climate? We need to understand how our Earth system works, now and in the past, if we expect to predict our climatic future. This course looks at the current climate system and explores the Earth archives that illuminate our climatic past.  Topics covered include: The Earth energy budget; the role of carbon dioxide and methane in short-term and long-term climate cycles; orbital cycles and the ice ages; Earth as a snowball; the Greenhouse Earth; ice cores and tree rings; oceanic and atmospheric circulation systems; and the impact of human activity on climate. Class discussions, demonstrations, and exercises provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and practice analytical techniques.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

Satisfies a requirement in Liberal Studies

ENV 232 Introduction to Environmental Health with Community-Based Learning (=HHV 232)
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 232 may not be taken for credit after ENV 233.

Instructors
Staff

Students will apply biological, chemical and epidemiological content to environmental health case studies and community-based learning projects. This is an introductory course designed to expose students to different scientific disciplines within the context of environmental health.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement.
 

ENV 233 Introduction to Environmental Health with Laboratory-Based Learning (=HHV 233)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Staff

Students will apply biological, chemical and epidemiological content to environmental health case studies and laboratory projects. This is an introductory course designed to expose students to different scientific disciplines within the context of environmental health. ENV 233 may not be taken for credit after ENV 232.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies the Natural Science requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 235 The Ocean Environment
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Backus

Covering 71% of the surface, yet mostly unexplored, the Earth's oceans are a source of food, hurricanes, used as a wastebasket by human kind, and a great unknown in our climate future. This introductory course covers the formation of ocean basins; the composition and origin of seawater; currents, tides, and waves; the ocean-atmosphere connection; coastal processes; the deep-sea environment; productivity and resources; marine pollution; and the influence of oceans on climate. The class will focus on how oceanic systems work with class discussions, demonstrations, and exercises providing opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and practice analytical techniques.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Liberal Studies requirement.

ENV 237 The Interdisciplinary Use of Geographic Information
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Backus

Geographic information is not bound to any particular way of knowing and can be used to visualize and  analyze spatial information of any type. This course will teach methods for using geographic information that will be applicable across the liberal arts. This course serves as an introduction to the ArcGIS software and will explore its abilities in a combination of inclass exploration, explanation, and exercises that teach the functionality of the software using interdisciplinary examples with a primary, but not exclusive focus, on environmental issues. For instance, we can visualize issues of environmental justice by mapping demographic data. Conservation issues can be better understood through mapping environmental data. Land use history can be explored through a blending of narrative, historical maps, and modern satellite imagery. In the later part of the course, we will spend time exploring and learning about some of the more interesting geostatistical tools available with the ArcGIS software. All skill levels with computers are welcome. Some comfort with PC-based software will be helpful at the start.

Counts as a methodology or elective course in the Environmental Studies major.
Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought requirement.

ENV 240 Indian Environment and Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor

Staff

This course, offered as part of the Davidson-in-India program, is an introduction to and comparative analysis of a variety of ecosystems in south India. Topics include tropical ecosystems' structure and dynamics, past and present human interaction with the landscape, adaptations of flora and fauna, and natural history, life history and human interactions and influences.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Liberal Studies requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies natural science without a lab requirement

ENV 241 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The Environmental Studies Department will welcome a new faculty member in the environmental social sciences in the 2018-2019 academic year.  As of this time, the instructor and topic of the course are still to be determined, but the course will count toward the social sciences track of the ENV major and minor.

ENV 250 Human Geography Theory and Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The core of geographic thought is a spatial understanding of nature-society interactions, and knowledge and theoretically informed practice that synthesizes across nature/society divides. The first part of this course explores major thinkers and key theoretical developments in the field of human geography, tracing the evolution of the discipline from its origins in classical thought to contemporary cutting edge theoretical discourses. This course explores geographic thought, various ways to ask geographic research questions, and appropriate methodologies to collect, analyze, and represent geographic data, through both quantitative and qualitative traditions. By exploring both theoretical underpinnings and current methodologies, this course provides insights into a profound discipline concerned with the myriad relationships between people and nature.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Social-Scientific requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Social Sciences Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

Not offered in 2016-2017.

ENV 256 Environmental History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Garcia Peacock
 

This course covers environmental interactions large and small, tracing the changing ways that Americans have shaped and thought about the places where they live and work. Course focuses on US environmental history from the colonial period to the present, including national parks, preservation, conservation, and wilderness; the relationship between the US and the rest of the world; and debates over what nature is, who it is for, and how it should be used.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies the Historical Thought requirement

ENV 273 Art, Activism, and Environment
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Garcia Peacock

In this course students will explore environmental themes in American visual culture. Taking the art related to the environmental justice movement as a point of departure, students will be exposed to a broad range of visual material that offers insight into how humans have advocated for a wide range of political opinions through their painting, sculpture, memorials, historical markers, roadside and yard installations, printmaking, murals, and the natural environment. Students will gain a strong sense of how this visual material not only has been used as important tools in inspiring political action but also how these materials also serve as important "texts" in documenting and preserving less well-known environmental perspectives.  

Satisfies the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major and interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ENV 278 Natural History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Merrill

Natural history is the close observation and detailed recording of the natural world.  This course explores the history, culture, and artistic productions of natural history, with an emphasis on the United States.  In addition to studying natural history, students will also become natural historians by developing their own skills of close observation and detailed recording of a local natural environment, in writing, sketching, and specimen collecting.

Satisfies a requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major and interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 283 Global Food Systems
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

Creating a sustainable world food system requires that we address both food security and sustainable food production in tandem, a clear case of intersecting challenges or "wicked" problems. Wicked problems are those issues that have so many relationships of causality and correlation that researchers and policy-makers sometimes do not know where to begin to address them. In this course, we will begin to investigate some of the ways we can understand and address the challenges of producing and provisioning food using the lens of sustainability.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 284 Latinxs and Environment (=LAS 284)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Garcia Peacock

In this course, students will examine a broad range of Latinx environmental experiences across time and place in the United States.  Taking the environment as a key category of analysis, students will explore the ways that the natural and built environments shape, and are shaped by, Latinx culture.  Looking to important rural, urban, suburban, and wilderness sites across the United States, students will construct a nuanced "picture" of how Latinx environments have changes over time.  With our methodology placed squarely in historical and visual analysis, we will frequently engage interdisciplinary approaches to enhance our understanding of key issues including: labor, migration, public health, community and neighborhood building, transportation networks, natural resource development, education, and tourism.  Students will be exposed to a wide range of human expressions of place, such as art, literature, and activism, to gain a better understanding of how Latinxs have represented their environmental experiences.

Satisfies the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major.
Fulfills the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.
 

ENV 285 Indigenous Perspectives on the Environment
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
A. Green

It is often posited that indigenous peoples possess a different relationship to and cosmology of the environment, of nature, of the natural world. In this course, we will interrogate this assumption through a series of case studies that examine indigenous experiences of natural and built environments.  Our guiding questions as we examine these case studies are: Does this collectivity express a unique perspective on the environment? How does that shape their relationship to their environments and the world at large? Are those relationships necessarily more sustainable? How can the natural world be managed according to these principles, or have we reached an impasse between resource extraction and resource renewal? We will use indigenous perspectives and experiences to examine issues that affect all of us: nonrenewable resource extraction, climate change, human-animal-plant relationships, the practice of science, and the limits to economic development.

You will leave the course with the ability to explain:
1) The adaptations of indigenous peoples as they confront threats to their well-being that have arisen through environmental misuse of the earth
2) Conflicts between indigenous dwellers, colonizing states and extractive industries happening on each continent
3) The conflicts and compromises between indigenous groups themselves as they struggle to make their ways in late capitalism
4) Various perspectives in the social sciences that conceptualize how we understand our natural worlds, including the ontologies and epistemologies of western science and indigenous traditional knowledges

Satisfies the depth component of the social science track and the breadth component of the natural science and humanities tracks of the Environmental Studies major.
Satisfies the social science requirement of the Environmental Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

ENV 290 Deserts
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Johnson, Merrill

Deserts are among the most hostile environments on earth for the survival of humans, yet their allure has resulted in profound impacts on civilizations. Religions view deserts paradoxically as places of isolation and of deep spiritual connection. Artists and writers exploit these sparse landscapes of seemingly infinite vistas to highlight the singular aesthetics of this (allegedly) empty wilderness.  Geologists have long asserted that deserts are so unique that they require their own set of processes to explain the landforms. Climatologists realize that deserts are not local phenomena, but rather are globally forced features based on worldwide circulation and heating patterns.  In this transdisciplinary and team-taught course, students will learn about deserts from multiple perspectives and through approaches both humanistic and scientific. 

 

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science or Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major and interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement.

ENV 295 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Staff

Under the direction of an ENV Core faculty member, the student learns environmental studies material through a structure that primarily resembles a typical course or through independent research at an introductory level.

ENV 300 Special Topic: TBD
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The Environmental Studies Department will welcome a new faculty member in the environmental social sciences in the 2018-19 academic year.  As of this time, the instructor and topic of the course are still to be determined, but the course will count toward the social sciences track of the Environmental Studies major and minor.

ENV 303 Research Seminar in Food and Agriculture Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

In this course, you will gain hands-on experience conducting social science research in the discipline of food and agriculture studies. Our research site is The Farm at Davidson College. Our goal is to design and implement a group study that measures the Farm holistically along the three dimensions of sustainability: environmental, economic and social sustainability. As a student in this class, you will be held to high expectations. Not only will you be responsible for reading assigned materials, you will be expected to conduct yourself as a professional scholar responsible for developing research questions, collecting, analyzing, storing and presenting data in an ethical, confidential and transparent manner. Our course will culminate in a presentation of our findings to the Davidson College community. Students in this course are expected to already have a working knowledge of the Farm at Davidson College. Please contact the instructor if you would like to enroll in the course and need extra material to familiarize yourself with the Farm.

Satisfies a requirement in the social science track in the Environmental Studies major.
Satisfies the social science breath course in the Environmental Studies Interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 315 Analytical Chemistry I (= CHE 220)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Blauch, Hauser

Topics in chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, chromatography, and nuclear chemistry, with applications in biological, environmental, forensic, archaeological, and consumer chemistry. Laboratory experiments include qualitative and quantitative analyses using volumetric, electrochemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic methods.


Satisfies the Natural Science requirement.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 330 Surface Geology and Landforms
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 120 or ENV 201 or instructor permission.

Instructor
Johnson

A detailed survey of processes in surface geology including weathering, soils, landslides, stream systems, glaciers, and climate as well as differences between these processes in various environments.  The class will split time between learning and discussion of geomorphic principles and practicing them in the field.  The class will be roughly based around the collection of new field data for an overarching class project.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in the Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 331 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The Environmental Studies Department will welcome a new faculty member in the environmental social sciences in the 2018-2019 academic year.  As of this time, the instructor and topic of the course are still to be determined, but the course will count toward the social sciences track of the ENV major and minor

ENV 335 Soil Science
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 120 or ENV 201 or instructor permission.

Instructor
Johnson

Understanding geologic landscapes and surficial processes requires a multidisciplinary understanding of soils.  This course will examine soils with a focus on soil-forming processes and morphology.  In the classroom, students will learn the terminology and concepts of soil genesis, soil taxonomy, and soil morphology.  These concepts will then be applied in the field so that students can learn to identify and interpret horizonation and morphological characteristics. 

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in the Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 351 Environmental Social Movements
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kojola

Environmental Social Movements

ENV 356 Diversity & Extinction Analysis (= BIO 356)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 and BIO 227 or 321 is required.  Completion of BIO 240 is recommended.

Instructor
K. Smith

This group investigation course focuses on the analysis of patterns of biodiversity and biodiversity loss. Students conduct literature reviews to compile data on biodiversity and/or extinction events to identify patterns of biodiversity, biodiversity function, and extinctions, with the goal of understanding the causes and consequences of biodiversity variation and loss. An emphasis is placed on the analysis of biodiversity data and the development of novel analyses to address issues such as sampling effects, extinction bias, random extinction, and emergent properties of biodiversity. The course culminates with a group project that addresses student-driven questions via the application of analyses developed during the semester.

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 366 Renew Natural Resources: Science and Policy (= BIO 366, ANT 382)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Lozada, Paradise

This interdisciplinary seminar course focuses on developing a scientific understanding of renewable natural resources such as fisheries and forests and how resources are then used, overused, managed, and conserved by humans.  The course primarily consider smodern methods of resource management, including adaptive and ecosystem-based management.  The course builds upon knowledge gained in the foundation courses of Anthropology, Biology, or Environmental Studies.  It addresses natural resource and environmental issues from ecosystem and policy perspectives.  Through case studies, readings, class discussions, and knowledge construction, students gain deep knowledge of ecosystem ecology and management policies and approaches.  Students then apply their knowledge to identify management principles that are consistent with a more holistic ecosystem approach and develop a case study of one natural resource and how it is managed.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural or Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor or the breadth requirement of the Humanities track.

ENV 367 Ecotoxicology (= BIO 367)
Prerequisites & Notes

BIO 111 and 112 (or 113 and 114) or ENV 201 required and permission of the instructor required; CHE 115 recommended.

Instructor
Paradise

Ecotoxicology is the science that examines the fate and effects of toxicants in and on ecological systems.  While toxicology examines effects at molecular, cell, and organism levels, effects at higher levels are not always predictable based on findings at lower levels. Ecotoxicology integrates effects at multiple levels of biological organization.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 385 Group Investigation - Environmental Humanities
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 203 or permission of the instructor

Group Investigations in the Environmental Humanities provide students with specialized training in various research methodologies relevant to the environmental humanities.

Satisfies the depth or breadth requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major.
Counts as an additional course in the environmental humanities in the Environmental Studies interdisciplinary minor.
 

FALL 2018 TOPIC
Group Investigation - Botanical Humanities
Instructor -
Merrill

This Group Investigation in the Botanical Humanities will give students experience in conducting original archival research; analyzing literature, primary sources, and material culture; and writing a research article for a scholarly audience, all related to the study of amateur botanists and popular botany in the nineteenth-century US.

 

ENV 395 Independent Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Under the direction of an ENV Core faculty member, the student engages in independent research at an advanced level.

ENV 495 Independent Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Under the direction of an ENV Core faculty member, the student engages in independent research at a very advanced level.

ENV 497 Honors Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Under the direction of an ENV Core faculty member, the student engages in research as part of pursuing Honors in Environmental Studies.

ENV 498 Environmental Studies Capstone I
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 201, ENV 202, ENV 203. Offered in the Fall. 

Instructors
B. Johnson, Merrill

In collaboration with their capstone mentor, students will formally propose and carry out a project based on fieldwork and/or substantive library research in the area of the student's depth component track - Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Humanities, or self-designed.  Projects will demonstrate an integration of the methods and theory appropriate to the student's depth component by investigating a question or problem that is significant, situated, and original in its application within the context of Environmental Studies.

Satisfies major requirement in Environmental Studies.

ENV 499 Environmental Studies Capstone II
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 498. Offered in the Spring.

Instructors
Hauser and Merrill

The goal of this course is to integrate the depth and breadth components of the Environmental Studies major as a complement to Capstone I.  The students will integrate information, concepts and methods learned in their previous courses to explore an environmental theme through an interdisciplinary lens, over a range of geographical scales and accounting for a variety of perspectives.

Satisfies major requirement in Environmental Studies.
 

EVN 351 Special Topics in Environmental Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Special Topics in Environmental Studies

HHV 232 Introduction to Environmental Health with Community-Based Learning (=ENV 232)
HHV 233 Introduction to Environmental Health with Laboratory-Based Learning (= ENV 233)
HHV 234 Genes, Environment and Health
HIS 244 Settlement of the American West, 1800-1900
HIS 365 Environmental History
LAS 284 Latinxs and Environment (=ENV 284)
PHI 140 Environmental Ethics
PHY 103 Physics of the Environment
PHY 104 Physics of the Environment with Lab
POL 228 US Environmental Politics and Policy
POL 328 Politics of Information
POL 398 Global Environmental Politics
POL 400 Seminars in Political Theory, POL 400-419
POL 472 Citizens vs. Consumers
REL 247 Food in Religious Perspective
REL 248 Christianity and Nature
REL 250 Issues in Theological Ethics
REL 358 Humans and Other Animals