Environmental Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
ANT 207 Foragers, Farmers, and Chiefs of the Ancient World
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Ringle

The development of human society from the late Ice Age through complex agricultural communities. Topics include hunting and gathering, post-glacial adaptation, world colonization, causes and consequences of agriculture, and the rise of social inequality. Examples include the Near East, Europe, North America, and Polynesia.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ANT 227 Environment and Culture in Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring; offered alternating years.)

Instructor
Samson

This course addresses human-environment relations in Latin America from the standpoint of environmental history and ethnographic case studies in the region. Issues such as biodiversity, land use and agriculture, transnational flows of natural and food resources, ethnoecology, and social mobilization around environmental issues are examined using theoretical perspectives from cultural and political ecology.  Particular attention is given to the relationship between indigenous peoples and the environment and to alternative models of "development" in Mesoamerica, the Andes, and Brazil.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ANT 261 Science, Policy, and Society
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Lozada

Inquiry into the production and cultural meanings of scientific knowledge and technological change. Comparison of the function and rhetoric of scientific "truths" to other modes of truth-production, such as religion, and its application in policy. Topics include the conflict and dialogue between science and religion, rationality, the practice of science, environmental issues, and social change.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ANT 267 Food and Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Lozada

This course introduces the ways in which food practices shape societies and cultures throughout the world. Food ways will be examined from an anthropological perspective for their social and cultural implications; this is not a survey of nutritional or dietetic sciences. Topics to be covered include: the use of food in social contexts, the symbolism of food, and the political economy of food.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ANT 271 Human Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Cho

Human biological variation among and within living populations. Evolutionary, genetic, ecological, demographic, and especially cultural factors that contribute to biological variation are explored. Topics include biological adaptations to hot/cold climates, high altitudes, and lactose intolerance, among others.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ANT 273 Bioarchaeology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Cho

The study of human and non-human remains from archaeological sites to reconstruct past human behavior and biology, and their environmental and cultural conditions. Topics include human skeletal indicators of diet, activity level, and disease, and faunal skeletal indicators of ancient human behavior, such as hunting and paleoecology.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth (not breadth) course requirement in the Natural Science and Social Science tracks of the Environment Studies major.

ANT 310 Politics, Society, and Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Staff

Examines authority, organization, power, and legitimization of authority using a comparative perspective. Community-based learning model facilitates exploration of environmental justice and grassroots change with an emphasis on the symbolic aspects of power, structural inequity, and social movements.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ANT 325 Environment, Economy, & Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Samson

Cultural perspectives on human-environment relations and linkages between the environment and the global economy. Special emphasis on the integration of current knowledge in ecological anthropology, economic production, and the impact of human activity on the environment. Environmental justice issues and proposals for sustainable development are included.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ANT 360 Anthropology of Development and Environmental Sustainability
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Samson

Issues of development and sustainability from the standpoint of environmental anthropology and anthropological approaches to development theory. Considers the human face of development, including local and global scales of analysis, environmental justice, and discourses of community sustainability.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ANT 372 Visualizing Anthropology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Lozada

Introduction to the theories and methods necessary for making ethnographic films. Students will conduct fieldwork and make a documentary film on a particular aspect of social and cultural behavior. Emphasis is placed on developing the critical skills needed for resolving some of the ethical, technical, and aesthetic problems that may emerge during the documentation of social and cultural behavior.

One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

ANT 377 Imaging the Earth
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017; offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Ringle

The use of geographical information systems (GIS) to analyze, model, and present spatial relationships in the biological and social sciences, supplemented by other packages such as Google Earth. Field collection of spatial data with GPS units. Course is computer-based and emphasizes individual research projects.

One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

ANT 382 Seminars in Anthropology: Renewable Natural Resources: Science & Policy (= BIO 366, ENV 366)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ANT 101, ENV 201, or ENV 202 is required. (Not offered 2016-2017)

Instructors
Lozada, Paradise

This interdisciplinary seminar course focuses on developing a scientific understanding of renewable natural resources such as fisheries and forests and how resources are then used, overused, managed, and conserved by humans.  The course primarily consider smodern methods of resource management, including adaptive and ecosystem-based management.  The course builds upon knowledge gained in the foundation courses of Anthropology, Biology, or Environmental Studies.  It addresses natural resource and environmental issues from ecosystem and policy perspectives.  Through case studies, readings, class discussions, and knowledge construction, students gain deep knowledge of ecosystem ecology and management policies and approaches.  Students then apply their knowledge to identify management principles that are consistent with a more holistic ecosystem approach and develop a case study of one natural resource and how it is managed.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural or Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor or the breadth requirement of the Humanities track.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

ART 220 The Greening of Modern Architecture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Ligo
 

Architecture and Environmental Studies are natural companions.  Unfortunately developments in the history of modern architecture until the final third of the twentieth century rarely acknowledged their companionship.  During the past fifty years, however, there has been an explosion of theoretical writing and architectural practice to redress this oversight.  The focus of the assigned readings in this course will familiarize the participants with the leading theorists in the field of sustainable architecture, and enable them to design a private dwelling that is both modern and sustainable.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
 

ART 230 Earth Art-From Lascaux to Lutyens
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Ligo

The world history of garden design as a manifestation of humanity's ever-changing relationship with the natural world. Important gardens and their creators will be studied in light of the theology, politics, architecture, painting, theatre and stage design, poetry, and philosophy that shaped them.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
 

BIO 222 Vertebrate Zoology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B. Not open to students with credit for BIO 232

Instructor
Stanback

Natural history of vertebrates (fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, birds) emphasizing phylogeny, adaptations, ecology, and behavior. Laboratory sessions involve field experiments, identification of local tetrapods, and some dissection.  One weekend field trip is required.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

 

BIO 227 Conservation Biology & Biodiversity
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO112/114, ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructor
K. Smith

This course focuses on the scientific study of biological diversity, its rapid loss in recent decades, and approaches for its conservation.  Broad topics include the definition and measurement of biodiversity, the value of biodiversity to humans, causes of biodiversity loss and extinction in the modern world, how biodiversity can be managed and conserved, as well as the challenges posed by the human dimensions of biodiversity and conservation.  Students will focus intensively on the primary literature in this course, with an emphasis on the interpretation of data and the design of investigations in conservation biology.  After completing this course, students should be able to apply the scientific method, data analysis, biological theory, and critical thought to real-world conflicts between human needs and the conservation of biological diversity.  The laboratory focuses on biodiversity and conservation assessment including field work and occasional field trips.

Satisfies Natural Science distribution requirement. Satisfies a depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Enviromental Studies major or minor.
 

BIO 240 Biostatistics for Life Scientists
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, or ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.   

Instructors
Peroni, Pittman, K. Smith

Probability, descriptive statistics, and proper application, interpretation, and reporting of inferential statistics for biological research.  Instruction in experimental design and use of statistical and graphics software. Recommended for pre-med and pre-veterinary students as well as those who plan to enroll in Biology group investigation or independent study courses.

Satisfies Mathematical & Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the methodology course requirement for the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major.

BIO 256 Applied Insect Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of instructor is required.

Instructor
Paradise

This group investigation course examines applied ecology problems in insect pollinator communities and/or populations of urban forest pests.  Pollinator communities may be adversely affected in an urbanizing landscape, while a forest pest may actually benefit in the same landscape.  Students investigate the effects of park size, location, surrounding land use, and plant diversity on insect pollinator diversity.  Students may also investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics of the fall cankerworm as well as assess the effectiveness of control efforts.  Projects have community-based learning and outreach components.  Students study insect population and community ecology, learn basic GIS and other digital skills, insect identification, and hone skills in experimental design, data analysis, and science communication.

BIO 257 Tree Taxonomy & Identification: Dendrology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of instructor is required.

Instructor
Peroni

This group investigation course provides a survey of the taxonomy of woody plants and an introduction to the major forest biomes of the mountain and piedmont regions of North Carolina and southwestern Virginia.  Students learn how to identify trees, shrubs, and woodly vies using summer and winter characteristics.  Class meetings emphasize time spent in the field.

BIO 267 Cases in Environmental Health
Prerequisites & Notes

Sucessful completion of BIO 111/113, BIO 112/114, or ENV 201 is required.  

Instructor
Bernd

Environmental health focuses on the factors external to people that have health implications.  In this seminar students develop skills in literature research, critical analysis, and communication exploring the intersection between cell biology, public health, and the environment.  Broad topics include regional and global examples investigating air quality, water quality, and exposure to environmental chemicals.  In groups, students define sub areas of interest such as home air quality, water purification byproducts, or mercury.  Students use research, creativity, and communication skills to compile materials and write case studies that are appropriate for use in undergraduate cell biology courses.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 317 Entomology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of instructor is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructor 
Paradise

Biology of insects and related arthropods, structured around application and investigation of issues such as medical entomology, evolutionary history, biodiversity and systematics of insects, forensic entomology, conservation, and ecology.  Major emphasis in the laboratory involves an independent research project, field trips, and the making of a collection of local insects.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 321 Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114, ENV 201, or permission of the instructor is required.  One laboratory meeting per week.  Satisfies Group B.

Instructors
Paradise, Peroni

The study of interactions between organisms and their environment at the levels of populations, communities, and ecosystems.  Course includes lab with investigative and independent field experiments. 

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 356 Diversity & Extinction Analysis (= ENV 356)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 and BIO 227 or 321 is required.  Completion of BIO 240 is recommended.

Instructor
K. Smith

This group investigation course focuses on the analysis of patterns of biodiversity and biodiversity loss. Students conduct literature reviews to compile data on biodiversity and/or extinction events to identify patterns of biodiversity, biodiversity function, and extinctions, with the goal of understanding the causes and consequences of biodiversity variation and loss. An emphasis is placed on the analysis of biodiversity data and the development of novel analyses to address issues such as sampling effects, extinction bias, random extinction, and emergent properties of biodiversity. The course culminates with a group project that addresses student-driven questions via the application of analyses developed during the semester.

BIO 361 Amphibian & Reptile Conservation
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 and permission of instructor are required.

Instructor
Staff

A seminar-style course where students focus on discussion of the major issues in the conservation of amphibians and reptiles worldwide.  The course involves numerous guest speakers, student-led discussions, and a major project requirement that contributes to amphibian and reptile conservation.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or minor.

BIO 366 Renewable Natural Resources: Science & Policy (= ANT 382, ENV 366)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114, ANT 101, ENV 201, or ENV 202 is required.

Instructors
Lozada, Paradise

This interdisciplinary seminar course focuses on developing a scientific understanding of renewable natural resources such as fisheries and forests and how resources are then used, overused, managed, and conserved by humans.  The course primarily consider smodern methods of resource management, including adaptive and ecosystem-based management.  The course builds upon knowledge gained in the foundation courses of Anthropology, Biology, or Environmental Studies.  It addresses natural resource and environmental issues from ecosystem and policy perspectives.  Through case studies, readings, class discussions, and knowledge construction, students gain deep knowledge of ecosystem ecology and management policies and approaches.  Students then apply their knowledge to identify management principles that are consistent with a more holistic ecosystem approach and develop a case study of one natural resource and how it is managed.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural or Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor or the breadth requirement of the Humanities track.

BIO 367 Ecotoxicology (= ENV 367)
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/14 or ENV 201 is required as well as permission of the instructor.  CHE 115 is recommended.

Instructor
Paradise

Ecotoxicology is the science that examines the fate and effects of toxicants in and on ecological systems.  Although toxicology examines effects at molecular, cell, and organism levels, effects at higher levels are not always predictable based on findings at lower levels.  Ecotoxicology integrates effects at multiple levels of biological organization.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

BIO 397 Invasion Biology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 or ENV 201 and permission of the instructor are required.

Instructor
Staff

Invasive species represent one of the biggest threats to biodiversity and ecosystems worldwide.  In this seminar-style course students focus on developing an understanding of the major issues related to biological invasions.  The class involves in-depth, student-led discussions of peer-reviewed publications, guest speakers, and a class project.

CHE 220 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry (=ENV 315)
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 115. One laboratory meeting per week. (Fall)

 

Instructors
Blauch, Hauser

Topics in chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, chromatography, and nuclear chemistry, with applications in biological, environmental, forensic, archaeological, and consumer chemistry. Laboratory experiments include qualitative and quantitative analyses using volumetric, electrochemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic methods.


Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.

 

CHE 371 Energy
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 260. No laboratory. (Not offered 2016-17)

Instructor
Striplin

Course focuses on energy fundamentals such as the various guises of energy, combustion, inescapable inefficiencies, electric generation, and the planet's energy balance. Unsustainable energy technologies (coal, oil, gas, nuclear, and hydropower), sustainable energy technologies (solar, photovoltaics, wind, wave and tidal, biomass, geothermal, and fusion), and other fuel technologies such as hydrogen/fuel cells, carbon sequestration, and syngas production will be discussed and, in some cases, demonstrated.


Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

CHE 372 Environmental Chemistry
Prerequisites & Notes

Chemistry 220. No laboratory. (Not offered 2016-17)

Instructor
Hauser

Introduction to environmental chemical principles and methodology including aspects of the chemistry of air, water, and soil; identities, sources, properties, and reactions of pollutants; green chemical approaches to pollution prevention; environmentally-benign synthetic methodologies, design of safer chemical products, alternative solvents and catalyst development, and applications of biomimetic principles.


Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ECO 226 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics
Prerequisites & Notes

Economics 101 required; Calculus I or equivalent recommended.

Instructor
Martin

Focuses on the application of economic tools to the evaluation of environmental amenities, the analysis of pollution control policies, the uses of renewable and nonrenewable resources, and the protection of biodiversity.  Examines the strengths and weaknesses of the economic approach to those issues.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement. 
Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ECO 235 Economics of South Asian Environmental Issues
Prerequisites & Notes

Economics 101.

Instructor
Martin

The goal of this course is for students to learn about the economics of environmental issues in South Asia (defined here as Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka). The economic tools will include externalities and consideration of common and open access goods. The issues discussed will be topical, and the students will get to choose a topic for their research project.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies a Social Scientific Thought Distribution Requirement.

ENG 281 Contemporary Southern Literature - (= ENV 281)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangrum

A survey of literature from the Contemporary South, with particular attention to the ecological challenges and tumultuous environmental history of the region.  Familiarity with Southern literature is not a requirement.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
During 2016-2017, satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
 

ENG 289 Environmental Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangrum

Overview of environmental literature from Thoreau to the present day.  Generally focuses on the enviornmental literature of the United States, but may include other English-language literature.  Designed for both majors and non-majors.


Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Enviornmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 389 Posthumanism
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor 
Mangrum

This course will reexamine the idea of "the human." Readings will be drawn from graphic novels, post-apocalyptic narratives, classical and contemporary theory, science fiction, and recent work in cultural and environmental criticism. Through our reading, we will reconsider the distinctions between humans, nonhumans, and the idea of the natural. The often-porous borders between species, technologies, and environments will also allow us to ask questions about the future of the humanities. If we unsettle prevailing assumptions about the meaning of "the human," what will the humanities look like in the coming decades? What is the future of humanistic study in an age when digital technologies have become a common feature of everyday life and environmental crises pose existential threats to the planet and our species?

In order to reconsider what we mean when we talk about "the human," we will need to trek across diverse intellectual terrain. We'll consider narratives that imagine a future continuum of human-cyborgs, reflect on vast spatial-temporal scales that call into question the significance of our species, probe the assumptions about race and gender underlying popular American ideas about nature, and evaluate scenarios in which the natural becomes "uncanny" even as the technological becomes "organic."

The course will require three seminar-style projects, regular engagement in discussion, and a final class assignment in which students imagine the future shape, practices, and concerns of the humanities. 


Satisfies the Literary, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 120 Introduction to Environmental Geology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Johnson

A study of basic geologic principles and critical issues in environmental geology on a global scale. Topics to be covered can include: minerals, rock types and cycles, earthquakes and tectonics, volcanoes, mass wasting, stream systems, coastlines, soils, water resources, mineral and rock resources, fossil fuels, and climate change. Generally, the class will divide time between learning introductory geologic principles and applying those principles to understand environmental issues associated with geology.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Laboratory Science distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 150 Environmental Analysis with Econ Lens
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martin

The course will introduce students to thinking about interdisciplinary environmental issues as an economist does.  We will concentrate on a few economics themes and use topical issues to motivate and to illustrate interdisciplinary economic analyses.Note: The course does not earn economics credit and does not replace the Economics 101 prerequisite for any of the three Economics environmental courses (ECO 226, 235, or 236).  

Satisfies a major requirement in Environmental Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Environmental Studies

Satisfies the Liberal Studies Distribution Requirement

ENV 160 Environmental Justice
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Merrill

This course introduces students to the concepts, contexts, and conflicts of environmental justice, both in the U.S. and globally.  After covering some general history and theoretical frameworks, the course is organized according to six cases studies (Love Canal, Hurricane Katrina, Hydro-Quebec, US migrant farmworkers, Bhopal, and Ogoniland).  Throughout this interdisciplinary course based in the environmental humanities, students will make connections among various kinds of information sources (literary, documentary, ecocritical, theoretical, ethical, historical, etc.).  For the final course project, students will create their own environmental justice case study, based on a case not covered in class, and with their choice of relevant literary text, documentary film, and background readings.

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies major

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies minor

Satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity requirement

ENV 181 Food and Sustainability: Introduction to the Farm at Davidson
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

Did you know your college has a student farm? In this course, we will combine hands-on experience learning to grow food at the Farm at Davidson with readings, lectures and discussions that address local food systems. Our goal will be to critically analyze some of the issues facing our local food system through positive engagement with sustainable solutions. This course serves as a prerequisite for the spring research seminar where students will have an opportunity to conduct research at the Farm.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 201 Environmental Science
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Overview of the scientific concepts, principles, processes, and methodologies required to understand how ecosystems work. This knowledge will be applied to selected environmental problems to help students understand the scientific basis, estimate the risks associated, and evaluate alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.  One laboratory meeting per week.

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Laboratory Science distribution requirement.

ENV 202 Environmental Social Sciences
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Staff

Overview of social science approaches to environmental issues, with problem-based and topical approaches to the study of interactions between society and the environment. This course teaches students to integrate concepts and the qualitative and quantitative methods of the social sciences (primarily anthropology, economics, geography, psychology, political science, and sociology) in interdisciplinary analyses of environmental issues.

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Social Science distribution requirement.

ENV 203 Environmental Humanities
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Overview of humanistic approaches to environmental issues, including perspectives from art, cultural studies, history, literature, philosophy, and religion.  This course emphasizes humanistic methodologies such as close reading and analysis of primary and secondary materials in both written and visual forms.

Satisfies a requirement for the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

ENV 210 Introduction to Environmental Literature: Food Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangrum

This course is for Foodies, Ag Activists, Farm Fans, and anyone who is interested in literature about food from a variety of perspectives.  We'll read fiction, poetry, and nonfiction about the pleasures of eating, the cultural and aesthetic significance of food, rural and urban agriculture, and food justice.  Field trips will include farm visits, and students will participate in hands-on, community-based assignments connected to the college's Food and Sustainability project. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 220 Climate Systems: Present and Past
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Backus

The climate of the Earth is changing. It has always changed. It will continue to change. How do we assess the impact of humanity on climate? We need to understand how our Earth system works, now and in the past, if we expect to predict our climatic future. This course looks at the current climate system and explores the Earth archives that illuminate our climatic past.  Topics covered include: The Earth energy budget; the role of carbon dioxide and methane in short-term and long-term climate cycles; orbital cycles and the ice ages; Earth as a snowball; the Greenhouse Earth; ice cores and tree rings; oceanic and atmospheric circulation systems; and the impact of human activity on climate. Class discussions, demonstrations, and exercises provide opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and practice analytical techniques.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

Satisfies a distribution requirement in Liberal Studies

ENV 232 Introduction to Environmental Health with Community-Based Learning (=HHV 232)
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 232 may not be taken for credit after ENV 233.

Instructors
Staff

Students will apply biological, chemical and epidemiological content to environmental health case studies and community-based learning projects. This is an introductory course designed to expose students to different scientific disciplines within the context of environmental health.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

ENV 233 Introduction to Environmental Health with Laboratory-Based Learning (=HHV 233)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Staff

Students will apply biological, chemical and epidemiological content to environmental health case studies and laboratory projects. This is an introductory course designed to expose students to different scientific disciplines within the context of environmental health. ENV 233 may not be taken for credit after ENV 232.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 235 The Ocean Environment
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Backus

Covering 71% of the surface, yet mostly unexplored, the Earth's oceans are a source of food, hurricanes, used as a wastebasket by human kind, and a great unknown in our climate future. This introductory course covers the formation of ocean basins; the composition and origin of seawater; currents, tides, and waves; the ocean-atmosphere connection; coastal processes; the deep-sea environment; productivity and resources; marine pollution; and the influence of oceans on climate. The class will focus on how oceanic systems work with class discussions, demonstrations, and exercises providing opportunities for students to apply their knowledge and practice analytical techniques.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

ENV 240 Indian Environment and Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor

Staff

This course, offered as part of the Davidson-in-India program, is an introduction to and comparative analysis of a variety of ecosystems in south India. Topics include tropical ecosystems' structure and dynamics, past and present human interaction with the landscape, adaptations of flora and fauna, and natural history, life history and human interactions and influences.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Natural Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies natural science without a lab distribution requirement

ENV 250 Human Geography Theory and Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

The core of geographic thought is a spatial understanding of nature-society interactions, and knowledge and theoretically informed practice that synthesizes across nature/society divides. The first part of this course explores major thinkers and key theoretical developments in the field of human geography, tracing the evolution of the discipline from its origins in classical thought to contemporary cutting edge theoretical discourses. This course explores geographic thought, various ways to ask geographic research questions, and appropriate methodologies to collect, analyze, and represent geographic data, through both quantitative and qualitative traditions. By exploring both theoretical underpinnings and current methodologies, this course provides insights into a profound discipline concerned with the myriad relationships between people and nature.

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Social-Scientific distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Social Science distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Social Sciences Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

Not offered in 2016-2017.

ENV 281 Contemporary Southern Literature (=ENG 281)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangrum

A survey of literature from the Contemporary South, with particular attention to the ecological challenges and tumultuous environmental history of the region.  Familiarity with Southern literature is not a requirement.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
During 2016-2017, satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 283 Global Food Systems
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

Creating a sustainable world food system requires that we address both food security and sustainable food production in tandem, a clear case of intersecting challenges or "wicked" problems. Wicked problems are those issues that have so many relationships of causality and correlation that researchers and policy-makers sometimes do not know where to begin to address them. In this course, we will begin to investigate some of the ways we can understand and address the challenges of producing and provisioning food using the lens of sustainability.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 290 Deserts
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Johnson, Merrill

Deserts are among the most hostile environments on earth for the survival of humans, yet their allure has resulted in profound impacts on civilizations. Religions view deserts paradoxically as places of isolation and of deep spiritual connection. Artists and writers exploit these sparse landscapes of seemingly infinite vistas to highlight the singular aesthetics of this (allegedly) empty wilderness.  Geologists have long asserted that deserts are so unique that they require their own set of processes to explain the landforms. Climatologists realize that deserts are not local phenomena, but rather are globally forced features based on worldwide circulation and heating patterns.  In this transdisciplinary and team-taught course, students will learn about deserts from multiple perspectives and through approaches both humanistic and scientific. 

 

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science or Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major and interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.

ENV 295 Independent Study
Prerequisites & Notes

Staff

Under the direction of an ENV Core faculty member, the student learns environmental studies material through a structure that primarily resembles a typical course or through independent research at an introductory level.

ENV 303 Research Seminar in Food and Agriculture Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

In this course, you will gain hands-on experience conducting social science research in the discipline of food and agriculture studies. Our research site is The Farm at Davidson College. Our goal is to design and implement a group study that measures the Farm holistically along the three dimensions of sustainability: environmental, economic and social sustainability. As a student in this class, you will be held to high expectations. Not only will you be responsible for reading assigned materials, you will be expected to conduct yourself as a professional scholar responsible for developing research questions, collecting, analyzing, storing and presenting data in an ethical, confidential and transparent manner. Our course will culminate in a presentation of our findings to the Davidson College community. Students in this course are expected to already have a working knowledge of the Farm at Davidson College. Please contact the instructor if you would like to enroll in the course and need extra material to familiarize yourself with the Farm.

Satisfies a requirement in the social science track in the Environmental Studies major.
Satisfies the social science breath course in the Environmental Studies Interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 315 Analytical Chemistry I (= CHE 220)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Blauch, Hauser

Topics in chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, chromatography, and nuclear chemistry, with applications in biological, environmental, forensic, archaeological, and consumer chemistry. Laboratory experiments include qualitative and quantitative analyses using volumetric, electrochemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic methods.


Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 330 Surface Geology and Landforms
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 120 or ENV 201 or instructor permission.

Instructor
Johnson

A detailed survey of processes in surface geology including weathering, soils, landslides, stream systems, glaciers, and climate as well as differences between these processes in various environments.  The class will split time between learning and discussion of geomorphic principles and practicing them in the field.  The class will be roughly based around the collection of new field data for an overarching class project.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in the Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 335 Soil Science
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 120 or ENV 201 or instructor permission.

Instructor
Johnson

Understanding geologic landscapes and surficial processes requires a multidisciplinary understanding of soils.  This course will examine soils with a focus on soil-forming processes and morphology.  In the classroom, students will learn the terminology and concepts of soil genesis, soil taxonomy, and soil morphology.  These concepts will then be applied in the field so that students can learn to identify and interpret horizonation and morphological characteristics. 

Students entering before 2012:  satisfies Natural Science distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in the Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Archaeology interdisciplinary minor requirements.

ENV 356 Diversity & Extinction Analysis (= BIO 356)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
K. Smith

This group investigation course focuses on the analysis of patterns of biodiversity and biodiversity loss. Students conduct literature reviews to compile data on biodiversity and/or extinction events to identify patterns of biodiversity, biodiversity function, and extinctions, with the goal of understanding the causes and consequences of biodiversity variation and loss. An emphasis is placed on the analysis of biodiversity data and the development of novel analyses to address issues such as sampling effects, extinction bias, random extinction, and emergent properties of biodiversity. The course culminates with a group project that addresses student-driven questions via the application of analyses developed during the semester.

Prerequisites & Notes
Successful completion of BIO 112/114 and BIO 227 or 321 is required.  Completion of BIO 240 is recommended.

ENV 366 Renew Natural Resources: Science and Policy (= BIO 366, ANT 382)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Lozada, Paradise

This interdisciplinary seminar course focuses on developing a scientific understanding of renewable natural resources such as fisheries and forests and how resources are then used, overused, managed, and conserved by humans.  The course primarily consider smodern methods of resource management, including adaptive and ecosystem-based management.  The course builds upon knowledge gained in the foundation courses of Anthropology, Biology, or Environmental Studies.  It addresses natural resource and environmental issues from ecosystem and policy perspectives.  Through case studies, readings, class discussions, and knowledge construction, students gain deep knowledge of ecosystem ecology and management policies and approaches.  Students then apply their knowledge to identify management principles that are consistent with a more holistic ecosystem approach and develop a case study of one natural resource and how it is managed.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural or Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor or the breadth requirement of the Humanities track.

ENV 367 Ecotoxicology (= BIO 367)
Prerequisites & Notes

BIO 111 and 112 (or 113 and 114) or ENV 201 required and permission of the instructor required; CHE 115 recommended.

Instructor
Paradise

Ecotoxicology is the science that examines the fate and effects of toxicants in and on ecological systems.  While toxicology examines effects at molecular, cell, and organism levels, effects at higher levels are not always predictable based on findings at lower levels. Ecotoxicology integrates effects at multiple levels of biological organization.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

ENV 395 Independent Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Under the direction of an ENV Core faculty member, the student engages in independent research at an advanced level.

ENV 495 Independent Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Under the direction of an ENV Core faculty member, the student engages in independent research at a very advanced level.

ENV 497 Honors Research
Prerequisites & Notes

Under the direction of an ENV Core faculty member, the student engages in research as part of pursuing Honors in Environmental Studies.

ENV 498 Environmental Studies Capstone I
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 201, ENV 202, ENV 203. Offered in the Fall. 

Instructors
Hauser and Merrill

In collaboration with their capstone mentor, students will formally propose and carry out a project based on fieldwork and/or substantive library research in the area of the student's depth component track - Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Humanities, or self-designed.  Projects will demonstrate an integration of the methods and theory appropriate to the student's depth component by investigating a question or problem that is significant, situated, and original in its application within the context of Environmental Studies.

Satisfies major requirement in Environmental Studies.

ENV 499 Environmental Studies Capstone II
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 498. Offered in the Spring.

Instructors
Hauser and Merrill

The goal of this course is to integrate the depth and breadth components of the Environmental Studies major as a complement to Capstone I.  The students will integrate information, concepts and methods learned in their previous courses to explore an environmental theme through an interdisciplinary lens, over a range of geographical scales and accounting for a variety of perspectives.

Satisfies major requirement in Environmental Studies.
 

HHV 232 Introduction to Environmental Health with Community-Based Learning (=ENV 232)
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 232 may not be taken for credit after ENV 233.

Instructors
Staff

Students will apply biological, chemical and epidemiological content to environmental health case studies and community-based learning projects. This is an introductory course designed to expose students to different scientific disciplines within the context of environmental health.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor. 
Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
 

HHV 233 Introduction to Environmental Health with Laboratory-Based Learning (= ENV 233)
Prerequisites & Notes

ENV 233 may not be taken for credit after ENV 232.

Instructors
Staff

Students will apply biological, chemical and epidemiological content to environmental health case studies and laboratory projects. This is an introductory course designed to expose students to different scientific disciplines within the context of environmental health.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values.

Satisfies the Natural Science distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

HHV 234 Genes, Environment and Health
Prerequisites & Notes

Bio 111/113 is a prerequisite for this course as it builds on content covered in Bio 111/113.

Instructor
Mamoon

This course introduces students to the role of epigenetic changes - mechanisms that regulate gene expression by altering chromatin structure and function in the absence of changes in DNA base sequence - in mediating the long-term effects of early life environment and variations in social experience across the life span on human health.

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Health and Human Values. Satisfies an interdisciplinary major requirement in Public Health.

HIS 244 Settlement of the American West, 1800-1900
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

An examination of three controversial issues connected with the settlement of the American West-gender, race, and environment. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in the humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

HIS 365 Environmental History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

This course covers environmental interactions large and small, tracing the changing ways that Americans have shaped and thought about the places where they live and work. Course focuses on US environmental history from the colonial period to the present, including national parks, preservation, conservation, and wilderness; the relationship between the US and the rest of the world; and debates over what nature is, who it is for, and how it should be used.

Satisfies a major requirement in Environmental Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in History

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Environmental Studies

Satisfies the Historical Thought distribution requirement

HIS 369 Urban Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Weimers

Examines urban life in Africa from early origins to the present. Uses a variety of sources, including material and visual culture, to understand the changing ways that urban dwellers, rural migrants, and a state governments came to see and encounter cities.

Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies a Historical Thought distribution requirement.

PHI 140 Environmental Ethics
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offerred in 2016-17)

Instructor
McKeever

Introduction to ethical analysis of environmental values and decision-making. Likely topics include (1) the value of different aspects of the environment including non-human animals, species, non-living natural objects, and ecosystems; (2) ethical analysis of different approaches to risk as this bears on environmental policy-making; (3) the moral merits and liabilities of ethical institutions, such as private property rights, as applied to the natural environment.
 

Counts as an elective for the Philosophy major and minor.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

PHY 103 Physics of the Environment
Prerequisites & Notes

Designed for non-science majors. (Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Cain

A study of the physical laws and processes that underlie environmental phenomena with a special focus on energy. Technical, economic and social consequences of these laws and processes will be examined to better delineate the complex decisions related to environmental issues.  No laboratory. 

Satisfies the Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Natural Science Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

POL 228 US Environmental Politics and Policy
Prerequisites & Notes

Offered every other year, in rotation with POL 398.

Instructor
Bullock

This course will explore the political challenges and opportunities associated with environmental problems in the United States. Through in-depth cases and role-playing simulations at the local, state, and national levels, students study the competing interests, values, narratives, and knowledge claims in the politics of energy, pollution, natural resources, biodiversity, and climate change.

Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

 

POL 328 Politics of Information
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bullock

Ratings, rankings and certifications have become a ubiquitous form of power in American society.  Through in-depth case studies, this course explores the validity, credibility and effectiveness of these hotly-contested "information-based governance" strategies (such as food sustainability certifications, corporate "green" rankings, or doctor quality ratings), particularly in the health and environmental fields.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

 

POL 398 Global Environmental Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Offered every other year, in rotation with POL 228.

Instructor
Bullock

Through in-depth case studies and research projects, this course introduces students to comparative and international perspectives on three major environmental challenges - climate change, biodiversity loss, and access to clean water.  Students will learn about the strengths and limitations of efforts by both governmental and non-governmental actors across a range of different countries and scales to tackle these challenges. 

Satisfies a major requirement in Political Science

Satisfies a major requirement in Environmental Studies

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement

POL 400 Seminars in Political Theory, POL 400-419
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor. Individual courses may have additional prerequisites. At least one seminar is offered in each sub-field every year.

Instructors
Ahrensdorf, Shaw

Reading, research, reports, and discussions on selected topics within the sub-field. Past seminars include "Lincoln and the Crisis of American Democracy," "The City and Justice," "Kant," and "Politics and Heroism."

A list of available seminars will be posted on the department webpage prior to each semester's registration.

POL 472 Citizens vs. Consumers
Prerequisites & Notes

Offered every other year, in rotation with POL 471.
Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor
Bullock

This seminar investigates the roles of citizens and consumers in politics and society.  Students compare different forms of citizenship, discuss the implications of political consumerism, and examine the tensions and complementarities between our identities as citizens and consumers in the context of different environmental arenas, including water pollution, air quality, and climate change. 


Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in Social Science track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

REL 247 Food in Religious Perspective
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Poland

Examines food practices in various religious traditions; explores contemporary ethical dilemmas concerning what we eat.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

REL 248 Christianity and Nature
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Poland

An exploration of Christian attitudes toward nature and toward non-human animals as displayed in scripture and tradition.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

REL 250 Issues in Theological Ethics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Lustig

A focused study of a given ethical issue and its theological significance. Topics to be studied may include medical ethics, justice and poverty, war and peace, the meaning of virtue and civil rights.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
ENV credit varies year by year, so please check with the ENV Chair if you have a question.  For students enrolled in 2016-2017, satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

REL 358 Humans and Other Animals
Prerequisites & Notes

Students at all levels are welcome.

 

Instructor
Poland

This is an interdisciplinary Religion course in a growing subfield, Critical Animal Studies. Readings include reflections on human nature and on human and non-human animal relations by novelists, theologians, philosophers and scholars of religion.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth and breadth course requirement in the Humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.