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Gender and Sexuality Studies Courses

General Course Listings

Sub CRSE Title
AFR 300 Afro-Cuban Feminisms (=LAS 300)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

Black and mulata women have participated in constructing Cubanidad (Cuban nationalism) since the beginning of the Cuban republic in 1902. However, the largely male-dominated national narrative that has made Che Guevara's "New Man" famous since 1959 frequently overshadows their interventions. Despite this public silence, Afro-Cubanas (Afro-Cuban women) have consistently challenged narratives of exclusion and contributed to antiracist and antisexist movements in Cuba. As theater critic, Inés María Martiatu Terry explained in 2011 one of the goals of the Afrocubanas movement is to "feminize negritude and to blacken feminism."  

This course will analyze Afro-Cubana feminisms through a close reading of the work of four key black and mulata intellectuals and activists-Sara Gómez, Nancy Morejón, Daisy Rubiera, and Gloria Rolando. In doing so, it seeks to trace the legacy of the many black and mulata women who participated in revolutionary Cuba from the 1960s to the present. In particular, the course will examine how Afro-Cubanas have challenged negative stereotypes about black women, worked both inside and outside of Cuba's state-sponsored women's movement, and fought to create space for racial and sexual rights. All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies.
Satisfies the Histories and Genealogies major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.

ANT 219 Reproduction and Childrearing: Biology and Culture
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017)

An overview of the anthropology of pregnancy, childbirth, and childrearing. Topics addressed include fertility and infertility (female and male), maternal and child healthcare systems, infant feeding, and motherhood, fatherhood, and childhood in cross-cultural and historical perspective. ​

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies a distribution requirement in Social-Scientific Thought

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

Meets the cultural diversity graduation requirement

ANT 319 Contradictions in Contemporary Motherhood: Culture, Biomedicine, Political Economy
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor
Ruhlen

Contemporary mothering happens at the crossroads of conflicting forces and discourses. This seminar frames motherhood as a window on women's changing rights and status, and as a fruitful topic for feminist theorizing. Readings will situate the topic in its historical, rhetorical, and cross-cultural contexts and will also explore the globalized networks of migration that increasingly affect motherhood.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ANT 343 Feminist Anthropology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Bowles

Explores how gender ideologies shape the exercise of power upon men and women in different societies and cultures. Topics include the construction of masculinity and femininity, commodification and consumption of gender, social position, agency, and the political economy of gender. Emphasis on developing an understanding of different theoretical perspectives in the cross-cultural study of gender.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Anthropology.

Satisfies a major & minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

ANT 371 Ethnographic Writing and Research
Prerequisites & Notes

ANT 101 or permission of the instructor. (Spring)

Instructor
Samson

Approaches to ethnographic and ethnohistorical research and analysis in cultural anthropology. Examination of selected studies that demonstrate a variety of approaches to the study of single cultures and to cross-cultural comparisons. Students design and complete research projects. With advance departmental approval, an off-campus ethnographic field school course may be substituted for credit toward the major.

One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

ANT 372 Visualizing Anthropology
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Lozada

Introduction to the theories and methods necessary for making ethnographic films. Students will conduct fieldwork and make a documentary film on a particular aspect of social and cultural behavior. Emphasis is placed on developing the critical skills needed for resolving some of the ethical, technical, and aesthetic problems that may emerge during the documentation of social and cultural behavior.

One of the courses satisfying the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.

ANT 377 Imaging the Earth
Prerequisites & Notes

(Offered in alternating years.)

Instructor
Ringle

The use of geographical information systems (GIS) to analyze, model, and present spatial relationships in the biological and social sciences, supplemented by other packages such as Google Earth. Field collection of spatial data with GPS units. Course is computer-based and emphasizes individual research projects.

Satisfies the Methods requirement for the major and minor in Anthropology.
Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

ANT 386 Seminars in Anthropology: Feminist Anthropology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Feminist Anthropology

Satisfies a major or minor requirement in Anthropology.
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major or minor.
 

ARB 250 Gender and Sexuality in the Middle East
Prerequisites & Notes

(Spring)

Instructor

Joubin

The objective of the course is to attain an interdisciplinary approach to the study of gender and sexuality in the Middle East. During the past few decades Middle East Gender studies has expanded rapidly, and this course will introduce students to the milestone monographs that established the field. From a focus on women as a category of analysis, to gender and masculinity studies, the field has expanded rapidly. This course examines gender as a category of analysis and focuses on productions of knowledge of sexual difference in Middle East society. We will examine the implication of modernity on men and women in the Middle East, following scholarship that does not adhere to the tradition versus modernity dichotomy, and we will pay particular attention to studies that examine the ambiguity of modernity. The intersection of nationalist and gendered discourse is among the themes this course will focus on. This course is conducted in English.

Satisfies a major requirement in Center for Interdisciplinary Studies major in Arab Studies and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Arab Studies and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in International Studies and in Middle East Studies.

ARB 340 Gender and Politics in Contemporary Syrian Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

Arabic 202 or permission of instructor.

Instructor
Joubin

This course will focus on the intersection of gender and politics in contemporary Syrian literature. Through an examination of the novels, short stories, autobiography, and poems of writers such as Hana Mina, Khayri al-Dhabhabi, Asima Darwish, Muhammad al-Maghut, and Khalid Khalifeh, students will be introduced to debates on the direction of society and politics in contemporary literature. Students will also be exposed to films and mini-series based on the literature and lives of several of the writers we will be studying. The goal of the course is for students to learn to comfortably read contemporary Syrian literature, and acquire the vocabulary necessary to discuss the key issues and themes relating to gender and politics. This course is taught entirely in Arabic.

Satisfies a minor requirement in Arabic.
Satisfies a major requirement in Gender Studies.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Counts toward the Asian Studies interdisciplinary minor, the Middle East Studies interdisciplinary minor, the International Studies interdisciplinary minor (Middle East sections), and Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric distribution requirements.
 

ARB 341 Gender Studies in the Arab World
Prerequisites & Notes

Arabic 202 or permission of instructor.

Instructor
Botros

The target of this course is to provide an overview of the key topics in the study of gender in the Arab world. This course provides a gendered understanding of prevailing ideologies, social practices, and trends for students interested in Arab politics and culture. Students will be presented with readings ranging from history, sociology, anthropology, political science, and media studies. The course is taught entirely in Arabic.

Satisfies a minor requirement in Arab Studies.
Satisfies a major requirement in Gender Studies.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Counts toward the Asian Studies interdisciplinary minor, the Middle East Studies interdisciplinary minor, the International Studies interdisciplinary minor (Middle East sections), and the Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric distribution requirements.
 

ART 222 Painted Women, Women Painting
Prerequisites & Notes

(Fall)

Instructor
Serebrennikov

As a survey of gender in art, this course's first half examines how women have been represented in Western art and what that implies about the balance of power between the genders over the centuries. The second half of the course deals with the gradual growth of art made by women, the issues addressed by that art, and its reception in American culture of the past century.

Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

BIO 233 Behavioral Ecology
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 112/114 is required.  Not open to students with credit for BIO 223.

Instructor 
Stanback 

Behavioral ecology represents the intersection of Animal Behavior, Evolutionary Biology, and Ecology.  Behavioral ecologists are particularly interested in the fitness consequences (the adaptive significance) of the behavior of animals.  In this course, we will investigate foraging behavior, anti-predator behavior, territorial behavior, conflict, sexual selection, mating systems, parental care, and social systems.

BIO 360 Biology of HIV/AIDS
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 201, 202, or 208/238 and permission of the instructor are required.

Instructor
Wessner

In this upper-level seminar course, students read and discuss primary journal articles related to HIV/AIDS in a chronological fashion, beginning with the first scientific reports of HIV/AIDS from 1981 and progressing through the most recent articles.  Through this in-depth analysis of the scientific literature, students see how current advances in the field are predicated on earlier knowledge and begin to learn how technological advancements have led to new scientific knowledge. Throughout the semester, students also examine popular press accounts of major scientific advancements and investigate the role of reportage in this pandemic.
 

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

BIO 362 Issues in Reproductive Medicine
Prerequisites & Notes

Successful completion of BIO 111/113 and 112/114 or permission of instructor are required.

Instructor
Case

Advances in medical science give us an ever-increasing mastery of our "natural" reproductive processes.  Technologies for controlling our fertility, diagnosing and treating the fetus, and allowing premature neonates to complete their development ex-utero challenge our traditional ideas of parenthood, family, and even personal identity.  This seminar course addresses a myriad of economic, sociocultural, ethical, and legal questions by the new reproductive technologies.  The course is discussion-based, includes a semester-long project, and involves technology applications.

CHI 207 Engendering Chinese Cinema
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English. (Not offered every year.)

Instructor
Shen

Course examines gender relations in 20th-century China through cinematic representations. By looking in detail at the films of a few key directors and reading scholarly works, the class discusses the changing social and political positions of women in cinema from the 1920s to the 1990s, and how this change affects gender relations.

Satisfies a Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

CHI 226 In the Name of Religion: Love and Gender in Chinese Fiction and Film
Prerequisites & Notes

Taught in English.

Instructor
Shao

This course will focus on love, gender roles, and sexuality in the religious contexts:  how they are conceived of according to Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, and how they play out separately, as well as against each other.  The course will examine two distinct but closely related literary traditions.  One is literature in religion: it is a popular practice with both Buddhism and Daoism to employ literature as a vehicle for their ideologies.  The other is religion in literature: a popular literary tradition that habitually exploits religious themes and motifs for entertainment.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies Literature distribution requirement.

COM 218 Gendered Communication in Society (= SOC 218)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

Examination of the social construction of gender in both personal relationships and professional contexts. Areas to be explored may include culture, verbal and nonverbal communication, family dynamics and close relationships, education, organizational communication, and roles in media.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in Gender & Sexuality Studies and Communication Studies interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

DAN 282 Dance, Gender, & Sexuality
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Bory

Through a transhistorical study of a various styles and forms, this lecture/discussion class examines a variety of issues around gender and sexuality illuminated in the staging, performance, and practice of dance. Understanding dance as a focused site for conceptualizing how bodies make meaning, this course explores the social and historical configuration of dancing bodies and dance's capacity to form and transform social identities. Course work includes readings, performance viewings, presentations, and written assignments.

Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
Satisfies a major requirement in Gender & Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender & Sexuality Studies.
 

DIG 340 Gender and Technology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Sample

This class explores the relationship between gender and technology in the digital age. We will consider the countless ways modern technology shapes our attitudes toward and experiences of sex, power, play, and work, and even the way digital technology shapes our bodies. Other topics will include the representation of gender in digital media, feminism and protest in digital spaces, queer gaming, and gender performance through social media.

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ECO 105 Statistics and Basic Econometrics
Prerequisites & Notes

(Beginning Spring 2018)  Economics 101 or permission of the instructor.

 

Instructor
Staff

Application of probability and statistics to economic analysis. Topics include: probability rules, discrete and continuous random variables, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, correlation, and regression. Spreadsheet software is utilized. An economics research paper is a major component of the course.

One laboratory session per week.

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement. 
Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

ECO 205 Econometrics
Prerequisites & Notes

Economics 101 and either Economics 105 or permission of the instructor. 
One laboratory session per week.

Instructor
Staff

Applications of linear regression analysis to economic analysis. Topics include model specification, parameter estimation, inference, and problems relating to data issues, statistical concerns, and model diagnostics. Statistical software is utilized. An economics research paper is a major component of the course.

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement. 

EDU 260 Oppression & Education (=SOC 260)
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students with credit for EDU 210 or EDU 250.

Instructor
Kelly

This course examines various manifestations of oppression in the United States and the questions they raise about inequality and social justice within educational institutions.  We will apply methods of critical analysis drawn from anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and psychology to an examination of social issues in the United States educational system.  We will examine education as a central site of conflict over the gap between the United States' egalitarian mission and its unequal structure, processes, and outcomes.  Students will rethink contemporary solutions to social diversity in education, develop a social justice framework which emphasizes inequality, and design an institutional ethnographic project as a critical intervention in schools and society.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
 

ENG 110 Course list for Introduction to Literature
Prerequisites & Notes

English 110 satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Check schedule to determine which course is being offered.

FALL 2017

ENG 110 Growing Up in America
Instructor

S. Campbell

In this course, we will consider young adult fiction both from various critical perspectives and within various readerly contexts.  Over the semester, we will:

  • Review a brief history of the genre from 1860 to 2000;
  • Explore shifting perceptions of gender, sexuality, and coming of age in the United States;
  • Discuss in what ways ethnicity, race, and socioeconomic status impact expectations about maturation;
  • Consider how reviews of and responses to young adult texts reflect contemporaneous assumptions about the purposes of literature.

Satisfies an elective requirement in the English major.
Provides elective credit in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

 

SPRING 2018

ENG 110  Literature & Medicine
Instructor
Vaz

Science and medicine have indelibly influenced how we understand and respond to the physical and mental state of being human.  We will consider how an appreciation of literary texts and the questions they broach give us a different insight into the human condition and affect our awareness of health, addiction, illness, disease, suffering, recovery, and death.  In doing so, we will also pay close attention to the cultural coding of these issues, as we examine how gender, class, race, sexual orientation, or other cultural biases color our perceptions of health, disease, suffering and death.

Counts for the Health and Human Values Interdisciplinary Minor

 

OTHER TOPICS (not offered in current academic year):

ENG 110 Shakespeare & Sports
Instructor
Lewis

Contemporary sports and Elizabethan theater have much in common. Both present spectacles, before a rowdy audience, in an arena. Both involve rehersal and scripted performance. Both require guides, whether a director or a coach. Both create rivalry, whether between teams or acting companies. Most important, both center on stories that thrive on the essential, exhilarating, and painful human experience. Like Shakespeare's plays, sports history yields instances of extraordinary heroism and of heart-breaking mistakes. Real athletes find reflection in many of Shakespeare's best known characters. Take, for instance, Dale Earrnhardt, Jr., whose larger-than-life father haunts him as King Hamlet's ghost haunts his son. Andre Agassi's second chance at tennis recalls The Tempest's Prospero, who is exiled from and returns to dominate another court. This class explores how such moments and people in sports find reflection in Shakespeare's works.

ENG 110 Introduction to Environmental Literature (=ENV 210)
Instructor

Staff

(Cross-listed as Environmental Studies 210.)  An introduction to global environmental literature.  We'll focus primarily on short fiction, novels, and non-fiction prose.  The course will introduce students to environmental justice issues as well as contemporary trends in global literature.  Literary and environmental topics include toxicity, waste, food, inequality, the idea of "wilderness," and activism.  No prior experience studying literature is required.

Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in Humanities Track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor

ENG110 - Graphic Medicine:  Drawing Disability
Instructor

Fox

Why is the graphic novel literary? And why has it become an immensely popular site for the representation of illness, disability, and medicine?  In this Introduction to Literature class, we'll start with the premise that the unique intersection of word, color, image, text, and juxtaposition offered by the graphic novel offers authors singular opportunities for storytelling. We will further ask: what do comics, zines, and graphic novels have to teach us about our varied kinds of embodiment, particularly about disabled bodies? We will consider how these visual texts teach us about how bodies engage with the social and medical contexts surrounding them. Encompassing everything from bipolar disorder to cancer, depression to HIV/AIDS, epilepsy to deafness, and end-of-life issues to amputation, possible course works may include Epileptic, Cancer Vixen, Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, and Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michaelangelo, and Me. 

Counts as an Innovation Course for the major.
Counts for the Health and Human Values Interdisciplinary Minor

ENG110 - Introduction to Comedy
Instructor

Ingram

This course offers an overview of the comic tradition in English, from the Middle Ages to the present, from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to Arrested Development.  Although humor will be a recurring feature of some texts and of most class meetings, this course traces how comedies respond to inescapable challenges of human life:  social and political structures as apparent obstacles to the desires of individuals; the body and its failings, to the point of death; art, particularly comedy, as a reassuring (or maybe deceptive) refuge of happy endings that can seem elusive in life.  Different eras respond differently to those challenges, so the course offers a broad survey of literary and cultural history.  Over the semester, students and professor alike will look for comedy in surprising places, including in the form of the course itself, certain to end happily, before it has even begun.


ENG 110 - Media & Community
Instructor
Churchill
 
From Walt Whitman's broad embrace of American readers in the 1860s to the digital social networks of today, this course examines how various media form communities of readers and writers. We will investigate how lyric poetry creates one kind of intimacy between author and reader, how blogs establish another, and how the NBC television comedy Community builds its own cult following. Davidson College meets Greendale Community College in a course that teaches you how to read, analyze, and respond critically and creatively to various forms of media. 

ENG 220 Literary Analysis
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor 
Staff

Designed for potential majors. Emphasizes theoretical approaches and critical strategies for the written analysis of poetry, fiction, and drama and/or film. Writing intensive. Required for the major.  Students who major in English should complete 220 by the end of the sophomore year. Those who do not meet this deadline must make special arrangements with the Chair.

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 242 Women's Work: 21st Century Female Playwrights (=THE 242)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
S. Green

This course provides a close look at work created for the stage by women since 2000.  The analysis of plays written and produced in the 21st century will be set in the context of feminist and queer theory which has offered insights into the cultural function of "tomen's work."

Satisfies a requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Theatre major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Literary & Cultural Representations Track of the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.

ENG 271 Disability in Literature and Art
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fox

In this course, we will explore disability as it is depicted in literary and cultural texts, from the canon to disability culture.  These representations are sometimes used metaphorically, as representations of extreme innocence or evil.  Likewise, they might reduce the experience of the disability to a conquerable challenge, or to a fate worse than death.  We will reconsider disability history, question socially defined categories of normalcy and ability, and learn about the presence of disability culture.  Rather than trying to catalogue all the examples of disability in literature, this course seeks to use disability studies as a genesis point and theoretical framework through which to examine several core questions about disability, literature, and the problems and opportunities arising from the intersection of the two.  We will reconsider representations of disability in literature; examine how disability is a culturally constructed category like race, gender, class, and sexuality (and how it intersects with those); study contemporary writing, performance, and art from disability culture; and consider how disability aesthetics can meaningfully contribute to the processes and products of artistic creation.  This course presumes no prior coursework in English and welcomes those from across the disciplines interested in studying the social and cultural experience of disability as a way to inform their own work in the arts and sciences.

Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirements.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

 

ENG 288 Contemporary American Multicultural Drama
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fox

  • What does it mean to use the stage to give voice to being part of a multicultural community?
  • How does theater help fight stereotypes and oppression?
  • In what ways do plays rewrite history and create pride?
  • What does it mean to stage the multicultural experience in a globalized world?
  • How does theater show us the intersections of different kinds of identity?

This course will answer these questions and more through our study of twentieth- and twenty-first century drama from several rich traditions of multicultural playwriting in America. Communities represented will include African-Americans, Asian Americans, disabled Americans, Latino/a Americans and LGBTQ Americans. We will explore issues raised in their plays including identity, the American Dream, stereotypes, history, and hope. No prior experience reading drama is necessary.

Satisfies the Cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ENG 294 Harlem Renaissance
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Churchill

Read major texts of the Harlem Renaissance and explore issues of race, gender, sexuality, migration, & diaspora that shaped this formative moment in twentieth century literature. We will read poetry, fiction, essays, and plays by W. E. B. DuBois, Countee Cullen, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, Claude McKay, and others, situating their work in the context of developments in modern art, music, sociology, psychology, and print culture.

Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Area: North America).
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdiscplinary minor.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

ENG 295 Women Writers
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fackler, Staff

This course prowls the house of fiction's dangerous and often forbidden spaces employing the visions and voices of transgressive agents, who go places they should not, wrestle monsters literal and figurative, and rescue bodies (of information and imagination) essential to us all. Readings: selected 19th, 20th, and 21st century fiction by women, from A Room of One's Own, to In the Cut, to Swamplandia, and lots of great works in between.   

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement of the English major.

ENG 363 History of the Novel
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Fackler

The origins of the novel in Britain and the circumstances, both historical and sociological, surrounding its emergence. 

 

Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

ENG 373 "Terrible Beauty": Yeats and Modern Poetry
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Churchill


This course in modern poetry explores the ways in which a genre celebrates for communicating truth and beauty also conveys a great deal of terror and ugliness--often in striking, disturbing combinations. In honor of the centennial of the Easter Rising of 1916, which aimed to end British rule in Ireland, the course will begin with an in-depth study of W.B. Yeats, followed by readings of British, Irish, and transnational poets Mina Loy, W. H. Auden, Philip Larkin, Stevie Smith, Seamus Heaney, Linton Kwesi Johnson, and Carol Ann Duffy.

Satisfies the Literary, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

ENG 388 Contemporary Theatre
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

388 Contemporary Theatre

Instructor
Fox

Despite our highly visual and multimedia age, we don't often think of the stage as being a site of significant cultural conversation. Yest there is simply no substitute for the vitality and importance of live theater. To paraphrase Edward Albee, theater puts the mirror up infront of an audience and asks them: "This is who you are. Now what are you going to do about it?"

This course will examine the origins and development of contemporary theater in the Western tradition, post-1960, with an emphasis on American and British drama. We will particularly place heavy emphasis on text-based drama of the last two decades, examining the ways in which recent theater has asked its audiences to contemplate issues of concern to contemporary life including (though not limited to) race in America; global violence against women; class division; and the commodification of human relations, both personal and international. We will also discuss how theater challenges us to find creative solutions through connection, community, and claiming identity. No prior experience reading drama is necessary.

In the past, this course has included works by (but is not limited to): August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, Quiara Algería Hudes, Lynn Nottage, Brandon Jacobs-Jenkins, Robert O'Hara, Adrienne Kennedy, Amiri Baraka, Jez Butterworth, Tony Kushner, and Ayad Akhtar.

Satisfies the Literacy, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

ENG 391 Literary Criticism
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

 

Instructor 
Kuzmanovich

Analytic and comparative reading of major critical texts.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Diversity requirement in the English major.

ENG 394 Studies in Modern Literature: The Avant-Garde (Fall 2017)
Prerequisites & Notes

First-year students require permission of the instructor.

Instructor
Churchill

A course concerned with avant-garde schools, movements and strategies, "The Avant-Garde" will include exploration of different genres, media, and cultures, and investigate relationships between avant-garde practice and theory, artistic innovation and social change, and forms, platforms, and politics. Because of its focus on challenging the white, male domination of the avant-garde with attention to women, queer, and minority poets from modernism to the present day, this course meets the diversity requirement for the English major and qualifies for GSS credit.

Fulfills the Diversity requirement of the English major.
Counts towards the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor (Literary and Cultural Representations track).
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
 

 

 

ENG 409 Television: Queer Representations (=GSS 401)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fackler

With its roots in the gendered domestic suburban household, television has a longstanding investment in questions of gender and sexuality.  Pushing back against the assumption that LGBTQ characters did not appear on our screens in a sustained way until the 1980s, this course will investigate how TV representation of queer life have changed with the evolution of the medium since the 1950s.  Recent work in the field of queer TV studies has unearthed queer characters from previously invisible archives, charged changing conceptions of masculinity and femininity in broadcast programming, and documented the organizational strategies  employed by television narrative that disclose and contain expressions of non-normative sexualities.  We will seek to understand the dynamics of visibility and invisibility that structure representations of televised queerness.

Fulfills the Diversity requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.

ENG 472 Seminar A: Gossip or B: Twenty-First-Century British Literature or C: Joyce/Nabokov
Prerequisites & Notes

Juniors and Seniors only. 

Check the schedule to determine which section is being offered.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

472A Gossip

Instructor
Fackler

Drawing on cultural studies and performance studies, this trans-historical and transnational course investigates the role gossip plays in literature, psychoanalysis, journalism, politics, television, film, and new media. The seminar foregrounds the imbrication of gossip and scandal with constructions of gender and sexuality.

This topic counts for the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
 

472B 21st Century British Literature

Instructor
Fackler

This course considers the transformation of the book as artifact and idea since the turn of the century. We will investigate the new, often experimental, narrative forms authors have developed as a response to such twenty-first-century pressures as globalization, terrorism, and genetic engineering. Questions for the seminar include: What are the overarching concerns for fiction in the wake of the postmodern and postcolonial moment? What kind of relationship can we expect between science and literature in the 21st-century novel? Does contemporary science contribute to newly emergent structures of feeling that the novel might register? And if such structures call up concepts of the posthuman, how might they sit with the traditionally humanistic orientation of the novel as a broadly popular genre?  How does post-9/11 fiction respond to current fears of technological and/or natural annihilation? What are the factors determining pre-canonical status for the texts on this syllabus, and how can we understand the new circulation of global capital and cultural value? Students will consider the following concepts: virtual fiction; cloning, the post-human, and dystopian responses to the possibility of a genetically engineered future; alternative modes of narration; the figure of the artist manqué; ghostwriting as a narrative technique (and as a 21st-century replacement for the omniscient narrator); detective fiction; fictions of terrorism and the politics of post-9/11 vulnerability; the new Bildungsroman; the author business, and the influence of book clubs and literary prizes such as the Man Booker. 
 

472C Joyce/Nabokov

Instructor

Kuzmanovich

Why a seminar on Joyce/Nabokov?   Like most seminars, this one requires intensive attention to the themes and techniques of  major writers.  These two long dead writers consists of their still having in print almost all the books they've written,  with those books provoking over 10,000 critical pieces just since 1963.  Joyce's influence is acknowledged by Samuel Beckett, Jorge Luis Borges, Anthony Burgess, Philip K. Dick, Umberto Eco, William Faulkner, Arthur Miller, Raymond Queneau, Philip Roth, Salman Rushdie, Tom Stoppard, and Derek Walcott while Martin Amis,  John Barth, Paul Bowles, Italo Calvino, Bobby Ann Mason, James Merrill, Thomas Pynchon, W.G. Sebald, Zadie Smith, Mark Strand,  Amy Tan, and Richard Wilbur mention Nabokov's, and probably Joyce's by way of Nabokov.

Method:  We will concentrate on (1) their styles (Joyce's "High Modernist" and Nabokov's supposed "post-modernist"/"metafictional"/"intertextual" one) since the grit in these men's words has gotten under the skin of many a reader with an innovative critical approach; (2) their tendencies to generate their respective narrative authority from events in their own lives, especially their respective experiences of exile; (3) their depictions of Love in its various forms (including the loss of it); (4) the absenting presence of the big bogey, Death; and (5) the last member of that robust triumvirate, Art. 

Goals:   A foretaste of mature and thoughtful reading; confidence that you can do independent, original,  and careful scholarship on even the most challenging writing.

But is this class really for you?  If you believe that certain words or subjects should be off-limits to writers or readers, this is not the class for you.  Ulysses and Lolita each continue to sell well over 100,000 copies per year, yet they not only contain but also provoke language and situations which some students may find objectionable.  This is a class for those students who not only possess the already uncommon share of discipline, imagination, memory, and attention to details vouchsafed to most who choose Davidson, but who are also blessed with an ability to heft another's words and deliver and withstand therapeutic non-rancorous badgering especially on the topics of  suspending disbelief in the transfigurative power of art and the (ir)relevance of contemporary critical theory. 

Texts: 0-14-024774-2 Joyce,  Dubliners; 670-0 180301; Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as Young Man; 0-19-511029-3 Fargnoli: James Joyce A-Z 0-394-74312-1; Joyce: Ulysses, Gabler Edition;  0-679-72725-6 Nabokov, Gift; 1-883011-18-3 Novels and Memoirs; 1-883011-19-1 Novels 1955-1962 0-679-72997-6; Nabokov,  Stories  of Vladimir Nabokov; 052153643X; Connolly, The Cambridge Companion to Nabokov (Recommended Only); 0-679-72609-8 Nabokov: Strong Opinions (Recommended Only); 978-0-3-0-7-27189-1Nabokov, The Original of Laura (Recommended Only)

ENG 495 Seminar: Cleopatra
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to first-year students and sophomores without instructor's permission.  

Instructor
Lewis

Cleopatra is one of the most iconic women of all time.  Her personal history rivals in interest the history of her appropriation by various Western cultures in various time periods.  This course begins with her biography, which entails her very first public images, both those she herself projected and those that Augustan Romans fashioned.  When Shakespeare created his own image of her in Antony and Cleopatra by adapting and subverting the Roman Plutarch's rendition of her as the toxic seductress of Marc Antony, a second icon entered the historical panorama.  Now the English playwright was subject to adaptation and appropriation by such competitive literary figures as Restoration playwright John Dryden and, later, George Bernard Shaw.  Centuries after Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, Cleopatra herself endures as an icon who attracts icons, none more notable than the glamorous Elizabeth Taylor, whose recently re-released film portrayal of the Egyptian queen is now over fifty years old.  Throughout this course, students will explore how various iconic figures have appropriated Cleopatra- as a woman, an exotic, and a royal- for their audiences: what does a particular version of Cleopatra reveal or suggest about the historical period or social milieu in which she emerges?  What is her relationship to her appropriator?  The course ends with a contemplation of Cleopatra and Taylor as iconic complements.  Are they femmes fatales or feminists? 

Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Fulfills the Historical Approaches requirement of the English major.

FMS 220 Introduction to Film and Media Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructors
Lerner, McCarthy

An introduction to the history and analysis of screen media, with an emphasis on film (feature films, documentaries, animation, and experimental) together with an examination of ways cinematic techniques of storytelling do and do not find their ways into later media like television and video games. Lectures and discussions supplemented by theoretical readings and weekly screenings.

Satisfies the Visual and Performing Arts distribution requirement.
Required course for fulfilling the Film and Media Studies Interdisciplinary Minor.

FRE 220 Literature and Madness
Prerequisites & Notes

French 201 or above. (Spring)

Instructor
Sainte-Claire

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.
 

FRE 223 Childhood and Youth
Prerequisites & Notes

French 201 or above. (Fall)

Instructor
Slawy-Sutton

Literature treating the theme, "l'enfance et l'adolescence,'' through different genres and literary periods. Typical authors: Maupassant, Colette, Prévert, Anouilh, Sarraute, Sebbar, Chedid.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

FRE 320 Husbands, Wives, and Lovers
Prerequisites & Notes

Any course numbered French 220 or above, or permission of the instructor. (Not offered 2016-17.)

Instructor
Kruger

Study of representations of female adultery in the 19th century French novel with emphasis on the social stereotypes and cultural myths at play in French fiction. Typical authors: Flaubert, Barbey d'Aurevilly, Balzac, Sand, Maupassant, Mérimée.

Satisfies distribution requirement in Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric.

GSS 101 Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fackler, Gonzalez, Horowitz, Tilburg

This class provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the analytical tools, key scholarly debates, history, and research subfields of gender and sexuality studies. It pays particular attention to the construction and deployment of gender as a cultural category across various social institutions. Students will learn to assess and analyze documents pertaining to the history of and contemporary state of feminisms and women's rights, masculinity, queer theory, disability studies, body image and consumer culture, intersectionality, as well as a host of gendered questions related to health, work, the family, violence, and politics.

Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

GSS 201 Feminist and Queer Theories
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Tilburg, Boyer, Horowitz

This class explores the epistemological and theoretical foundations of Gender and Sexuality Studies. Students will become familiarized with the different theoretical traditions that inform contemporary gender analysis, and examine scholarly definitions of gender and sexuality. We discuss the means by which gender and sexuality are produced and reproduced at the individual and institutional levels, their intersection with other dimensions of social difference, as well as various related approaches to and interpretations of equality, justice, and freedom.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

GSS 220 Topics in Queer Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

This course provides an introduction to the field of queer studies by way of a specialized topic. Course content and emphasis will vary with instructor, but sample topics include queer theories, queer of color critiques, queer popular culture, transgender studies, and queer activism.

 

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies - content course for society and politics of trade.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies-elective.
Satisfies Liberal Studies distribution requirement

 

GSS 292 Queer Russia (=RUS 292)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Utkin

Russia is accustomed to playing the role of the "evil empire." The current ongoing war in Ukraine has resurrected the Cold War-era narratives about Russia as a dark, aggressive, and ruthless military power. The notorious legislation of recent years-whose functions range from barring Americans from adopting Russian orphans to criminalizing the so-called "gay propaganda"-have further solidified Russia's reputation as a country with little regard for human rights. Yet generations of Russian poets, artists, and writers have transformed the country's systematic oppression and violence into spectacular forms of protest and self-expression. This course focuses on gender and sexuality in exploring an alternative cultural history of Russia, which highlights its queer legacy from the nineteenth century to the present. We will examine poetry, fiction, art, memoirs, plays, films, performances, and discursive texts that showcase uniquely Russian conceptions of marriage, gender relations, gender expression, and sexual identity. Attention will be paid to the ways in which Russian and Western narratives of queerness align and diverge. In English. No knowledge of Russian is required or expected.

Satisfies major and minor requirements in Russian Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

GSS 321 Sex Outside the City
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Horowitz

Since the early 1990s, many queer theorists have reasserted the centrality of western cities to the formation of queer subjectivities. But more recent scholarship has challenged this assumption, suggesting that not only have LGBTQ identities historically developed in suburban, rural, and non-western locales, but that the dominant urban narrative reinforces white, upper-class maleness as the norm of queer life. This course examines the ways in which space is queered and queerness emerges in response to metropolitan, non-metropolitan, Western, and non-Western space. We will examine the queer convergence of the public and the private, the processes by which space is simultaneously raced and gendered, the relationship between sexuality and built environments, and the role of capitalism and neoliberalism in producing queer individuals and networks.

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies -Histories and Geneologies Track.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies - elective.
Satisfies liberal studies distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement

GSS 324 Sex, Law, Modernity (= HIS 324)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Boyer, Tilburg

This course, team-taught by a historian of European gender and a legal and literary scholar of the Hispanic world, will introduce students to the ways that early modern and modern Western societies have intervened in and defined categories of illicit sexual desire, identity, and conduct. Modern European states took an abiding interest in regulating what they considered to be disordered and deviant sexual persons- the Homosexual, the Prostitute, the Intersexed. These same states took a marked interest in enforcing public health and hygiene by way of laws targeting private sexual behavior, from birth control to interracial relationships. These interventions expressed sharp anxieties about the character of modern life: urbanization, industrialization, democratization, the rise of the middle classes, empire. The course will combine an interrogation of primary texts from the early modern and modern periods with secondary and theoretical works dealing with history, law, and sexuality.

Satisfies a major requirement in History

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.  Only counted in one track.

Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies  Only counted in one track.

Satisfies a distribution requirement in Historical Thought

GSS 340 Transnational Sexualities Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Horowitz

This course surveys a number of emerging frameworks for rethinking the concept of queerness from a transnational perspective. Our investigations will move between theory and lived experience, within and across national borders, and will challenge key Western assumptions about sexual development, freedom, identity, and citizenship. We will consider questions such as: To what extent do Western paradigms of sex, gender, and sexuality limit our understanding of non-Western sexual cultures? How does the relationship between sexual practice and sexual identity shift across cultures? How do tourists and migrants negotiate, adapt, and remake sexual discourses and economies as they move in and through new spaces? How has the legacy of colonialism shaped and been shaped by sexual practice? How is sexuality used to articulate national, racial, class, and ethnic identities?

Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

GSS 341 Trans: Bodies, Identities, Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Horowitz

Trans: Bodies, Identities, Politics

GSS 350 Sex Radicals!
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Horowitz

When we think about queer and feminist politics, we typically think of the processes by which women and LGBT people have effected change through legislation, court cases, and supporting candidates friendly to their causes. But much U.S. queer and feminist thought and activism has taken root outside the bounds of liberal electoral politics. This course centers on the fringes. It surveys the writings of less-palatable political actors: punks, anarchists, communists, anti-capitalists, sex workers, black radicals, and prison abolitionists. In exploring these political genealogies, we will ask: How does the personal constitute the political? What counts as (legitimate) political action according to whom? (How) can social change be effected outside of electoral politics and state institutions? What should be the role of the state in regulating labor and distributing rights and entitlements? What priorities have animated the various radical traditions within queer and feminist thought, and how have they addressed or failed to address race, class, ethnicity, and disability? How have these traditions intersected and diverged? Why have contemporary queer radicals come to focus on issues less obviously connected to gender and sexuality like global capitalism, drone warfare, and police militarization?

 

Satisfies a requirement for the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor. Satisfies a Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

GSS 360 Transgender Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Horowitz

A political platform, identity, field of study, and more, "transgender" holds many different meanings for different people today.  This course explores the history and present of an expansive sense of trans- transgender, transsexual, genderqueer, and more- through an array of texts, including memoir, fiction, film, television, and scholarly writings.  By thinking trans in these different contexts and through different concepts, trans studies/politics connects to queer studies, explores and challenges "umbrella"-type understandings, and critically interrogates the inheritances that shape trans activisms today.  Topics that focus our work together include histories of sexology and activisms, disability and trans politics, trans people's experiences with prisons and carceral violences, trans people's participation and representation in larger projects for racial justice, environmental justice and trans activisms, and more.

Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor (society and politics track).
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.
 

GSS 390 Sexuality and Public Discourses in the United States
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Hillard

This course examines the history of sexuality in the United States from 1642 to the present through the lens of primary documents, analyzed using rhetorical methods.

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.

GSS 401 Television: Queer Representations (=ENG 409)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Fackler

With its roots in the gendered domestic suburban household, television has a longstanding investment in questions of gender and sexuality.  Pushing back against the assumption that LGBTQ characters did not appear on our screens in a sustained way until the 1980s, this course will investigate how TV representation of queer life have changed with the evolution of the medium since the 1950s.  Recent work in the field of queer TV studies has unearthed queer characters from previously invisible archives, charged changing conceptions of masculinity and femininity in broadcast programming, and documented the organizational strategies  employed by television narrative that disclose and contain expressions of non-normative sexualities.  We will seek to understand the dynamics of visibility and invisibility that structure representations of televised queerness.

Fulfills the Diversity requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.

GSS 431 The Science of Sex
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Contemporary understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality are shaped by a long history of scientific work in fields as diverse as sexology, genetics, phrenology, eugenics, biology, and more. This course traces how these understandings shaped and were shaped by sex, gender, and sexuality. The course begins with early work in the field of feminist science studies, then turns to questions of taxonomy and difference before interrogating the role of nationalisms in sex-related sciences. The class also explores American eugenics, early work in sexology and the study of homosexuality, sex and the brain in the contemporary U.S., problems with sex differentiation, the role of sex in current ecological sciences, assisted reproductive technologies, posthuman bodies, and feminist interventions in technosciences.

 

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

GSS 440 Matters of Life and Death: Biopower, Necropolitics, Sex
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Horowitz

In this course, we will investigate how definitions of life and death have evolved over the last two centuries and how those definitions have shaped American culture and policy. We will ask who is empowered to make decisions about who lives and who dies and by what authority; what bodies are included and excluded in discussions of bio- and necropolitics; and how gender, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and religion frame and become framed by matters of life and death.

Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

GSS 498 GSS Senior Capstone
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Horowitz, Kaufman

Senior Capstone in Gender and Sexuality Studies

HIS 225 Women and Work: Gender and Society in Britain, 1700-1918
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Dietz

An examination of British women's lives and social relations with regard to production-artistic, domestic, industrial, intellectual, etc.-in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.

HIS 228 The Modern Body: Gender, Sex, and Politics in France
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Tilburg

One of the greatest "discoveries" of modern historical thought has been that even the human body has aspects that are historically contingent.  Examines the way historians of modern France tackled the history of the body. 

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Counts as an elective in the French & Francophone Studies major (prior departmental approval required).
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HIS 243 Native Women
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Stremlau

How have Indigenous, American Indian, Native American, and First Nations women constructed their identities, participated in their societies, and responded to common experiences, particularly those resulting from colonization? How did Indigenous women's ancestors live, and how have cultural traditions and identities been lost, maintained, and reconfigured over time? Through historical scholarship, films, fiction, and autobiography, the voices of Indigenous women and their allies speak eloquently about the diversity and complexity of these women's lives over time and across place.

Meets the Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HIS 244 Settlement of the American West, 1800-1900
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

An examination of three controversial issues connected with the settlement of the American West-gender, race, and environment. 

Students entering 2012 and after: satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Students entering before 2012: satisfies History distribution requirement.
Satisfies depth or breadth course requirement in the humanities track of the Environmental Studies major or interdisciplinary minor.

HIS 275 Drugs in East Asia
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

This is an introduction to the history of addiction and psychoactive substances - opium, tobacco, and alcohol - in East Asia from 1600-present. Questions involving the consumption, circulation, perception, and regulation of psychoactive substances will be discussed.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies requirement in Asian Studies, International Studies, Health and Human Values, and Neuroscience Interdisciplinary Minors.

HIS 306 Women and Gender in U.S. History to 1870
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Stremlau

The history of women in what is now the United States, beginning prior to European colonization and ending after the Civil War.  Comparison and contrast of the experiences of female people with attention to race, class, and religion in shaping women's lives, with emphasis on changing social roles, labor, and suffrage.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HIS 307 Women and Gender in U.S. History Since 1870
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Stremlau


The history of women in the United States from 1870 to the present, with emphasis on educational and work experiences, the suffrage movement and the ongoing struggle for women's equality, family and sexuality, and differences of race, class, and sexual orientation.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HIS 324 Illicit Sexualities: Sex, Law, and Modernity = GSS 324
Prerequisites & Notes

This course, team-taught by a historian of European gender and a legal and literary scholar of the Hispanic world, will introduce students to the ways that early modern and modern Western societies have intervened in and defined categories of illicit sexual desire, identity, and conduct. Modern European states took an abiding interest in regulating what they considered to be disordered and deviant sexual persons-- the Homosexual, the Prostitute, the Intersexed. These same states took a marked interest in enforcing public health and hygiene by way of laws targeting private sexual behavior, from birth control to interracial relationships. These interventions expressed sharp anxieties about the character of modern life: urbanization, industrialization, democratization, the rise of the middle classes, empire. The course will combine an interrogation of primary texts from the early modern and modern periods with secondary and theoretical works dealing with history, law, and sexuality.

 

Satisfies a major requirement in History

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.  Only counted in one track.

Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies  Only counted in one track.

Satisfies a distribution requirement in Historical Thought

HIS 336 European Women and Gender, 1650-Present
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Tilburg

The contributions of women in modern Europe, as well as the ways that gender difference was employed in constructing political and social relations. Topics include scientific debates and women, the birth of feminism, women and the Industrial Revolution, prostitution, women and fascism, and changing concepts of masculinity. 

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement. 
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

HIS 364 Race, Sex, Power in Latin America
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mangan

This course focuses on the history of Latin America through overlapping lenses of race, sexuality, gender, and class. Specific topics include sexuality and the Inquisition, reproductive health and the state, gender and revolution, sexual repression in dictatorship. Discussions of historical context, power structures, and intersectionality will serve as the starting point for the semester.  Thereafter we will divide our time between analysis of primary historical texts and cutting edge scholarship.

Satisfies an Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.
 

HIS 378 Love, Longing, & Desire in South Asia
Prerequisites & Notes

This course will investigate constructions of gender relations as power relations, as well as perceptions of sexuality in South Asia as historical phenomena from the seventeenth century to the present. Subjects include: cultural conceptions of family; notions of same-sex desire; law, tradition, and reform; the making of gender relations across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as they were informed by colonialism and nationalism.

 

Satisfies a major requirement in History.
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in South Asian Studies.
Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in International Studies.
Satisfies an Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Meets the cultural diversity graduation requirement.

HIS 389 Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Japan
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Mortensen

This course explores gender dynamics and the lives of women in Japan from the nineteenth century to the present day. It introduces students to the gendered dimensions of Confucianism, marriage, paid employment and unpaid work, parenting, war, political activism, structural power, and popular culture in Japan. Other topics include the political, social, and economic challenges that Japanese women and the Japanese LGBTQ community continue to face.


Satisfies a requirement for the History, East Asian Studies, and Gender and Sexuality Studies majors.
Satisfies a requirement for the Gender and Sexuality Studies minor.
Satisfies a requirement for the East Asian Studies and International Studies interdisciplinary minors.
Satisfies an Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement. 

HIS 422 Gender in Early Modern Europe (C. 15th-18th Centuries)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Dietz

From Christine de Pisan to Mary Wollstonecraft. An examination of changing roles, expectations, and desires of men and women, with particular emphasis on their interaction.

HIS 444 Southern Women, or How to Explain Scarlett and Mammy
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

An examination of the changing roles of black and white southern women from 1607 to the present, with an emphasis on understanding their unique character and history.

HIS 467 Family and Families in African History
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Weimers

Studies how Africans have defined and achieved family and family connections along with ways that states have attempted to use family--as metaphor, ideal, and unit of political and social organization-to organize African life from the 17th century to the present. 

Satisfies a major or minor requirement in History.
Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: Africa).
Satisfies a major and a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a Historical Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a cultural diversity requirement.

HIS 469 Work, Gender, and Political Imagination in Africa
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wiemers

Investigates how gender and labor have been used to construct and contest the political imaginaries of individuals, communities, and states in 19th and 20th c Africa.

Satisfies a major requirement in History

Satisfies a major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

Satisfies an interdisciplinary minor requirement in Global Literary Theory

Satisfies the Cultural Diversity distribution requirement

LAS 243 Sex, Drugs, & Money on the Mexico/US Border
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Luna

Ethnographic approach to understanding the social effects of several profit-generating industries in Mexican border cities: drug trafficking, sex work, and the maquiladora industry.  Emphasis on Mexico's relationship to the United States and how the implementation of neoliberal economic policies have profoundly circumscribed the way that people in Mexico earn a living and fulfill gendered kinship obligations.

Satisfies a requirement in the Latin American Studies major and interdisciplinary minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Anthropology major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Fulfills the Justice, Equality, and Community Requirement.

 

LAS 300 Major Thinkers in Africana Studies: Afro-Cuban Feminisms (=AFR 300)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Benson

Black and mulata women have participated in constructing Cubanidad (Cuban nationalism) since the beginning of the Cuban republic in 1902. However, the largely male-dominated national narrative that has made Che Guevara's "New Man" famous since 1959 frequently overshadows their interventions. Despite this public silence, Afro-Cubanas (Afro-Cuban women) have consistently challenged narratives of exclusion and contributed to antiracist and antisexist movements in Cuba. As theater critic, Inés María Martiatu Terry explained in 2011 one of the goals of the Afrocubanas movement is to "feminize negritude and to blacken feminism."  

This course will analyze Afro-Cubana feminisms through a close reading of the work of four key black and mulata intellectuals and activists-Sara Gómez, Nancy Morejón, Daisy Rubiera, and Gloria Rolando. In doing so, it seeks to trace the legacy of the many black and mulata women who participated in revolutionary Cuba from the 1960s to the present. In particular, the course will examine how Afro-Cubanas have challenged negative stereotypes about black women, worked both inside and outside of Cuba's state-sponsored women's movement, and fought to create space for racial and sexual rights. All course readings will be in English and will include memoirs, films, and first-hand historical documents in additional to scholarly books and articles.

The course can be repeated for credit given sufficiently distinct topics.

Satisfies a major requirement in Africana Studies

Satisfies a major requirement in Latin American Studies

Satisfies the Histories and Genealogies major requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies

POL 201 Methods and Statistics in Political Science
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to first-year students.

Instructors
Ceka, Menkhaus, O'Geen, Rigger, Sellers, Toska

The framework of social science analysis, and the use of statistics for studying political problems. Topics range from research design and hypothesis testing to correlation and multiple regression.

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement. 
Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

 

POL 207 Family and Justice
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Shaw

Examination of the ways in which families and political and economic institutions shape one another, with special emphasis on policies that promote marriage over 'alternative' family arrangements; state-mandated family leave policies; 'family-friendly' corporate employment practices; same-sex marriage; divorce law; and welfare reform.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

 

POL 423 Politics of Reproduction
Prerequisites & Notes

Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor
Roberts

This seminar examines political and policy questions regarding reproductive politics such as contraception, access to abortion, eugenics, artificial reproductive technology, egg donation, sperm banking, stem cell technology, sex education and surrogacy.  The politics of reproduction touches on nearly all avenues of politics: policymaking, public opinion, framing, activism, legislation, constitutional questions, and elections.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor (Society & Politics Track).

POL 424 Women in American Politics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Crowder-Meyer

This seminar explores the role of gender in American politics, specifically how gender affects the political activities of American residents, political candidates, and elected officeholders. Students analyze differences in men's and women's political participation, party affiliations, political attitudes, and campaign strategies and styles. Students also investigate why women remain substantially underrepresented in positions of political power and consider the implications of gender inequality in political officeholding.

Counts toward the major in Political Science.
Satisfies a requirement in the Society and Politics track of the Gender and Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

PSY 318 Psychological Research-Social
Prerequisites & Notes

Psychology 310 required; PSY 232 recommended but not required.

Instructor
Good

Research methods and statistical techniques used in social psychology are examined through lecture, laboratory, and field research. Students will gain knowledge in designing multiple types of research studies, as well as implementing a variety of data collection strategies.  Scientific writing and ability to understand and critique empirical articles will be emphasized.  Course requirements include participation in research as investigators.  Recommended completion by Fall of senior year for majors.

REL 127 Female Resistance in the Old Testament
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Claassens

This course will introduce a number of Old Testament narratives that show women using a variety of creative means in order to resist the violence of war, rape, patriarchy, and poverty. By means of this narrative portrayal of female resistance we will contemplate the nature and the extent of the challenges that cause women in particular to be vulnerable in our world today, in addition to thinking together of ways in which we may help change this reality.

Satisfies a major requirement in Religion

Satisfies a minor requirement in Religion

Satisfies the Philosophical & Religious Perspectives distribution requirement

REL 255 Woman and the Body in the Christian Tradition
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Poland

A study of Christian attitudes toward gender and the human body as reflected in scripture, doctrine, and practice.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 301 Perspectives in the Study of Religion
Prerequisites & Notes

Pre/Corequisites:  Any two Religion courses or permission of the instructor.

Students intending to go abroad in their junior year should take this course in their sophomore year, if possible. 

Instructor
Poland

Required of all majors. Critical examination of various methods, disciplines, and theories employed in the academic study of religion, focusing particularly on those approaches that locate religion in its social, cultural, and political contexts. Generally taught in spring semester. Required of all Religion majors by the end of the junior year.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

REL 365 Women in American Religion
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Wills

Using biographies and autobiographies of women from various periods and traditions of American religion, this course will explore women's roles in those traditions and the conventions through which those women have been portrayed.

Satisfies the Philosophical and Religious Perspectives distribution requirement.

 

REL 444 Black and Womanist Theology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
T. Foley

A study of African American theological writings written since the Black Power movement of the 1960s. Black theology refers typically to works written or inspired by theologian James H. Cone. Womanist theology describes a theology written specifically by and for African American women.

Satisfies a requirement in the Africana Studies major (Geographic Region: North America).
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.

RUS 266 Vampires
Prerequisites & Notes

(Not offered 2016-2017.)

Instructor
Staff

In this class we will examine the figure of the vampire, as well as the use of vampirism as a metaphor in folklore, literature, journalistic texts, theater and film. Some vampires, as we will come to learn, do not even drink blood. Many don't fear the sun. So what do these varied monsters have in common? Their "otherness" and their focalization of cultural desires and anxieties. By studying vampirism through a historical perspective, we will learn that vampires - although they may not have reflections - reflect our anxieties about alterity, particularly in regard to such charged subjects as gender, sexuality, race, religion and nationality.

Satisfies Historical Thought distribution requirement.
 

RUS 292 Queer Russia (=GSS 292)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Utkin

Russia is accustomed to playing the role of the "evil empire." The current ongoing war in Ukraine has resurrected the Cold War-era narratives about Russia as a dark, aggressive, and ruthless military power. The notorious legislation of recent years-whose functions range from barring Americans from adopting Russian orphans to criminalizing the so-called "gay propaganda"-have further solidified Russia's reputation as a country with little regard for human rights. Yet generations of Russian poets, artists, and writers have transformed the country's systematic oppression and violence into spectacular forms of protest and self-expression. This course focuses on gender and sexuality in exploring an alternative cultural history of Russia, which highlights its queer legacy from the nineteenth century to the present. We will examine poetry, fiction, art, memoirs, plays, films, performances, and discursive texts that showcase uniquely Russian conceptions of marriage, gender relations, gender expression, and sexual identity. Attention will be paid to the ways in which Russian and Western narratives of queerness align and diverge. In English. No knowledge of Russian is required or expected.

Satisfies major and minor requirements in Russian Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies Literary Studies, Creative Writing and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

SOC 102 Race, Class, Gender & Sexuality
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to seniors.

Instructor
Kaufman

This course addresses the multiple and intersecting ways race, class, gender, sexuality, individual life chances, and daily social interactions affect the larger society, we first take a detailed look at each of the core concepts: race, class, gender, and sexuality. Studying the "socially constructed" nature of these concepts, we ask what meanings and values have been attached to them, and how these social constructions help to rationalize and justify social inequality. We then analyze the significance of race, class, gender, and sexuality in a variety of institutional and interpersonal contexts, including schools, the workplace, families and relationships, and the criminal justice system.

 

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

 

 

SOC 201 Social Statistics
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor 
Deckard, Kaufman

Sociologists and other social scientists must describe and interpret social facts in order to make sense of the world around them. To do this, they often rely on the analysis of quantitative data using statistical methods. This course acts as a primer to sociological statistical analysis and students will learn to find and access social data, summarize patterns in that data, represent these patterns graphically, and explore relationships between different variables. Topics include descriptive measures, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, chi-square, correlation, and regression. This course is designed as a gateway to quantitative sociological research, and emphasis is on practice and implementation, with students also learning to use SPSS software.

Satisfies the Mathematical and Quantitative Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies a requirement in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

SOC 217 Gender and Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course introduces a critical approach to examining the social construction of gender. It explores several different perspectives on gender inequality and the role of social institutions such as family, education, economy, and media in creating the experience of gender in society.

Satisfies the Gender Studies Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 218 Gendered Communication in Society (= COM 218)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Martinez

Examination of the social construction of gender in both personal relationships and professional contexts. Areas to be explored may include: culture, verbal and nonverbal communication, family dynamics and close relationships, education, organizational communication, and roles in media.

Satisfies a major requirement in Sociology and in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies a requirement in Gender Studies and Communication Studies Interdisciplinary Minor. 

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement
 

SOC 237 Boys and Men in Society
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course focuses on the diverse experiences of boys and men. We start with the social construction of masculinities across race/ethnicity, class, and sexuality. Through this, we consider the advantages as well as the costs of contemporary notions of masculinity. We examine how boys learn to be men from pre-K through college. We then turn to men's experiences and interactions with various institutions, including work, family, and the media. We then consider the significance of violence in constructing masculinities. Finally, we focus on more inclusive conceptions of masculinity and men's role in promoting gender equality. We view all these issues through an intersectional lens, considering gender, race, class, and sexuality. 

Satisfies a major and minor requirement in Gender and Sexuality Studies.
Satisfies Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 246 American Families
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

Introduction to families in the USA. Dating, cohabitation, marriage, divorce, remarriage, intergenerational relationships, domestic violence, and family policy are explored. Attention is given to issues of race, and class, gender, and sexuality.

Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.
Satisfies the Gender Sexuality Studies major and minor requirements.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 260 Oppression & Education (=EDU 260)
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to students with credit for EDU 210 or EDU 250.

Instructor
Kelly

This course examines various manifestations of oppression in the United States and the questions they raise about inequality and social justice within educational institutions.  We will apply methods of critical analysis drawn from anthropology, sociology, cultural studies, and psychology to an examination of social issues in the United States educational system.  We will examine education as a central site of conflict over the gap between the United States' egalitarian mission and its unequal structure, processes, and outcomes.  Students will rethink contemporary solutions to social diversity in education, develop a social justice framework which emphasizes inequality, and design an institutional ethnographic project as a critical intervention in schools and society.

Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

SOC 310 Gender, Race, and Sports
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

In this course, we will examine the interrelations between gender, race, and sports. We will view sports through a sociological lens and consider how sports are shaped by and in turn shape social interaction. We will focus on how sports influence our definitions of masculinity and femininity, the opportunities and obstacles sports provide for members of different racial/ethnic and gender groups, and the images associated with race, gender, and sports. We consider why certain sports are associated with certain races, how sport is used to prove masculinity, experiences of gay athletes, Title IX and issues of gender segregation, the politics of gender verification, sports as an opportunity for upward mobility, exploitation in college sports, racial position segregation in college football, sports and violence, the criminalization of black masculinity in sports, mascots and racial imagery, and representations of race and gender in sports media.

Satisfies Gender and Sexuality Studies Major and Minor, Africana Studies Major and Minor, and Social Science Thought.
Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 312 Gender, Race and Class in Media
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This course explores issues relevant to gender, race, and class in media. The course begins with the premise that all knowledge is constructed. As with other institutions, the media play a critical role in the construction of knowledge, particularly that related to our ideas about gender, race, and class. This course will mainly emphasize the representation of gender, race, and class in media.

Satisfies the Gender Studies, Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.

SOC 372 Feminist Theories
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Staff

Introduces students to key concepts and debates within feminist social theory.  Explores the significance of gender within social life, how gender is produced at the individual and institutional levels , as well as feminist conceptualizations of 'the good society.' Addresses key questions of social theory including the relationship between individuals and social structures, the construction of identities, and the meaning of power.

Satisfies the Gender and Sexuality Studies Interdisciplinary Major and Minor.

SOC 382 Men and Masculinities
Prerequisites & Notes

Not open to first-year students.

Instructor 
Kaufman

In this course we will pay close attention to the construction of masculinities and how men both affect and are affected by the current gendered social order. Throughout the course, we will consider how men are enabled or constrained by key social characteristics such as age, race/ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation. In particular, we will address the following issues: the concept of hegemonic masculinity; the gender gap in education; the challenges men face as they move from adolescence to adulthood; masculinities in the workplace; body image among men; male infertility; Black masculinity in popular culture; the criminalization of minority males; and the deterioration of white men's sense of entitlement.

Satisfies the Justice, Equality, and Community requirement.

SOC 388 Marriage in the Age of Trump
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

On January 20, 2017, Donald Trump became the 45th President of the United States. After much momentum that culminated in Obergefell v. Hodges, the Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex marriage throughout the country, many feared that marriage equality would not last under a Trump presidency. In this course, we will focus on the impact of Trump's election on marriage and family, particularly for LGBTQ families. We start by considering the historical battles and shifts that led to marriage equality, including disagreement on the importance of marriage within the LGBTQ community; efforts for domestic partnerships; the defense of marriage at the federal and state levels; court cases, legislation, and ballot initiatives at the state level; and the Supreme Court ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges. We then examine meanings of marriage for same-sex couples, including marriage as material right, marriage as protest, and marriage as validation. Next we consider the impact of same-sex marriage on the institution of marriage and LGBTQ people by focusing on societies where same-sex marriage has been legal for years. This course is organized as a research seminar so students will engage in their own research projects over the course of the semester.

Satisfies a requirement in the Sociology major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies the Social-Scientific Thought distribution requirement.

 

SOC 390 Qualitative Research Methods
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Marti, Ewoodzie

This class provides students with training in qualitative field research methods, with an emphasis on participant observation and in-depth interviewing. Students will conduct their own semester-long empirical research projects, going through the entire process of research design, data collection, coding, analysis, and writing. Readings and class sessions will focus on both theoretical foundations and techniques of interpretive, qualitative research. One of the best ways to develop research skills is to get out there and try it, to reflect on the process as you go, and to talk about what is working and not working for you with a group of colleagues and peers. Therefore, students will have extensive opportunities to reflect on their own research practices, learning by doing.

SOC 391 Survey Methodology
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Deckard, Kaufman

This course introduces students to survey research methods.  Sociology is based on empirical data.  Sociologists are trained to collect data in order to answer questions.  One of the most commonly used forms of data collection within sociology is the survey.  In this course, students will gain experience in designing a survey, sampling, administering a survey, and analyzing survey data. 

Counts as an elective in the Data Science interdisciplinary minor.

 

SOC 488 Fatherhood
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Kaufman

This seminar focuses on the social, cultural, and historical study of fatherhood.  We start by breaking down stereotypes of fathers from the past and using this to reconsider modern fathers. As we consider current American society (mainly), we start with young men's procreative consciousness (ideas and awareness about conception, pregnancy, abortion, and potential fatherhood). We consider fathers as gendered beings asking questions such as, can men mother? We discuss the experiences of stay-at-home fathers, gay fathers, stepfathers, and single fathers. Finally, we consider fathers' rights movements.

SPA 344 Latino Culture in the U.S.
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents. (Spring)

Instructor
González

This survey course explores the development of a distinctly Latina/o culture in the U.S. Topics covered include: the changing nature of geographic and economic borders from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century; the history and legacy of racism and xenophobia; the construction of canons; the politics of bilingualism; Chicana and Latina feminisms; culturally specific manifestations of gender and sexuality; and the exoticization and marginalization of Latina/o culture. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area III for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Satisfies the cultural diversity requirement.
 

SPA 375 Latin American Women Writers
Prerequisites & Notes

Spanish 260 and 270 or their equivalents.

Instructor
Maiz-Peña

An examination of genre, gender, and representation in women's writing in Latin America from the 20th century to the present.  Latin American women's textual and visual narratives: Practices and Theoretical Frameworks. Conducted in Spanish.

Satisfies Area V for the major in Hispanic Studies.
Counts towards Gender & Sexualities Studies, the interdisciplinary minor in Global Literary Theory, and Latin American Studies.
Satisfies the Literary Studies, Creative Writing, and Rhetoric distribution requirement.

SPA 403 Latino American Sexualities
Prerequisites & Notes

Any two literature or culture courses. Limited to juniors and seniors. Priority will be given to majors, then minors. (Not in 2016-17)

Instructor
González

This course explores theories of gender and sexuality from both North and South and their dialogue with transnational American cultural production. Throughout the semester, we will consider a diverse group of U.S. Latina/o and Latin American literary texts, films, and performances and investigate their construction of sexual, gendered, national, and ethnic identities.

A substantial final research project will be required. Conducted in Spanish.

SPA 407 Gender and Memory in Television and the Novel
Prerequisites & Notes

Completion of a 300-level course in Spanish, or permission of the instructor. Limited to juniors and seniors. Priority will be given to majors, then minors. (Fall 2016)

Instructor
Kietrys

What can prime-time television teach us about gender? What can a novel teach us about Fascism? What can a film teach us about memory? We'll consider these questions and more as we examine representations of women in Spanish media from the Second Republic through today. We'll also explore gender construction at different moments in recent history, including differences between the "ideal woman" of the early 20th century and the early 21st century. Discussion of the supporting roles of male characters will also inform our analyses. Course conducted in Spanish. Counts for Major & Minor in GSS and Hispanic Studies.

 

THE 242 Women's Work: 21st Century Female Playwrights (=ENG 242)
Prerequisites & Notes

Instructor
Green

This course provides a close look at work created for the stage by women since 2000. The analysis of plays written and produced in the 21st century will be set in the context of feminist and queer theory which has offered insights into the cultural function of "women's work."

Satisfies a requirement in the English major.
Satisfies a requirement in the Theatre major or minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Literary and Cultural Representations track of the Gender & Sexuality Studies major and minor.
Satisfies a requirement in the Global Literary Theory interdisciplinary minor.
 

THE 383 Contemporary Theatre and Performance: Trends in Theatre Studies
Prerequisites & Notes

One previous THE course required or permission of instructor

Offered every other year.

Instructor
Green


This course introduces students to current artists, working methodologies, and scholarship within the field of theatre and performance.  The course focuses on ways broader cultural dialogues about identity-sexuality, race, gender, class, ability-and technological innovation influence what appears on-stage, and the ways that audiences and critics think and write about these performances.  Course includes field trips to see live performances.