• Jacob Paul & Halina Duraj

    Thursday, Sept. 11  •  6:30 p.m.

    A professor at High Point University, Paul's work has appeared in Hunger Mountain, Western Humanities Review and USA Today's Weekend Magazine, as well as on The Rumpus and Numero Cinq. Duraj's short story, "Fatherland" was awarded an O'Henry Prize while another was short-listed for a PEN/O'Henry Prize. Other work has been listed as notable in The Best American Essays.

  • Joan Lipkin

    Saturday, Sept. 20  •  7 p.m.

    Joan Lipkin and occupational therapist Fran Cohen co-founded  DisAbility Project. Comprised of people with and without disabilities to model inclusion, the project creates and tours original material about the culture of disability. Now in its 17th season, DisAbility Project brings awareness and sensitivity to issues in the disability community through a combination of art and advocacy.

  • Anya Von Bremzen

    Wednesday, Oct. 1  •  8 p.m.

    A contributing editor at Travel + Leisure Magazine; Anya contributes regularly to Food & Wine, Saveur and has written for The New Yorker, Departures, and The Los Angeles Times. Come taste recipes from her award-winning cookbook, Please to the Table: A Russian Cookbook, for lunch at Vail Commons also on Oct. 1 sponsored by the Russian Department and Dining Services.

  • Merle Collins

    Wednesday, Oct. 15  •  6:30 p.m.

    Able to absorb her Grenadian upbringing and weave it together with rich folklore and everyday life through written rhythmic familiarity, Collins is a one of today's most skilled writers of poetry and prose extensively exploring the disaporic experience. While her characters may travel far and experience anxieties of being away, they are continually conscious of their memories of home.

  • Reynolds Lecture: Marjane Satrapi

    Thursday, Oct. 16  •  7 p.m.

    Satrapi lives in Paris where her illustrations appear regularly in newspapers and magazines all around the world. In September of 2012, Le Bon Marché invited French actress Catherine Deneuve to help celebrate its 160th anniversary. The store windows featured three-dimensional versions of 10 illustrations by Marjane Satrapi showing Deneuve in humorous situations.

  • Nina Simone & The Civil Rights Movement

    Sunday, Nov. 2  •  7:30 p.m.

    "I didn't like ‘protest music' because a lot of it was so simple and unimaginative it stripped the dignity away from the people it was trying to celebrate. But the Alabama church bombing and the murder of Medgar Evers stopped that argument and with ‘Mississippi Goddam,' I realized there was no turning back." – Nina Simone. This presentation honors the lives of those who struggled for civil rights in America.

  • Davidson Reads

    with Gwendolyn Heasley '05 and Rebecca Joubin

    Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015  •  6:30 p.m.

    Gwendolyn Heasley is incredibly grateful that the recession left her unemployed and able follow her dreams and write her first novel, Where I Belong. Rebecca Joubin's latest book is a tribute to televisual Syrian culture and how progressive the topics have become.

  • Jacqueline Osherow

    Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015  •  6:30 p.m.

    Often writing in demanding formal structures, Osherow's poetry is both conversational and learned, concerned with the intricacies of faith and the weight of history. Particularly interested in biblical inconsistencies, Osherow's psalms have their root in holy poems she heard as a child at temple: "If I write out a specific poetic tradition, it is the Jewish poetic tradition, American poet though I am."

  • Stuart Dybek

    Thursday, March 26, 2015  •  6:30 p.m.

    The Distinguished Writer in Residence at Northwestern University and having taught for more than 30 years at Western Michigan University, Dybek is one of the first writers of Polish descent who write about the ethnic self to receive national recognition. His unique portrayal of settings and landscapes often lends his writing to comparisons of Saul Bellow and Theodore Dreiser.

  • Tony Earley

    Thursday, April 9, 2015  •  6:30 p.m.

    Earley studied English at Warren Wilson College, graduating in 1983, and later received an MFA in creative writing from the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa. He quickly found success writing short stories, first with smaller literary magazines, then with Harper's. For a treat, read Earley's humorous 2010 commencement speech at Warren Wilson College.

Literary Arts

The English Department annually presents 10-12 writers, often winners of Pulitzer Prizes, MacArthur "genius grants," National Book Awards and various other honors. All writers brought to campus work with students personally; all public presentations are free. All events are in the C. Shaw Smith 900 Room of the Alvarez College Union (unless otherwise noted) and open to the public. For more information, please email Kathy Barton or call 704-894-2254.

Upcoming Events

head shots of Jacob Paul and Halina Duraj

Jacob Paul & Halina Duraj Reading

Thursday, Sept. 11  •  6:30 p.m.
Carolina Inn

Jacob Paul's 2010 debut novel, Sarah/Sara, was called one of that year's five best first fictions by Poets & Writers. Halina Duraj's debut short story collection, The Family Cannon, was published in 2014. Her short fiction has been published in The Sun, The Harvard Review, Fiction, Witness and other journals. For more information, please email Christine Marshall or call 704-894-2136

Free and open to the public.

head shot of playwright Joan Lipkin

Joan Lipkin "Let's Talk About Sex, Baby!"

Saturday, Sept. 20  •  7 p.m. & 9 p.m
Tyler-Tallman Hall, Sloan Music Center

Bacca Foundation Visiting Scholar and Artist Program

Playwright and director Joan Lipkin will engage Davidson College students in an original theater performance that will look at the issues of sexuality facing college students today. Devised over the course of a week, the performance will begin with the shooting of an original music video. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Re/Presenting HIV/AIDS. Contact Ann Fox for more info.

Free and open to the public.

head shot of Anya Von Brezmen

Anya Von Bremzen

Wednesday, Oct. 1  •  8 p.m.

Author of Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir of Food and Longing, Anya von Bremzen is one of the most accomplished food writers of her generation; the winner of three James Beard awards and the author of five acclaimed cookbooks. In her talk, she will explore the complex and fascinating connection between history, memoir and food spanning the entire Soviet century. For more information, please email Amanda Ewington or call 704-894-2397. (photo ©Jon von Pamer)

Free and open to the public.

head shot of Merle Collins

Merle Collins

Wednesday, Oct. 15  •  6:30 p.m.
Carolina Inn

Growing up in Grenada and using the country as a backdrop for her writing, Collins often tells stories of racial, political, cultural and societal concerns. Currently a professor at the University of Maryland, she is the author of three novels, Angel, The Colour of Forgetting and the forthcoming Invisible Streams as well as a collection of short stories and three collections of poetry. For more information, please email Brenda Flanagan or call 704-894-2434.

Free and open to the public.

head shot of Aristofanes Cedeno

Aristófanes Cedeño

Wednesday, Oct. 15  •  7:30 p.m.

Associate Professor of Spanish Literature at the Univeristy of Kentucky, Cedeño's teaching and research interests include natural law, nineteenth-century literature and the Romantic Movement, areas in which he has edited a book and published several papers. He was recently appointed to the Board of Directors of the Kentucky Humanities Council. Cedeño earned his Ph.D. in Spanish Literature from Michigan State University.

Free and open to the public.

head shot of Marjane Satrapi

Marjane Satrapi

Thursday, Oct. 16  •  7 p.m.
Duke Family Performance Hall, Knobloch Campus Center

Reynolds Lecture

Born in Iran, studied in Paris, Vienna and Strasbourg, Satrapi took the book and film world by storm with her autobigraphical graphic novel, Persepolis. The book, having been named to the "100 Best Books of the Decade," has been translated into more than 40 languages while the film has received over 15 major international awards, including two Cesar Awards–the French version of the Oscars. For more information, please email Mark Sutch or call 704-894-2728.

Free and open to the public.

head shots of Toni Toppence and Brenda Flanagan

Reading & Recital: Nina Simone & The Civil Rights Movement

Sunday, Nov. 2  •  7:30 p.m.
Tyler-Tallman Hall, Sloan Music Center

Edward Armfield Professor of English Brenda Flanagan and nationally renowned jazz singer Toni Tupponce will present a Nina Simone reading and recital. Flanagan will read from her upcoming book, Mississippi God Damn, on the year-1967-in which she worked with the international singer Nina Simone. Tupponce, backed by pianist Lovell Bradford, will accompany the reading with songs by Nina Simone that are related to that pivotal year in the history of the modern Civil Rights Movement. Contact Diane Thornton for more information.

Free and open to the public.

Gwendolyn Heasley and Rebecca Joubin head shots

Davidson Reads: Gwendolyn Heasley and Rebecca Joubin

Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015  •  6:30 p.m.

Gwendolyn Heasley '05 is the author of three young adult novels and a digital novella, The Art of Goodbye. Rebecca Joubin is currently the Partin Assistant Professor of Arabic Studies. Her current book, The Politics of Love: Sexualtiy, Gender, and Marriage in Syrian Television Drama tells of musalsalat-Arab television dramas or soap operas.

Free and open to the public.

head shot of Jacqueline Osherow

Jacqueline Osherow

Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2015  •  6:30 p.m.
David & Pam Sprinkle Room, Alvarez College Union

A Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Utah, Osherow is the author of six books of poety, Whitethorn being her most recent. Her work has appeared in numerous anthologies and journals: The New Yorker, The New Republic, Best American Poetry and Norton Anthology of Jewish-American Literature to name a few.

Free and open to the public.

head shot of Stuart Dybek

Stuart Dybek

Thursday, March 26, 2015  •  6:30 p.m.

R. Windley Hall and Charles E. Lloyd Awards in Writing

Having written two collections of poetry and five books of fiction, Dybek's The Coast of Chicago was selected as a "New York Times Notable Book." His awards include a PEN/Malamud Award, a Guggenheim fellowship, a MacArthur fellowship and an O. Henry Award.

Free and open to the public.

head shot of Tony Earley

Tony Earley

Thursday, April 9, 2015  •  6:30 p.m.

Vereen Bell Memorial Award in Creative Writing

Tony Earley is the author of the novels Jim the Boy and The Blue Star. His fiction has earned a National Magazine Award and appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's and Best American Short Stories. Earley was chosen for both The New Yorker's inaugural best "20 Under 40" list of fiction writers and Granta's "20 Best Young American Novelists."

Free and open to the public.