The Center for Civic Engagement provides grants and seed funding to support service and social action throughout the United States and abroad.

Examples of funded projects include an internship with an urban garden focused on food justice, medical mission work in the Dominican Republic, and a summer-long service experience with an orphanage in Bolivia.

If you want to extend your opportunities for service further, consider applying for a grant to fund your next service project. There are a variety of grants available to fund student service projects.

Available Grants


Kathryn W. Davis Projects for Peace Grant

Spring Only, final due date Tuesday, January 21, 2025, at 8 a.m.

Students or groups of students can apply for a $10,000 grant to support projects that promote peace and address the root causes of conflict among parties (projects undertaken during summer 2023). Projects for Peace encourages student initiative, innovation, and entrepreneurship focusing on conflict prevention, resolution, or reconciliation.

Application Details

The application includes two parts (A) a proposal narrative and (B) a budget must be submitted by Tuesday, January 21, 2025, at 8 a.m.

Part A. Proposal Narrative (2 pages single-spaced):

Please use this narrative proposal template that includes specifics on the font, spacing, header, and questions to guide your writing. Proposal narratives should:

  • Describe the project (who, what, where, how) including expected outcomes and prospects for future impact. 
  • Clearly demonstrate how the project will address root causes grounded in community needs/data.

Part B. Proposal Budget: 

Please use this required budget template that includes specific areas you should consider budgeting for to complete the project. Budgets should:

  • Cover how all $10,000 requested will be spent. 
  • Descriptions of categories where you will spend. I.e., if you flying and taking other forms of transportation please add in the "Notes" section what those forms of transportation will be and the expected expense. 
  • Update the rates as needed. i.e., food (weekly/ biweekly/ monthly).
  • A thoughtful, thorough, and well-researched budget helps us better understand how you will spend your grant. 

Review past grant recipient final reports

Past Recipients

Samuel Waithira '24

Growing Futures: Agricultural Empowerment for Hosanna Children's Home | Summer 2023
Kenya

The Growing Futures project sought to address the financial challenges of Hosanna Children's Home in Githunguri, Kenya, by establishing a sustainable pig farming initiative. Through the construction of a pig sty and breeding farming through training, the project aimed to generate income for the home while providing valuable agricultural education to the community, contributing to stability, poverty reduction, and youth engagement. Through the Growing Futures Peace Project, we've witnessed the transformative power of sustainable solutions in nurturing both economic stability and a sense of community.  This experience has taught me that by empowering individuals with skills and opportunities, we can truly sow the seeds of lasting peace and positive change. The grant allowed me to understand my community's challenges in a way I never envisioned before. A great thank you to the Project for Peace program for the opportunity! 

Kimberley Tanatswa Muchenje '22

Jekesa Remangwana (Futures Ignited) | Summer 2022
Zimbabwe 

Jekesa Remangwana is the first step in a long-term effort to generate biotechnological solutions to Zimbabwe’s impending biomedical, agricultural, and industrial issues. I partnered with three other students from Zimbabwe to run a biotechnology boot camp during which we collaboratively taught biotechnology techniques and their applications in biomedical, industrial, environmental, and agricultural processes around the world. Biotechnology has applications in all sectors that are key to solving Zimbabwe’s economic challenges and we believe by enriching the field, we are creating the much-needed solutions. This was an important goal for us to effectively inspire students in high school STEM programs to pursue and use biotechnology as a tool to combat some of the issues that are at the heart of endless internal and external conflict amongst Zimbabweans. We provided mentorship and professional development opportunities in the field of biotechnology to ensure that students received a clear picture of how one can advance in Biotechnology whilst in Zimbabwe. Participating students may someday develop crops that are resistant to pests, diseases, or adverse environmental conditions, reviving Zimbabwe’s declining agricultural industry, which serves as the country’s key source of income to alleviate food shortages and increase peace amongst people.

Frankline Edong’a '25    

Amani Youth Project | Summer 2022
Kenya

The Amani Youth Project's primary objective is to empower young people to serve as peace ambassadors in Turkana and Baringo. The project included the creation of a committee of twelve youths, six from each community. During the project, participants received training, traveled to war-torn areas to preach peace, and provided communities with access to basic resources like water. Efforts were mainly focused on the two counties' interior parts. The twelve youths from both communities that formed the project’s committee collaborated to come up with these places. Local chiefs, community elders, primary and secondary school teachers, and security officers also played an essential role in bringing members together and listening to their opinions about the conflict and the obstacles that prevented them from living in harmony. Additionally, we provided water storage facilities, channeled water closer to the communities, and repaired inefficient solar panels and water pumps to ensure people’s access to water. This allowed water to be accessed by communities and livestock, resulting in fewer water-related conflicts. The project received tremendous support from the Kenya Scholar Access Program (KenSAP) and the National Cohesion and Integration Commission (NCIC). The program aims to register as a CBO within the sub-county under self-help groups and organizations. The Amani Youth is committed to ensuring peaceful coexistence and youth empowerment within our communities. We hope to establish a youth-run organization in the future.

Sam Waithira

Engaging in the project transformed my perspective on the world. Witnessing the positive impact of sustainable solutions on vulnerable individuals shifted my understanding of how lasting change can be achieved and made me understand that sustainable change takes time.

Samuel Waithira '24

Leonard Fund

Spring Only:

The early due date is Sunday, February 23, 2025, at 11:59 p.m.

The final due date is Sunday, March 31, 2024, at 11:59 p.m.

Supported by Paul '62 and Judy Leonard, the Leonard Fund Grant supports students' summer service projects, community internships, service travel, or community project development. 


Ruth Pittard Fund for Love in Action

Spring Only:

The early due date is Sunday, February 23, 2025, at 11:59 p.m.

The final due date is Sunday, March 31, 2024, at 11:59 p.m

The Ruth Pittard Fund for Love In Action supports Davidson students pursuing meaningful summer experiences that honor Ruth’s values of collaboration, community building, participation, service, integrity, and love. The grant currently provides up to $5,000 in funds to support summer internships, projects, or experiences. Students who need funding to fulfill their dreams of helping others create a more humane world are encouraged to apply.

Watch Ruth Pittard's Message About The Fund


Robert T. Stone Fund

Spring Only:

The early due date is Sunday, February 23, 2025, at 11:59 p.m.

The final due date is Sunday, March 31, 2024, at 11:59 p.m.

Established in memory of Robert Stone, the Robert T. Stone Fund provides students with the opportunity to design environmental service projects that combine academic and personal interests.

Grant Applications

Unless otherwise specified, students interested in applying for summer grants should complete one common application (login required) found on WildcatSync for multiple funding sources. 

Applications for the spring 2024 grant cycle are due on a rolling basis in WildcatSync with an early due date for applications on Sunday, February 25, 2024, at 11:59 p.m. and the final due date on Sunday, March 31, 2024, at 11:59 p.m. (as funds remain available).  For more information on grants, contact email civicengagement@davidson.edu

The application consists of two parts:

Part A - Proposal Narrative

One part of the application consists of the proposal narrative, which should be no more than two pages single-spaced.

Please use this narrative proposal template that includes specifics on the font, spacing, header, and questions to guide your writing. Proposal narratives should:

  • use the following naming convention when you save your Word or PDF file: Full Name_ Class Year_Project Title_Proposal 
  • be a thoughtful, thorough, and well-written proposal that helps us better understand your project/internship/experience.

Part B - Proposed Budget

Please use this budget template that includes specific areas you should consider budgeting for to complete the project. Budgets should:

  • use the following naming convention when you save your Excel or PDF file: Full Name_ Class Year_Project Title_Budget
  • be a thoughtful, thorough, and well-researched budget that helps us better understand how you will spend your grant.

Students interested in applying for summer grants should complete one common application (login required) found on WildcatSync for multiple funding sources. 


Please note that the Bonner Scholars Community Fund and Kathryn W. Davis Projects for Peace Grant follow separate application processes.

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